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Author Topic: Swing Control  (Read 6048 times)
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LOUCRANE
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« Reply #50 on: December 09, 2016, 07:17:26 PM »

Bump? Nah...

Thoughts about "whip control" models and flying them... They are silent. They are clean (no oily exhaust mess; no expensive fuel.) Their radius is relatively small compared to powered tethered models. GOOD! And they are very gratifying - even FUN!

As an old ad stressed - Balsa flies better... (opinion, and I agree)

Using a short stick to either tie onto at the flier end of the line, or simply to extend your 'reach' and fly a larger radius while still keeping your cookies down. (Longer lap times, less dizziness and stomach rebellion.) To whip, keep the 'stick' aimed ahead of the model as you turn. IOW, tow the model around. The 'whip' also allows a decent measure of actual UP and DOWN control. And, the moves required are intuitive. How's it work?

Say you're using a hardwood 1/4" (~6mm) dowel 3' (~1 meter) long. Either attach the flying line at the tip of the stick, or use an eyelet like a fishing rod tip guide. (useful if you roll up the line between sessions.) You can fly well over a 20' (~6M+) radius! It might take pulling some slack line into the other hand, like building added reach when fly-casting, to launch without assistance.

The trick is to balance the model wa-ay forward. Usually you'll use a wire guide ahead of the wingtip leading edge. Gross description - something that looks like a soap-bubble wand, in miniature.

The SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLE:
(A) Pull on your flying string in flight will point at the model's CG (balance point fore and aft,) regardless of aerodynamic shapes. (or it will try to...)
(B) The aerodynamic bits are all aft of the CG and will trail the path the CG takes.
(C) Put the model's tip guide as near the near (inboard) wing tip as possible. The pull on your flying line(s) will help kill any tendency for the model to roll away from level. (Or, at least, from parallel to the flying line.)

Thus- point the stick's tip guide above the model's location as you whip it around. That puts the CG into a rising path. The aerodynamic bits will trail the CG ( just as the cloth of flags and pennants, that cheerleaders wave, trail the path of their flag "mast.")

Control will not be as crisp and positive as with an operating elevator, of course, but it WILL be there. Control Line model fliers often 'whip' their models in the landing glide - after the motor or engine noise stops - to make a smoother landing, or to reach a pit man, or to escape tricks the wind may create. And, that's with steel cable lines 60' (~17M) or more in length and no arm-extension stick.
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/LOU
LOUCRANE
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« Reply #51 on: December 09, 2016, 07:31:59 PM »

To Sprogs...

I've been flying control-line for well over 60 years, and I've welcomed many to, or returning to, control-line flight over the past few decades...

I usually suggest that CL flight is a learned reflex, like the skills in riding a bicycle. After a significant time away, when you come back, you can do it, but you WILL notice how shaky you can be, and how much work it is. That fades almost immediately!

Welcome back to "the best of circles!"
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/LOU
KDus
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« Reply #52 on: March 21, 2017, 05:40:14 PM »

This is why I discovered control line as a youth. My grandfather's air scouts manual from the 40's described this thread.
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Control Line!
simpleflyer
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« Reply #53 on: March 30, 2017, 11:39:43 PM »

Thank you, Dustin, for your comment.  It is interesting to learn that the Air Scouts used the concept of swing control models in their manual.  There was some interest and activity in swing control in the 1940s, but when the more conventional and complex model materials became available after the enc of WW2, swing control has become a scarce art.

Al
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sprogs
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« Reply #54 on: April 06, 2017, 03:14:35 PM »

Dear Simpleflyer
I am privileged to be trusted to look after my friend Julie's kid Jake who is autistic. He absolutely loves cars, boats and now planes. I would like to build with him a swing control model so that he an his friends can play safely and locally with them. Would you consider publishing, in the plans section or this thread, a clear plan and instructions for a simple sheet swing control plane that we could build together ? I think it would be the start of something wonderful for him.
Liz
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The interface between air and ground has no thickness at all. So why do I always find room for my aircraft there ?
grey78
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« Reply #55 on: June 14, 2017, 04:39:29 PM »

Liz, did you ever try the whip control with your friend's kid?  How did it go?
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sprogs
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« Reply #56 on: June 15, 2017, 02:25:09 PM »

Hi Grey78
Thank you for asking.
Unfortunately, for some time recently health issues have prevented me from seeing much of Jake, on a couple of occasions I've promised him an outing and not been able to leave the house. He takes these things very personally and I'm hoping to make it up to him.
I decided to keep things simple and I'm putting together an evans volksplane for him. All Flat sheet with a box fuselage, this means his action man can be pilot.
Liz
P.S. He is an absolute natural with my boomerangs, full circle 2nd day out !
P.P.s I'll post photos hopefully around early July.
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The interface between air and ground has no thickness at all. So why do I always find room for my aircraft there ?
LOUCRANE
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« Reply #57 on: August 17, 2017, 03:23:58 PM »

HI, Liz and all in here. Hope you've had progress!

I still prefer the term "whip control" for this type of flying. A whip is a simple tool, and perfectly illustrates the basic meaning of "tool," an extension of the abilities of the human critter.

In control line flying, a flier often has to stretch the landing glide. He calls his action: "whipping," although it is more like swinging his handle to pull the model, keep its speed so he can reach the point  where he wants it to touch down, (PC clarification: the masculine gender pronoun is used here without sexual significance. It fails to indicate which sex the person is - could be either  (or any one of many others?)   Cheesy
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/LOU
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