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Author Topic: Sterling Peanut Scale.  (Read 3472 times)
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Widdog
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« on: July 09, 2013, 12:34:52 AM »

I had purchased a Peanut Scale Sterling Models Inc. Corsair-Zero kit P4 a couple of years ago. I have been working on my model building/flying skill levels and decided that I was going to give this kit i.e. The Corsair a try. I was wondering if anyone has had any luck with  flying these kits? Although I have the complete kit I will "Scratch" build my model. I have purchased the wood, plaster and have a vacuum forming set up already to go.  in other words I will make a copy of the kit so I can keep the kit original and complete. This of course is due to the fact that Sterling no longer produces these kits. Anyway IMHO this is a very good kit and the writing on the box says " Both Models are Fine Flyers if Built According to Plan."   
Although I am building the Corsair I am interested in any comments about any of the planes in this series.
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TJH
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2013, 12:31:14 PM »

I have built the Peanut Citabria from this series and it is an excellent flyer.
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Widdog
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2013, 02:26:40 PM »

Thanks for the Info TJH. I decided to take my time and build a good model. Hopefully I can get a good flying model as well. The wings are a bit challenging for me but once I get them framed up I should be ok. 
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Widdog
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« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2013, 05:29:03 AM »

I had been working with "Multi Purpose" plans and flying them with rubber power. I noticed that it took a lot of work to get maybe a 20 second flight. I'll say one good thing about flying these "Multi Purpose" planes it sure made me learn a lot about rubber and how to "Max Out" it's power. Anyway I eventually learned how to use my own wood to "Scratch" build these kits instead of using the kit wood. It helped some but from now on I will only be building from plans that are designed for rubber power. BTW I was able to frame up the wings. It was a bit challenging for me but definitely worth the effort IMHO.
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Widdog
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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2013, 05:56:01 PM »

I have had this kit for a couple of years and kept it complete. I used it and copied it to make my first scratch built model. Although I now have a pretty decent selection/supply of wood. At that time I only had 1/16 inch sheet and stringers. Even though the model was kind of heavy it flew IMHO better than the Multi Purpose kits I was so into at the time. This time I am taking my time and using the thinner wood as per the instructions. I am hoping for some decent flights. Heck I would be happy with 20 - 30 second flights     
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Widdog
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« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2013, 09:46:32 AM »

Since they no longer make these kits I make a copy the parts I need. I try to keep the original kit in as nice a condition as possible. 
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Widdog
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« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2013, 01:54:14 PM »

I remember I read somewhere that when working on Peanuts one should work on them two at a time. i.e. Work on one till the glue needs to dry than work on the other one. I decided to go with this Jimmy Allen Fokker DR 1 Scratch Build as my second model. Apparently it was printed in a newspaper in around 1932. Since this will be a total "Scratch" build I decided what the hey mine as well add it to this thread. 
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skyraider
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« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2013, 02:14:14 PM »

Widdog,
      Great to see these Sterling peanuts come to life again. Can you post that Jimmy Allan Fokker plan to the gallery?

Skyraider
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Widdog
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« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2013, 06:44:57 PM »

@ Skyraider. I tried to upload plans but I got a Error message Width too wide. I have two plans I am going to try an message them to you. Hopefully you can post them. Thanks!   
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Widdog
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« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2013, 09:18:42 AM »

I used to think that it was better to work on one model at a time. Always finish the model before starting another one. Well long story short I think I was wrong. On this build I started to work on two builds at the same time. One build till the glue needs time to dry and then work on the other. I just wanted to say I really like my new building approach.
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Mooney
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« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2013, 10:14:58 PM »

Hi Wid
Good going so far.  Garry Hunter told me about scale Jimmy Allen plans but I never saw them.  VERY cool.
I really like peanuts, but am far from "expert" with them.  I do pay attention to weight, but concentrate on keeping my frames accurate.  A real light model with a banana fuse and warped flying surfaces will be tougher to get flying than a well built model that is a bit on the heavy side.  With experience you'll be able to get lighter. 

I've built a lot of bananas.  But thing are improving w each build.

moon
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Widdog
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« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2013, 02:26:28 PM »

Thanks Mooney for the great tips. Yes my builds get better and fly better with each build I do. I was sort of stuck a long time on the MP (Multi Purpose) kit. These kits designed for rubber power are so much lighter than the MP kits. I really learned a lot though about the Hobby from the ole MP kits. They where heavy but they where sturdy enough to hold up to the riggers of a Noob flying/crashing them. Of course I learned a ton of stuff from reading this Forum as well. 
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Dave Andreski
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« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2013, 02:13:54 PM »

Show us your flying pics!
Camera's broke again?
Dave
Lets see

Good job WIDDOG!
Dave
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Widdog
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« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2013, 03:23:54 PM »

I learned a lot about flying from these ole DC series Guillows models. Anyway here is a video taken with my "Hat Cam". I was kind of learning from these kits. I am hoping that the kits I am working on now will work out better for me. I'm still learning. This is a very challenging hobby and all.

http://youtu.be/6wXHscA_ox8
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Widdog
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« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2013, 05:52:55 PM »

On the instructions for the Jimmie Allen Dr1 it calls for the following. A 4 1/2 inch propeller to be carved out 3/8" x 5/8" inch Balsa wood. I have a plastic prop that is 4 1/2 inches so I don't think that will be a problem. Also it calls for 12" x 1/8" inch rubber. Once again no problem. The instructions say to  " Give the propeller about 100 turns in clockwise direction for full flights". I think I will have to do some experimenting to get to a better Prop x Rubber x Max winds combo. Because, I think I can get more winds in than just 100.
 
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Dave Andreski
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« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2013, 08:00:39 PM »

WIDDOG,
Thanks for the video. Love the "Hat Cam".
You could always start a new build thread for this Jimmie Allen DR1.
Dave
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Widdog
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« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2013, 10:36:31 PM »

Hi Dave,

Looking back on my work with the ole Multi Purpose kits... Probably the only accomplishment I made was the "Hat Cam". After I started scratch building these little Profile DC Series Guillows kits is when I had a epiphany.  Now I'm on a designed for rubber power only kick.  I was thinking about making a Topic about the Jimmy Allen DR1 but I don't know...I just don't think my builds/posts are as good as some of the more advanced modelers are. I really love to read about what the other modelers are up to...I figure since I read so much maybe I should try to post something...As my modeling gets better my posts seem be getting a little bit better too. Maybe it will all fall together for my Peanut Skyraider.
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lincoln
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« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2013, 03:25:36 PM »

Years ago, I built the Monocoupe. It flew perhaps 20 or 30 seconds, which is pretty good considering the heavy wood and vacuforming. A feature is that after many  years the vacuforming gets brittle. I thought the model was very attractive, though it might have been more so if I'd applied the markings with more skill. Seems to me that this particular peanut may have been a modification of an old Comet dime scale Monocoupe design:
http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_plans/data/thumbnails/73/monocoupe.jpg
http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_plans/details.php?image_id=1860&mode=search
I think you may be able to get a nice printed out plan of this one from Golden Age.

Seems like these Sterling designs need a lot of changes to be good flyers. Might be worth it, unless you are building them for sentimental reasons, to go with something a bit more flyable in the first place. Suggest, for instance, some kits or plans from Golden Age Reproductions. Jim is pretty good at picking wood that is suitable. Of course, it's not all identical and you need to put the light stuff in the tail, etc. How about:
-Pacific Ace, either size. The smaller one is popular for embryo in our club, though I think it might be close to the limit on area. Maybe needs a slight trim???
-Hein, Stormovic, or Hurricane I'll bet the other ones are good flyers too, but these are the ones I've seen. The P-35 can be a good flyer if given more dihedral or a floppy rudder.
-Heath Midwing, Spartan Cabin, Allied Sport Again, I'll bet the others fly well too, but these are the ones that come to mind first, that I've seen fly.

I've seen a couple of Diehls kits, and they seemed also to be of very high quality, though that was some time ago. Can't tell you which are the best flyers.

Penn Valley sells a bunch of dime scale reproductions. It's been a while but the ones I've seen were pretty good.

I realize most of these recommendations are a bit larger than peanut sized, especially the ones from Golden Age. But that makes them fly better. If it has to be a peanut, check out wordguy's stuff in the Hip Pocket plans gallery. And, of course, Walt Mooney's stuff.
Sterling Peanut Scale.
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Widdog
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« Reply #18 on: July 24, 2013, 09:35:29 AM »

Very good points you brought up Lincoln. I have worked with better flying models. http://youtu.be/CfpWzAX2zIY (Sorry it's the Hat Cam again) This is kind of a small field so I did not put in max winds. Anyway I had some success with a Guillow's 900 series kit I built once as well. I like the challenge of "Scale" model building/flying. I am very determined to someday have a good flying/looking scale model. 
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Widdog
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« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2013, 03:58:32 AM »

Finished the Jimmie Allen DR 1. I probably should have made the JA DR1 it's own build. It definitely was a fun build. I think it's more a sport than a scale model. I think it will fly. I put in a 100 winds and sent it across the basement floor, looked kind of promising for R.O.G.  Well back to the Sterling Corsair now.
Today I did some tests on a Multi Purpose model I have been experimenting with. If you watch the video, you will see a typical flight. First the model tilts to one side or the other. Than it banks into the ground. I read on "The Company Forum" that the answer was to  add some dihedral and build the stabilizer and elevator about 20% larger. Anyway the crash knocked a rather large bend into the dihedral. Since I had some winds left in it I decided to launch it and see what happens. The model ended up flying pretty well. I think I have the correct rubber (!/8 x 4 strands) and propeller (PP 6 inch) I have been thinking about rebuilding with a larger tail.

http://youtu.be/IVeXMePWXS8




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Widdog
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« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2013, 07:45:32 PM »

Backyard preliminary trim flights on the Jimmie Allen DR1. I hope to get to the gym and try it out indoors soon.

http://youtu.be/LZhXWekLioA
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Widdog
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« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2013, 06:14:54 AM »

Although I have experience with kit builds I'm still a Noob when it comes to scratch building. I'm still working on the Corsair but I have also started a AD-4B Skyraider Walt Mooney 6-18-67. I probably should make it it's own build but since it's too early to tell if it will turn out, I decided to post it here and see how it goes.
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lincoln
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« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2013, 09:41:17 PM »

Since the model flew quite well once it had an extreme amount of dihedral, it probably doesn't need a larger stab and elevator. My advice is to add SOME dihedral, and try it. A rule of thumb I've heard is to have the wing tips level with the bottom of the canopy, but that has NO theoretical basis. Still, I understand it works on normally proportioned low wing models, which yours appears to be.

If that amount of dihedral isn't enough, you don't necessarily have to add more. A smaller vertical fin/rudder, or making the rudder with a very light hinge so it can flop around, may be enough to make it fly right. Suggest using a piece of styrofoam plate for a temporary fin and cutting it with scissors until it flies right.

Here is a lousy photograph of the S2 racer I made from a Golden Age P-35 kit. I couldn't get it to fly stably until I hinged the rudder as mentioned above. It went on to be a good, consistent flyer. You can see in the picture that the rudder was over to the right when this picture was taken.
http://www.gryffinaero.com/models/ffpages/ffgallery/rosssev/rosssevs21.jpg
snip
Today I did some tests on a Multi Purpose model I have been experimenting with. If you watch the video, you will see a typical flight. First the model tilts to one side or the other. Than it banks into the ground. I read on "The Company Forum" that the answer was to  add some dihedral and build the stabilizer and elevator about 20% larger. Anyway the crash knocked a rather large bend into the dihedral. Since I had some winds left in it I decided to launch it and see what happens. The model ended up flying pretty well. I think I have the correct rubber (!/8 x 4 strands) and propeller (PP 6 inch) I have been thinking about rebuilding with a larger tail.

http://youtu.be/IVeXMePWXS8
Sterling Peanut Scale.
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« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2013, 11:06:47 PM »

Where is your CG on the DR1?  I find that if I locate 33% on the average of the multiple wings from the side view and adjust balance there, it's close on biplanes. Give it a shot. Yours appears to be hanging on the prop the whole time. It looks like it needs either a shim under the front of the stab or nose weight or both.
Give these quick adjustments a shot!
Keep us informed,
Dave
PS. I use a straight edge under the bottom wing and then drop a straight edge down from the front of the top wing. Use that total distance(chord-wise) and divide by three for starters.  Mark that point on whatever wing that would fall on and see if it balances.  That's just a starting point. You can get close using the plan side view and transposing that to your plane.
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« Reply #24 on: July 31, 2013, 01:05:39 AM »



 I couldn't get it to fly stably until I hinged the rudder as mentioned above. It went on to be a good, consistent flyer. You can see in the picture that the rudder was over to the right when this picture was taken.


Lincoln,

Is it necessary to have that much floppiness in the rudder? It may fly well but seems that it would look kinda strange with the rudder flopping wildly from side to side.

Seems that I read a recommendation from a respected FF model designer on HPA that the actual amount of slop (or flop  Grin) need not be great. Don't recall the specifics but remember that it was considerably less than 15 degrees either side of the top view datum line.

Might have been Duco Guru or Al Backstrom....Just not sure. Darn!  Angry


Jim (6aw6)
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