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Author Topic: Transferring Drawings to Wood  (Read 814 times)
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Pou Pou
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« on: March 12, 2014, 01:46:59 PM »

I down loaded some plans for a model plane. Could I get a link that explains how part drawings get transferred to the balsa wood?
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Starduster
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2014, 02:32:22 PM »

There are several different methods, and I'll let others explain how they do it, but what I do is:

1) Make extra copies of the plan

2) Cut out the parts from the plan copy

3) Paste (I use a Uhu glue stick) the paper parts onto the balsa

4) Cut the parts

5) Peel off the paper from the parts.

Only one real problem is that you want to use a light coating of glue-stick. Otherwise, it can be a challenge to peel off the paper.

Also, if it is a duplicate part (like wing ribs) I cut one from 1/16 plywood and use that as a template to cut the rest.
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mescal1
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2014, 09:19:42 PM »

I also like cutting thru the paper.  I find that it helps me follow the lines rather than the grain of the wood.  I've used the spray glues on the back of the paper but
I've found an even better way.  Actually Allan Shanzle's wife Verna found a better way.  There is a respositionable tape that is made up of these little dots, you just
roll it onto the paper and stick it to the wood.  It actually holds very well but easily peels off.  If any dots remain on the wood you can just rub it lightly and it comes
right off.  It's all I use now, you can pick up cheap refills online as well.  Here's a link to the one I use. http://www.eksuccessbrands.com/ektools/Products/HERMA_Dotto_Repositionable_Adhesive_55-00054.htm
 I'm sure that the similar ones would work just as well.  I picked mine
up at the local Michael's or A.C. Moore.  Try it!
Michael
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atesus
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2014, 01:00:05 AM »

Pretty much the same method here, but I use either Elmer’s Repositionable Glue Stick or 3M Spray Mount Artist's Adhesive (lately more the spray than the glue stick). If I apply the glue to the paper only, it doesn't leave a noticeable residue on the wood after peeling off.
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2014, 08:04:15 AM »

If you have them printed on paper via laser printer, the drawings can be transferred a couple of ways.

Ironing - Hard backing board, paper clamped face down over balsa sheet and ironed (I don't use the steam setting).

Solvent - same setup but wet a paper towel with acetone or lacquer thinner and DOB the babper.
    Don't wipe!

Obviously both of these tricks reverse the images.  
That may or may not be a problem.
If it IS a problem, flip the image (image editing program) before printing.


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wordguy
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2014, 09:05:30 AM »

I also use re-positionable spray adhesive - the knock-off brands seem to work fine and are less expensive than 3M.  I spray the paper, not the wood, and let it dry for a couple of minutes before sticking the paper to the balsa. Any residue comes right off with lighter fluid.  Downside:  pretty fierce "aroma" and if any overspray gets ... anywhere ... you have a sticky mess.   If it gets on the floor/carpet, you will be in trouble with SWMBO.  I leave the paper in place until the part is completely finished, i.e., notches, etc. made.  I find that the paper provides some helpful support for small parts.
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C/L Gee Bee
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« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2014, 05:13:28 PM »

If you have them printed on paper via laser printer, the drawings can be transferred a couple of ways.

Ironing - Hard backing board, paper clamped face down over balsa sheet and ironed (I don't use the steam setting).

Solvent - same setup but wet a paper towel with acetone or lacquer thinner and DOB the babper.
    Don't wipe!

Obviously both of these tricks reverse the images.  
That may or may not be a problem.
If it IS a problem, flip the image (image editing program) before printing.

<<This was the best way to go, except that I covered the airframe with clear 'Fas-Cal', and the numbers on the ribs were all reversed. The other guys at the flying field told me the whole wing was backwards, the whole plane, in fact!
They sent me looking for a reverse-pitched prop. LOL>>



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OZPAF
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« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2014, 08:37:11 PM »

If too much glue stick has been used on the paper patterns, swab with Methylated Spirits(killed spirits), rubbing alcohol or similar to soften the glue and enabling the paper to be removed without damaging the balsa.

John
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« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2014, 07:42:37 AM »

 Sad.  I dropped my computer and must retype

What I do is I cut a blank the height and width of the part I want then measure it physically against both the plan and the actual model where it is to fit. I then make adjustments accordingly . Let's face it minor inaccuracies in a build can throw a lot of pre assembly parts out into the trash.

Next I then locate the side keel on a fuselage former or bottom spar on the wing rib and take out my mark 1 eyeball 3000
And cut the shape out. I do compare it to the out line required and if TLAR I  make a duplicate of the part for the other side and install the part.

Jim Roll Eyes
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Modelace
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« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2014, 03:03:04 AM »

I use a paper copy but use rubber cement (an office supply item) to adhere the paper pattern. Rubber cement releases easily and any residue will roll up like a ball with a little finger pressure. I find no need to "number" the parts..if you do not know where they fit you are not ready to scratch build.
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« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2014, 10:35:11 PM »

This photo should show a Xerox copy deposited on the wood using xylene as a thinner.  You place the ink side down on the balsa and wick the xylene through the paper using a small pad of Kleenex. The secret is the use of xylene instead of lacquer thinner or acetone.
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Re: Transferring Drawings to Wood
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« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2014, 10:57:31 PM »

I have used all of the above mentioned methods except using xylene instead of acetone. I'll have to try that. My favorite is the paper template method using Elmer's repositionable glue stick. Another more crude method is to place a piece of carbon paper between the plan and the wood and trace the part. 
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« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2014, 07:31:14 AM »

If you do decide to use Xylene, be aware of the bio-hazards - VERY good ventilation and protective clothing (gloves and glasses).  Do NOT pour the remains down the drain!
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« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2014, 12:04:18 AM »

Acetone and lacquer thinner work fine for me.
Xylene is a bit more toxic than I like to keep around the house.
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« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2018, 06:53:09 PM »

if i want permenant templates i cut out copied shapes and trace onto cereal box cardboard, its thin enough to allow fine cutting and thick enough to allow easy tracing onto wood.
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« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2018, 03:19:23 PM »

The method I use is to take tracing paper and put it over the part I want to trace.  Then cut out the paper tracing and transfer it over to the balsa sheeting for instance and trace out the part on the balsa.  Its saves the original plans and uses no harsh chemicals. 

CT
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Starduster
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« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2018, 03:30:18 PM »

If I'm doing a one-off airplane, what I'll do is create a .pdf of the parts sheets (from a CAD model, or make a copy and save it as a .pdf) and then take that .pdf to my local FEDEX office store. They have (at least mine does) 8 1/2 X 11.00 "clear sticky back" I have them print the sheet(s) onto that sticky back.

It's then just a matter of peel-and-stick onto the balsa sheet and cut away. The sticky back peels of easily.


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Hughs Aircraft
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« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2018, 04:18:47 PM »

My method which is not original is to print the parts images on to esaki tissue and then bond these images on to the balsa with glue stick. I also bond plain esaki on to the back side of the balsa. When the parts are cut out, the edges of the parts do not break off as long as the bonding to the tissue is good. I leave the tissue in place because the weight gain in negligible. I may have seen this method on Hip Pocket Aeronautics but I am not sure.
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« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2018, 10:02:19 AM »

The methods mentioned are great for one-off parts.  For multiples like ribs I use these methods to create a template from plywood or Plexiglass.  You need to be careful that the part doesn't grow by repeatedly including the thickness of the lines used to draw the plan.  Sometimes I will use this method to make one-off parts if I think I might make another plane or if I need to make an extensive repair.
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« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2018, 01:46:40 PM »

In a pinch, I use the pinhole method.  Lay the plans over the part (maybe tape it down for security).  Take a pin and poke the outline onto the wood.  Remove the plan and connect the dots.
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« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2018, 01:50:05 PM »

Same as strat-o, but with a carbon copy paper between the plan and the wood to show off better.

Urs
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