Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin  |  Contact Global Moderator
August 18, 2018, 07:01:38 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Flying Control Line Models Alone?  (Read 3625 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
cessnadriver
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 17


Topic starter


Ignore
« on: April 07, 2009, 09:41:50 PM »

Is it practical to fly control line airplanes unassisted, i.e., no helper? If so what techniques might be used to hold the airplane while "running" to grab the handle? Is some sort of throttle cut-off required? Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.

Cessnadriver.
Logged
slipstick
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 7
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 209



Ignore
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2009, 03:40:55 AM »

There's a device called a "stooge" which holds the plane until you choose to release it. I believe Brodak sells one. Here's a recent discussion about them from Stuka Stunt http://clstunt.com/htdocs/dc/dcboard.php?az=show_topic&forum=103&topic_id=329893

Alternatively these days electric C/L is more possible and that makes it much easier to arrange a way to switch the motor on and off from the handle. That's for me Wink.

Steve
Logged
cessnadriver
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 17


Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2009, 09:33:52 AM »

Thanks Steve,

The experience related there is very entertaining, while totally believable. I guess if one is going to fly by himself he needs to follow a check list before each launch, and keep his cell phone handy, with "911" programmed in.

Electric is definitely the way to go these days but I have these old Cox engines, and a McCoy .19 (all from my youth) that I would like to run again. Maybe I should just run them on the "bench" and build an electric CL plane to fly.

I will check out Brodak.

Regards,

Al
"cessnadriver"
Logged
faif2d
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 29
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,126


Sun came up I was here to see it = good day



Ignore
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2009, 10:40:28 AM »

It is also possible to launch a combat plane with a stooge. The one pictured uses the block from a foam core as a holding device. Even better is a piece of rug clipped to a workmate with a board at the TE of the wing. On both of these to launch you simply step back and pull the plane out of the holder. The power to weight ratio is so high on these models that they will start flying almost immediately.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Flying Control Line Models Alone?
Logged

I used to like painting with dope but now I can't remember why!    Steve Fauble
simpleflyer
OOS, July 2018
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 9
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 102


Simpleflying is fun.

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2009, 03:18:18 PM »

Hi Al in AA,

We're away from home for a couple more days. When we get back, I'll post a couple sketches of 'home-made' stooges for flying CL models, either here or at the SF group. These can be used in the backyard as well.

Al the SF
Logged

Al Locker USA - Will be missed by all that knew him.
Hepcat
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 257
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 1,767



Ignore
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2009, 05:04:53 PM »

I used the usual stooges with no trouble about half a century ago when I flew control line but tell me - did anyone use the method proposed in the sketch below? I guess it would work on a smooth bit of ground but I think it might be a good idea to take a spare pair of trousers with you when you try it for the first time.

John
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Flying Control Line Models Alone?
Logged
cessnadriver
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 17


Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2009, 08:00:45 PM »

Thanks Hepcat,

If I understand your sketch you seem to be referring to flying control line from outside the circle. I think I've seen something similar to that at Toys R Us, or on line somewhere, involving a small battery powered airplane that is flown indoors from outside the flight circle. My CL experience is also from 50 years ago, and even then was quite limited, but I would think that the main drawback to standing (kneeling?) outside the circle would be that there is no way to "take steps back" to compensate for wind in order to keep the lines tight. Also, getting the lines to the outside without interfering with the flight path might require some novel ideas. I'm sorry if I misunderstood your drawing and would like to hear more about what you are referring to.

Cessnadriver AKA Al (in Ann Arbor)
Logged
applehoney
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 260
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 3,081




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2009, 08:45:12 PM »

flying control line from outside the circle.

No - the theory is (was) that on release the model would describe a nice smooth arc, with tight lines, until it was directly opposite the pilot who would then have full control and could take off and fly normally. It didn't allow for the airplane turning into the circle, especially if the surface was rough .... or lifting off prematurely and then auguring in .. .and if all went well then I guess there's a subsequent chance of wrapping the lines around that (presumably short) post in the middle distance or having it trap them on landing, with a predictable result. Otherwise . . the idea's fine .... Grin
Logged
cessnadriver
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 17


Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2009, 08:58:02 AM »

Ahhhhh....I get it now. Seems like a very clever idea, but if anyone plans to experiment with it I think that wearing full "Hockey Gear" (except the skates) might be in order until the "bugs" are worked out. As a novice I'm inclinded to stick with the "stooge".

Al (AA)
Logged
jam486
Copper Member
**

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 4



Ignore
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2009, 07:24:53 PM »

i have a brodak stooge and it works great but i mostly fly 1/2 A due to space constraints (Maine field with plenty of rocks and tree lines) i also have a old cox pt 19 that i love to fly as it brings back a simpler time. it has a notch in the bellcrank that you attach a clip to it releases with down elevator and works pretty good. jim w
Logged
Bargle
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 21
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 668




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2009, 09:22:05 PM »

Here's my crude, but effective (at least for me) method that I used with my .049 stuff.
I took a piece of 3/4" plywood, at least 2 foot square and drove 2 nails in a slight angle, parallel to the rear edge of the board and a few inches from it. the plane would have a length of line tied to the tail skid with a wire loop at the end. Another nail, with a length of line at least as long as the control lines was tied to that. That was the release line. The plane was set in front of the 2 nails on the board and the string with the wire loop was passed between the 2 nails in the board. The release line nail was then inserted through the wire loop on the opposite side of the board nails and the plane pulled forward to trap the string nail against the 2 board nails. Control lines and the release line were checked to be clear of each other at the pilot's position. The engine was started, then you run out, pick up the control and release line. Once you checked the control lines were operating OK, a quick tug on the release line would pull the nail out of the wire loop, releasing the plane.
It's a lot simpler than I make it sound. While it worked fine with my .049 stuff, I doubt it would be a good idea on larger ones.
Logged
julio
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 17
Offline Offline

Argentina Argentina

Posts: 343



Ignore
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2009, 01:10:53 PM »

...I guess it would work on a smooth bit of ground but I think it might be a good idea to take a spare pair of trousers with you when you try it for the first time.
John

 Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin!!!
Logged

I think I will stay a novice forever.
perttime
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

Finland Finland

Posts: 308



Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 23, 2011, 09:40:56 AM »

did anyone use the method proposed in the sketch below?
...
StevensAero - SpoolUP! Control Line Self Launch Device

Features:
- Suitable for 1/2A and other sub 16 oz. Control Line Models
- Allows pilot to self-launch control line model
- Pilot is never absent from the flight controls
- Simple reliable launching every flight!

Includes:
- Launching Spool
- Spool Stake
- Steel Control Handle Peg

Requires:
- Rubber Mallet
http://www.stevensaero.com/StevensAero-SpoolUP-Control-Line-Self-Launch-Device-SAK-SPOOLUP-p-17632.html

Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nkvfagsvz_A
Logged
John-99
Guest

« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2011, 05:01:32 PM »

    The take off from around a stake/peg/screwdriver/SpoolUP! Control Line Self Launch Device is pretty easy. 

    The spool up instructions tell you to use a small (less than 16 oz.) plane.  From my experience years ago, the plane gives a jerk or strong tug as it is going from the "small" circle to the large one.  It shouldn't because the two circles are tangent, however, it always did for me.  This is a bit of a shock if you don't know about it and have a big plane on the end of the lines.
Logged
flyingagin
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 39




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2012, 06:04:53 PM »

I used a stooge back in the late 80s
It mounted to my flight box with two bolts through 2 slots in the stooge back plate and could be adjusted up and down by loosening the bolts. There were three vertical parallel boards about 2” inches wide with a bunch of holes drilled in parallel through all three. Two of the vertical boards (towards the outside) were only about 1” apart. The 3rd one (nearest pilot) was maybe 2” from the middle one. The holes were big enough for a piece of 1/8” music wire (my anchor wire) to easily pass through, but not a lot of slop. The anchor wire had a loop on the end towards the pilot with a string tied to the loop (bright string helps here) and extended to where the pilot stood. I tied the string to a stick at the far end that I could later roll the pull line up on.
On the back of the airplane I very securely imbedded a piece of 1/16 music wire with a loop on the end just past the rearmost part of the plane. That had 2 purposes. 1 it made a nice attachment to hang the plane up by.
2 But its real purpose was for the stooges anchor wire to pass through and hold the plane till I pulled the string to release the plane, after a last control check.
It never failed and was super easy to make and use.
Here are the only pics I have. Hope they come through.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Flying Control Line Models Alone?
Re: Flying Control Line Models Alone?
Logged

"As for Me and My House, We Will Serve the Lord"
Joshua 24:15
greggles47
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 276




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2012, 06:07:55 AM »

Ideally you shouldn't fly alone, there are many dangers that can bring you undone. Yes I've done it & payed the penalty. Good thing I can drive my car one handed, with the other a bloody paw.  Embarrassed

But we do these things because it'll never happen to us - right!

If you do, be sure to use a proper stooge - not the wrap around a screwdriver trick, there's way too many ways that can bite you. It might even be worth taking the other half to read a book or something while you fly. That way if you get wounded she's there to patch you up, and then laugh at you! Undecided

Regards

G
Logged

There must be some way out of here, said the joker to the thief,
There's too much confusion, I can't get no relief
Olbill
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 54
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 2,317



Ignore
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2012, 12:11:54 PM »

    The spool up instructions tell you to use a small (less than 16 oz.) plane.  From my experience years ago, the plane gives a jerk or strong tug as it is going from the "small" circle to the large one.  It shouldn't because the two circles are tangent, however, it always did for me.  This is a bit of a shock if you don't know about it and have a big plane on the end of the lines.

It would probably require an analysis from the esteemed Hepcat (or maybe my physicist friend Leo) to correctly explain this but at first glance it would appear that at the "tangent" point the centripetal force caused by the model is being cut in half and that therefore the pull would reduce by half. OTOH the model has an angular velocity of its own. When the lines unhook from the peg the model at that instant is going to try to maintain its rotation in the same way that a discus glider is rotating at the point of release. In the case of the discus glider the rudder takes a huge hit at the point of release and corrects the flight path. You can look at any number of videos of glider launches to see this effect. I don't think I'm smart enough to know how this would impact the line pull on a C/L model.
Logged
Olbill
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 54
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 2,317



Ignore
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2012, 12:34:31 PM »

While trying to make sure I knew what I was talking about I ran across this very clever simulation of the centripetal forces involved:

http://www.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/oldjava/circularMotion/circular3D_e.html
Logged
flyingagin
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 39




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2012, 09:43:27 PM »

Have not used a stooge since in over 20 years. Much more fun flying with others. But there have been times when I was either going to fly by myself or not fly at all. Rc I can (and do) start at idle) and use a holder. I always use a strong and secure plane holder now. I was testing a engine out on the plane in my front yard, with out a restraint and got nailed really bad. Next day I had to wash the blood off the side of my van. I drove myself to E.R. A heck of a lot more careful now. But a stooge or some sort of plane holder will restrain the plane. Now IF you can just keep your hands clear 100% of the time Grin And I always have a cell phone on me when out flying, even with others. At least you can call for help (if you are not in a cell hole a course).
The engines are not the only danger out flying, Very nearly got hit by a rattle snake once. I fortunatly was carring the plane wing down and the snake bounced off the wing. I needed a change of pants after that Grin Grin
Now a days if I were to use a stooge to fly cl I would use a rc engine on it so I could start it at idle.
I get more cautious as I get older.
Always be very aware of were you hands are and never take your eyes off that prop. Believe me, it has your name on it, and loves to bite.
When teaching my son to fly and start the motors I did dry rehearsals with him on the proper and safe method of starting the motor and emphasized my points by show him the scars I earned and how they happened.
And if any one is considering flying alone, think through the safety issue first. The life you safe could be your own. You cut an artery and no help there you are now in big trouble.
Logged

"As for Me and My House, We Will Serve the Lord"
Joshua 24:15
Stefoc
Copper Member
**

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

Italy Italy

Posts: 4



Ignore
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2012, 04:16:46 AM »

Hi, i attach an image of a simple stooge designed by Pino Carbini, completely made of wood.

Stefano C.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Flying Control Line Models Alone?
Logged
ekitten2
Copper Member
**

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 6



Ignore
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2013, 06:07:33 PM »

all i use to use (in my youth) was an old screwdriver  dug into ground so that outbord tailplane would contact it  and plane would hold itself (required a undercarrage tho) then you simply walked to handel  and pulled plane towards you  so tailplane  slid off  screwdriver  handel

but that all said  im currently desighning a 'stooge"of my own design that will "flip" any plane into the air 1/2a to 40 size...

more info to follow...gazza
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!