Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin  |  Contact Global Moderator
October 21, 2018, 01:01:29 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Could you cut Balsa with this?  (Read 3403 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Woodster
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 4
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 179

Topic starter


Ignore
« on: January 11, 2013, 08:16:46 AM »

http://www.cardcraft-uk.co.uk/cricut-mini-personal-electronic-cutter-machine-p-8277.html

In the description it says:

"Cuts a wide range of materials—including cardstock, vinyl, vellum, fabric, chipboard, and even thin foils"

Bit skeptical but if someone else would like to try one ...  Grin
Logged
Bredehoft
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 51
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 946


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2013, 09:11:14 AM »

I would be skeptical.

One review said it requires multiple passes to cut thicker material.

Also, I did not see that you could access the machine outside of their proprietary on-line "craft room" application.

I guess this type of machine is relatively popular with the crafters and scrapbookers.

--george
Logged

Volare Products Blog: http://www.volareproducts.com/
Volare Products Store:  http://www.volareproducts.com/BUY/
Follow on Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/VolareProducts
Crabby
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 125
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,857


I never met a modeler I didn't like



Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2013, 09:15:52 AM »

Scanning the product description leads my to think it only works with "Cricut" files, you may not be able to create custom files with it such as wing ribs etc.... but it is interesting to think that someday we may be able to cheaply deny our hands, fingers, and minds, of the joy of creation!
Logged

The Threadkiller!
DaddyO
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 61
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 1,448




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2013, 09:27:17 AM »

I suspect it couldn't old fruit (Looks like a cheapo 'vinyl' cutter, of which I have a lot of experience) Stuff like rubber sandblast material can be cut with difficulty, but whilst you might see the supplier do this with a demo machine in the real world you wouldn't try it and expect good results

Sorry to be a party pooper  Embarrassed
Paul
Logged

There cannot be a crisis today, my schedule is already full
Woodster
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 4
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 179

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2013, 09:40:14 AM »

Pretty much what I thought. Always worth asking others though in case I had my pessimist head on when I saw it!
Logged
lincoln
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 29
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,752



Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2013, 10:51:27 PM »

I am not the right person, but I'm guessing a good electronics hacker could make this work as a computer controlled machine that you could use with dxf files or something. If you're making small models out of good balsa and keep the blade very sharp, seems like almost anything would cut balsa. Certainly it's easier to cut than cardboard.

I suppose electronics hackers aren't very easy to come by, but you could check Instructables.com. Maybe someone has already done this.

The part I'd dread in a project like this is making the software work.
Logged
Woodster
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 4
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 179

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2013, 06:33:11 AM »

So I suppose the answer is it may well cut Balsa, just only heart shapes or leaves etc! Shame. Still I suppose laser cut kit supplies can breath easy a little longer.  Grin
Logged
Robmoff
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 3
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 205




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2013, 07:04:55 AM »

Just spent an hour or so researching these cutters on the net. My conclusions:-
What they call chipboard is not what you might use to make furniture, it’s a mountcard for picture framing!
•   Max thickness seems to be 1mm
•   The ‘design’ software allows you to import elements and arrange them, you pay for packs of elements.
•   There are models that cut up to 13” wide roll type materials, and they will import BMP and JPG files for you to modify, but still have the 1mm max thickness and cost over £600.
•   Cutting blades are EXPENSIVE.
I won’t be buying one!
Rob
Logged

Never underestimate the innate hostility of inanimate objects.
Woodster
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 4
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 179

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2013, 07:28:07 AM »

Thanks for taking the time to research this Rob. I won't be buying one either. Lets hope something more suitable comes onto the market in due course.
Logged
Tilou
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Belgium Belgium

Posts: 76



Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2013, 07:05:35 PM »

I have a Craft Robo.
Cutting balsa 0.8mm is only possible with 10-12 passes, but after 20 ribs the blade is shot...and the mechanism of the machine doesn't like it Undecided Undecided
Cricut is a little bigger but...
Logged
One cut
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 17



Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2013, 04:22:26 PM »

Definite NEGATIVE on using the Cricut for cutting balsa.  My wife has one and for scapbooking and such it is good.  Not for balsa wood.
Logged
Dimeflyer
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 55
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,346



Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2013, 04:47:48 PM »

Glad I caught this discusion -I will not bother looking it up !
George
Logged
FLYACE1946
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 23
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,451




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2014, 08:32:58 PM »

Here is a question with a serious twist:

I need to cut 1/16th Ply and wonder if the Midwest Products Easy Cutter Ultimate will get the job done. If not capable of this please advise what will cut into 2X3 inch squares. Really am curious. Scissors broke in my hand a few minutes ago. The tool is supposed to cut up to half inch sticks but since that is balsa I don't know what to expect.

I went to two stores and called 2 more before finally finding the 1/16th plywood I needed.

Thanks for any help . I really want to know today.
Logged
skyraider
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 89
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,249

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2014, 10:16:35 PM »

Someone on another forum mentioned using a Tile Cutter for cutting plywood
up to an 1/8 thick.  Might be worth looking into.

Skyraider
Logged
FLYACE1946
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 23
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,451




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2014, 11:16:44 PM »

Thanks for the tip. I was able to cut the ply with some heavy duty kitchen scissors. Then I was able to finish the job by sanding off the cornes and can go on now with the rest of the project.

There must be some limit since the Midwest tool would not provide enough pressure to cut the 1/16th plywood.
Logged
BCFlyer
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 2
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 72



Ignore
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2014, 03:01:27 PM »

For 1/16 ply the methods are sort of in the middle.  As you found out a set of heavy shears or tin snips will cut the plywood but it doesn't leave a clean edge.  Similarly multiple passes with a knife will score the wood through.  But it's slow and a little risky if you need to move quickly.

A table saw with a "zero clearance" insert around the blade works well.  But not everyone has a table saw handy.  The tile saw would work but you'd want to get a toothed blade since diamond blades don't cut wood worth a darn.

A small battery operated skill saw set and held upside down with a thick plywood auxiliary table can be a pretty quick and easy table saw if the amount you need to do justifies the work and time.
Logged
BCFlyer
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 2
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 72



Ignore
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2014, 03:16:40 PM »

This thread got me looking at the Cricut.  Like many of you have found the Cricut is limited as to files it can be fed.  But I saw references to a Silhouette Cameo machine.  Checking into it I found that the software is far more adaptable to user generated files. 

The only trouble is that it's still limited to 0.8mm maximum thickness.  But the options for cutting out tissue and film markings would be amazing.  I just need to figure out if I'd use one enough to justify the cost.

With all the hobby options for things like thin plywood puzzles and building doll houses and scale furniture I wonder if we could urge a company of this sort to come up with a similar router cutter that works for plywood and hardboard up to 3mm thick.  Such a machine could cut balsa up to the same 3mm and allow us to produce parts pretty quickly and easily.
Logged
C/L Gee Bee
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 3
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 105



Ignore
« Reply #17 on: March 14, 2014, 07:07:05 PM »

Weigh the options:  How much are laser blades?
Logged
Dave Andreski
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 82
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 3,052




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 14, 2014, 07:15:50 PM »

Weigh the options:  How much are laser blades?

Sorry,
What's a 'laser blade'?
Thanks,
Dave
Logged

Aspire to inspire before you expire.
randoloid
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 6
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 95



Ignore
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2018, 07:00:15 PM »

I've got the Cricut Explore Air and "think" I've finally perfected cutting 1/16 balsa-  I draw original files in Adobe illustrator, export as a SVG file.  My tips are similar to most-  

  • Do Crosscuts first
  • The order of the cuts will follow the order of the layers (from bottom to top)
  • Shapes even follows the order of the points drawn to make the shape... so plan accordingly - Make all crosscuts start from the same side and line them up for efficiency.
  • The machine doesn't do well with corners or tight turn angles. --I add a very small radius curve into tight turns.
  • For notches I only make the cross cuts, and finish the with the grain cut by hand.
Quick sketch added to aid my poor description but will most likely confuse you more Wink
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Could you cut Balsa with this?
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!