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Author Topic: Sweepette 30 design question  (Read 796 times)
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bythesea
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« on: June 29, 2012, 02:37:23 PM »

The plans show the tail group skewed to induce right turn. Makes sense. But, there is also a wash-in wedge on the right wing only.

According to the Wikipedia article on Washout:

Quote
Wingtip stall is unlikely to occur symmetrically, especially if the aircraft is maneuvering. As an aircraft turns, the wing tip on the inside of the turn is moving more slowly and is most likely to stall. As an aircraft rolls, the down-going wing tip is at higher angle of attack and is most likely to stall. When one wing tip stalls it leads to wing drop, a rapid rolling motion. Also, roll control may be reduced if the airflow over the ailerons is disrupted by the stall, reducing their effectiveness.

So, is the wash-in wedge on the right wing tip designed to add lift to the right wing tip to prevent the plane from spiraling in on the continuous right turn caused by the skewed tail group? Or, is it serving another purpose? As suggested, I'm spending some time studying the plans of Sweepette 30 and 36.

Thanks!
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flydean1
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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2012, 03:00:39 PM »

Note the difference in terms:  washIN as opposed to washOUT

The Wikipedia article refers to the "out" so wouldn't apply.  You are correct in assuming the washin wedge is there to prevent the glider from spinning in to the right. Smiley

Studying plans of established designs by proven winners is an excellent use of time.  That and posing questions on this and similar forums will shorten the learning curve greatly.  You are going in the right direction. Grin

Press on!
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BG
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Me with F1B - epic retrieval (flew 10km after DT)


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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2012, 04:07:35 PM »

Agree on all points made by flydean. The model will fly without a washin wedge but the launch recovery is apparently not as good and of course it keeps the inside wing up when the model speeds up in lift.

go ahead ...build one, you won't be sorry.
B
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F1B guy but its not my fault, Tony made me do it.
-John-
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2012, 05:52:25 PM »

bythesea, as you have likely noticed when browsing the discuskid website, there's a "Stan's Stuff" catalog for download. The kits Stan provides are great for folks new to the tip launch glider, as well as the most seasoned fliers. If you feel it is in your budget, I'd highly recommend getting materials from him. Make sure to get the TLG building instructions, as those are a few dollars extra and important for first time builders. One nice thing is that the fuselage assembly(s) for these kits are pre-built. If you choose to build a Sweepette 30 it is similar to the Dyno-mite in dimensions. The Sweepette 36 can be built from the Dynamo Hum 2 kit(as Leeper does). These gliders are all fun to fly and easy to trim with the incidence screw set up. Since you have reached a high level of success in such a short time; it is easy to see you have the building skills and knowledge to make these things work. The kits do require good model construction skills.
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sweepettelee
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Simplicate & add more lightness. Keep sanding!



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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2012, 07:02:49 PM »

Hey!
Here you gents are having a good converstation on bythesea's new topic, giving him good advice whilst I was
out this AM flying...wait for it...Sweepettes!  What else would you be expecting me to be flying?  Wink
John, BG, etal are correct about getting its from Stan.  You will not believe the quality and preparation he puts
into each kit for his clients. Shocked
FYI, I am just finishing the build on Stan's GREAT TLG design, "SPIN F1N".  I will try to post a build topic soon
about that effort. I hope to finish it this weekend and fly it soon after.
Stay tuned...

Leeper

PS: I did a CLG build topic here on HPA about a new glider named NEO18.  Check it out on CLG subject area.
Surprisingly Sweepette-like, I am told.  Wonder why...? Grin
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Leeper
-John-
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« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2012, 11:33:51 AM »

Lee, looking forward to the Spin F1N build topic!  The NEO looks really good, glad you are still designing new stuff.

Everyone is saying that Spin F1N's go really well. What kind of viscous timer would be good on such a machine?(I have the fuselage sans Stan's built in timer)
Some of the glider dudes told me what type badge or whatever to get last year -should have written it down  Huh

-advanced apologies to bythesea, as this is his thread
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sweepettelee
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Simplicate & add more lightness. Keep sanding!



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« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2012, 12:41:00 PM »

John,

I doubt that bythesea would mind being told that Starlink-FlightTech website lists Badge and Button timers.
They have been my choice of viscous timer for many years, to answer John's query.

Use this link:  http://starlink-flitetech.com/timers.html

Mind you, as e-timers are getting better & lighter, I have joined others who use them for TLGs, etc.
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Leeper
bythesea
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« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2012, 12:44:57 PM »

I doubt that bythesea would mind being told that Starlink-FlightTech website lists Badge and Button timers.

Not at all!  Smiley
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gavoss
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« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2018, 10:38:40 AM »

While this is an old topic, some may think this info comes too late, but I thought I'd add it anyway.  I didn't see any response that explains how the wedge effects high and low speed flight.  At high speed flight, as in during the launch, the wedge acts like an aileron rolling the model to the left.  As speeds slow down, the wedge acts like the old hanging flap on Old Time models from the 50's, inducing drag helping to cause the right turn. 
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This is Mission Impossible Mr. Hunt.  "Difficult" should be a walk in the park!
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