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Author Topic: Yako Canard All-Sheet Balsa  (Read 788 times)
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ScienceGuy
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« on: March 21, 2012, 09:19:06 AM »

I happened across some plans this winter of a canard pusher free flight rubber powered sport plane known as the Yako. It is built from mainly 1/32" balsa. I left the landing gear off but it could use the weight in front as it requires a fair amount of nose weight. In the flight in the video it was still stalling but just a little more weight fixed that issue. A lighter prop might help also. The perfomance for an all balsa plane of this size is really pretty good.

http://youtu.be/FL3b9igecT0

Bill Kuhl
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Dave Andreski
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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2012, 09:38:23 AM »

Sure seems you have enough power there Bill.
A lot of these "For The Tenderfoot" designs show promise. Thanks for the video.
Dave Andreski
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ScienceGuy
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2012, 09:43:00 AM »

That is just 1/8" rubber, the plane was built from hobby shop balsa. It would appear to me that much could be done to improve the performance.  I have one of the P30 canard kits, Tail Firster I believe is the name.

Also I think I could do more with the thrust adjustment on the Yako.
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Dave Andreski
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2012, 10:09:15 AM »

I agree that thrust adjustments may help. Changing stab incidence may be another thing to try instead of adding weight.

I've only built one canard so I'm no expert at these. Mine is an Indoor Model, about 18.5" wingspan, flown outdoors. Once I got the stalling issues solved, it seemed that the Model would fly no matter what warps existed in the flying surfaces!

You're off to a good start.

If you don't already have the construction article for the Yako I can e-mail it. NOT that you need it.

Dave Andreski
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ScienceGuy
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2012, 10:13:35 AM »

Dave that would be great if you emailed the construction article, I only found the plans. scienceguy33@gmail.com

I have been experimenting with a canard glider made from two foam plates and a straw, glides pretty well.

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Re: Yako Canard All-Sheet Balsa
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Dave Andreski
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2012, 10:21:49 AM »

Bill,
Info sent. Published in 'American Modeler', Dec., 1971.
Thanks go to Garry, "The Plan Page", Hunter for this one.

The foam glider looks great!
Dave Andreski
« Last Edit: March 21, 2012, 10:35:10 AM by Dave Andreski » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2012, 04:17:58 PM »

The Yako canard just seems to keep flying better for me, amazes me how well it cruises at altitude. In the attached picture a vulture is checking it out.  Total weight is 16 grams and only 1/8" rubber is needed.
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Dayhead
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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2012, 01:08:21 PM »


  Anyone interested in the mechanics of flight, especially canards, may find my experiment interesting. I can't post a photo, but I'm sure a description will suffice.

  For what reason I don't know, I one day thought "What if the canard surface was allowed to pivot around it's aerodynamic center, using a reflexed, pitch stable airfoil? What would happen?"

  I made a few simple gliders using balsa and foam. The first effort consisted of a fuselage using 1/8" sheet foam sandwiched between 1/32" balsa. I used foam only for the flying surfaces.

  The canard was about 6 inch span with about 1 1/2" chord. I mounted it on a soda straw with a paper vertical fin, and used that to trim the canard; I found a reflex and cg setting that gave it a nice glide.

  I then cut the canard in half, and joined the halves back together with music wire. There was about 3/8" gap between these halves, and a piece of plastic tubing fitted to act as a bearing, located chordwise at the cg position I found using the straw fuse. I also ballasted the canard to balance at this point.

  I attached the bearing to the front of the fuselage and flew the glider. It was very interesting to play with.

  Usually, canards have a fixed angle of incidence that is set so that the canard will stall before the wing does. But this canard NEVER stalls, regardless of what the rest of the glider is doing. It's fun to launch the glider hard, but not fast enough to loop, so that it stops pointed straight up and tail-slides. You can watch the canard spin around 180 degrees and point back at the tail.

  Another version used two fuselages, with the canard mounted between them. This was easier as the canard simply pivoted around a piece of wire running straight between the fuselages, it was more durable as well. It had a "Voyager" look to it.

  I won't say any more, as I don't want to spoil the fun you'll have by making one. I never got around to powering mine, but as I write this I'm feeling inspired to go back in time and pursue the concept again, it's been I guess about 5 or 6 years ago.
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RandyW
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« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2017, 11:56:10 PM »

Clarence Mather designed many canards over the years.  All flew nicely including his Yako.  (okay spelled backwards)
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