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Author Topic: Guillow's 300 Series Beaver and Porter  (Read 821 times)
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kittyfritters
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« on: August 19, 2012, 04:25:08 PM »

Here are a some pictures and videos of some of the prototypes I did for the Guillow's Beaver and Porter.

http://s121.photobucket.com/albums/o207/kittyfritters/?action=view&current=100_0035.mp4

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o207/kittyfritters/000_1099.jpg

http://s121.photobucket.com/albums/o207/kittyfritters/?action=view&current=000_0825.mp4

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o207/kittyfritters/000_0809.jpg

The production kits are in lighter wood and should fly better than these.
Guillow's 300 Series Beaver and Porter
Guillow's 300 Series Beaver and Porter
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Konrad
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2012, 10:12:38 AM »

Greetings,
In the video you said that the model that comes out of the box will fly better. Can I ask what changes you did to the production models. I'd like to know what these were so that I don't reverse engineer them out of my build.  Embarrassed

All the best,
Konrad
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kittyfritters
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2012, 11:38:59 AM »

Greetings,
In the video you said that the model that comes out of the box will fly better. Can I ask what changes you did to the production models. I'd like to know what these were so that I don't reverse engineer them out of my build.  Embarrassed

All the best,
Konrad

Konrad,

The production level model comes with lighter wood, four fewer ribs in the wing, a slightly different airfoil, and one degree more incidence in the wing.  I made the changes to the wing design as a result of flight testing.  The lighter wood is in all Guillow's laser cut kits.

The production model, of course, has a vacuformed plastic nose so you will probably have to put a minimal wooden structure inside to make it stiffer and allow for easier thrust line adjustments.  (Photo is of a 300 series Piper Cub nose.)

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o207/kittyfritters/000_0937.jpg

They adopted the former I put inside the rear of the removable nose in all my designs, but they did not adopt the keying method that I used so you will probably have to re-engineer that, slightly, to make the removable nose more solid.  I use small rare earth magnets to hold the noses on my models.  I have found that I do not need opposing magnets.  Placing magnets on the fuselage side opposing pieces of thin, steel shim stock (or a piece cut from a cat food can lid) glued to the former in the back of the nose is sufficient as long as the keying is solid.

Other than that, make sure it is balanced, trim carefully, and it should fly fine built right out of the box. 

The model flown in the video has a motor of two loops of 3/16" flat, F.A.I., tan, sport rubber about 1-1/4 times the hook to peg length lubricated with Armor All rubber protectant.  I use an aluminum tube for a motor peg and the rear of the motor has a 1/2", plastic, drapery tieback ring acting as a rear bobbin.  (Photo is of pusher stick and motor with a drapery ring.)

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o207/kittyfritters/000_0560.jpg

The flight you see is on about 750 turns.  This model is about 15 grams heavier than one built out of the kit.  The production weight kit, with the improved wing, flies very well on a motor of two loops of 1/8" flat, F.A.I., tan, sport rubber about 1-3/4 to 2 times the hook to peg length that will take 1500 to 1800 turns.

Howard

Guillow's 300 Series Beaver and Porter
Guillow's 300 Series Beaver and Porter
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Konrad
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2012, 01:50:22 PM »

Howard,
Can you give us any insight as to how you key the cowls? I too have noticed that the Guillow wood as of late is better than most of the kits I have from the 70's and 80's.

All the best,
Konrad
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kittyfritters
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2012, 11:54:05 AM »

Howard,
Can you give us any insight as to how you key the cowls? I too have noticed that the Guillow wood as of late is better than most of the kits I have from the 70's and 80's.

All the best,
Konrad

Konrad,

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to that one.  How I do it depends on how wide the nose is.  On most models, especially those of radial engined airplanes like the Beaver, I use a trapezoid shaped box key with the narrower side at the top so that it only goes in one way.  All my Beaver prototypes had box keys. (See attachment.) The Porter prototype in the video has two pins at the bottom of the cowl and a single magnet at the top.  This works but I'm not real happy with pin keys on relatively large removable noses and the later Porter prototypes also used box keys although I used a four pin key on one Porter prototype that worked very well.  If you add structure to the keys as they come in the kit to make a complete box with top and bottom detents they should work OK.

Many times when doing a model of an airplane with a liquid cooled engine I turn the former immediately behind the spinner into a removable nose plate.  This is keyed to the former immediately behind it with two dowel pins at the thrust line and magnets top and bottom.  This method is very good if you have an adjustable thrust button.  I have seen many other methods that work, but box keys and pin keys are the ones I use the most. 

I always face the former in the fuselage and the former in the nose with 1/64" plywood because that area takes a lot of stress, especially if a prop blade happens to be down when the model lands and the nose pops off.

Hope this helps,

Howard
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Re: Guillow's 300 Series Beaver and Porter
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Konrad
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2012, 01:37:20 PM »

Thanks Howard

I've always thought that plastic cowl was the bane of most Guillow kits, even more so than some of the wood issues. Keying the cowl and adding some internal structure to the cowl is a much needed design upgrade for many flying Guillow kits.

All the best,
Konrad
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