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Author Topic: from the Big Eighties...a Bostonian Canuck!  (Read 2142 times)
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frash
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« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2014, 08:57:42 PM »

Richard Ranney,

It is clear that most of your skills well exceed most of mine, but if you want competitive INDOOR (7g airframe) Bostonians look at http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_plans/details.php?image_id=2948&mode=search. This was written by Steve Gardner and is posted in the Plans section. He also wrote (early) detailed instructions for printing onto tissue. I searched for Gardner and both articles were found.

Fred Rash   
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jasa
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« Reply #26 on: June 03, 2014, 12:05:24 AM »

Mr.Ranney:
P;ease accept my apologies for being late in answering your questions.You are an expert,but if I can help you,this is what I did with the bostonian Canuck ,for the CG I balanced it with motor and propeller at the main wing spar,for decalage I follow the plans,but left the elevator trailing edge unglue to adjust it (if necessary),and since our gym is very small,I try to keep the radio of the turns to a minimum,with some adjustments of the rudder.
I don't know how large is your hall, but start with 250 to 300 turns and then go up, my Canuck was flying well with 450 turns, if you could look in You Tube under "rubbered power free flight" you will see my airplane flying for some seconds.

Jasa
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rick121x
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« Reply #27 on: June 03, 2014, 01:10:50 AM »

Fred Rash, and Jasa, thank you very much for your detailed messages. That will be just what I need. My plan is to get started on the Canuck in a couple of weeks after I get a few flights on my CL-415 seaplane (model) out on Lake Mead.

Ha,Ha... you refer to me as an expert. ROTFL ! I certainly don't know how that notion came about. ... still laughing.   Cheesy

Richard
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jasa
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« Reply #28 on: June 15, 2014, 11:11:48 AM »

Here is the video of my Canuck http://youtu.be/-AGSNytFYuE

Javier
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rick121x
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« Reply #29 on: June 15, 2014, 04:45:16 PM »

Javier: Thanks for the link... I did enjoy watching your "Canuck" in flight. Excellent power trim! And the your use of colors in the covering design is very nice. I am tempted to copy exactly. What type of tissue did you use? Also, I like Your electric winder....

I was a mechanical engineer in a previous life (Oh my gosh, that's already more than a few years ago!), and I still tend to look at any design as starting point for what it is that I would be about to do, even if that amounts to changing what is already a good design.

I was thinking of lowering the thrust line closer to the center of the nose block, allowing axial rubber motor alignment with the prop bearing - for a little less prop shaft friction. Did you have to adjust the thrust line any? And oh yes, what rubber setup did you use?

And double rudders? Although the large fuse may bathe a single rudder in turbulence, I am tempted to avoid those doubles.

My experience with No-cals tells me that any weight savings would make a significant difference. So I would be working toward that end.

Also from lots of airfoil reading lately, I think I will use 0.020 dia, carbon rod for the leading and trailing edges both wing and stabilizer.

I would love to hear comments and or any other trim suggestions you might have. Good Job!

Richard Ranney

« Last Edit: June 15, 2014, 04:56:10 PM by rick121x » Logged
frash
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« Reply #30 on: June 15, 2014, 05:03:51 PM »

I have wondered if carbon rods would work for Bostonians. Maybe you guys will find out for the rest of us. <Grin>

Fred Rash
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rick121x
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« Reply #31 on: July 07, 2014, 10:52:01 AM »

In reply to Frash's query re carbon rods for Bostonians. My first (very) informal evaluation re carbon rods for leading and trailing edges: Step one was to find that the rods are quite heavy - and then, finding that it might be possible to split the rods, understanding that the fibers are structured axially. So I simply used a razor blade and a magnifying loupe to start the split, then pushed the rod toward the blade to make the cut.

Presto, my first split carbon rod, starting with an 0.040 diameter and finishing with two nearly identical halves. Amazing! I love it. The first weighing shows the split rod to be reasonably light. ...more on this subject as I try to split a longer piece, long enough to make a wing leading edge. The four inch piece I started with is just too light for me to make good weight measurements, being in the 40 milligram region. My scales have only 10 mg resolution.

It would seem that the "halves" could be then easily split into quarters, definitely equivalent in weight to light 1/16 balsa strip, and not only more stiff, but much more resistant to breakage. I don't know if the glue joints would be strong enough, with the very small areas of the joints???

Richard Ranney
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