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Author Topic: Peck Polymers Prairie Bird build, 1st embryo  (Read 477 times)
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Jonoton
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« on: August 28, 2017, 10:36:28 AM »

Hello all,

Construction has begun on a Peck Prairie Bird. This is my first Embryo model, and it comes close on the heels of a Peck Pup Bostonian. For the Bostonian, I just built it as true as I could and did not make real efforts to minimize weight. Initial flights show promise, but I have 3.8g to lose to meet minimum.
For the PBird, I will be trying to build lite. Also, I am using fixtures to ease alignment and prevent rework, as I broke fuselage crossmembers a number of times joining the two sides on the Pup.

Pics soon!

Following the PBird, I have a Peck Peanut Pietenpol to build - a first Peanut scale model.
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Jonoton
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2017, 03:43:22 PM »

The Prairie Bird is coming right along.

I'm writing down the interesting bits of the build and methodology, because I hope to be teaching some kids. Also, I don't have many built-up stick and tissue models under my belt, so I am figuring out what works as I go.

I happened to have made some sanding blocks which were reasonably square, and I used these as jigs to tape the fuselage sides to for joining. Compared to free-handing with the bottom pinned to the board (as I did with the Bostonian), this is a far easier and quicker process which, for me anyways, produced a better end result.
Also, Sig Bond is a much better choice than the usual CA glue I am used to - and it gets tacky so quickly, I doubt that CA would save me any time. I have a narrow spray bottle cap with maybe an 1/8th ounce of glue and a few drops of water, which I dip a pin in for application. I tape over the opening between use, and it has lasted the whole build with most left.

So, to recap what I have realized thus far -
1. Make  simple jigs if possible.
2. Use aliphatic resin (Sig Bond or other - I like SIG and buy their stuff when I can)
3. Sand each and every joint square or to the proper angle. Save time by cutting each crossmember just a hair oversize, and then batch sand them and match the upper and lower crossmembers. For the dozen or so crossmembers forward of the fuselage section, make a master and then match the other 11 to it.

Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Peck Polymers Prairie Bird build, 1st embryo
Re: Peck Polymers Prairie Bird build, 1st embryo
Re: Peck Polymers Prairie Bird build, 1st embryo
Re: Peck Polymers Prairie Bird build, 1st embryo
Re: Peck Polymers Prairie Bird build, 1st embryo
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Wind-it-up
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2017, 10:53:11 PM »

Hi Jonoton - you've picked an excellent Embryo model with the Prairie Bird...and I'm not just saying that because I own the company that makes the kits!  It seems everyone has had good performance with this model (even me! Grin).  We hear about long flights and OOS stories all the time with the Prairie Bird.

You have a good idea using wood blocks as squaring guides. I also cut sticks oversize and sand to fit. Doing crossmembers in twos is a great way to make proper box shapes also!

I'm enjoying your posts and look forward to your results with this and your other Peck kits!  Wink

Chuck Imbergamo
Wind-it-up Enterprises (new owners of Peck-Polymers)
www.Peck-Polymers.com
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ZK-AUD
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2017, 11:43:45 PM »

Hello all,


For the PBird, I will be trying to build lite. Also, I am using fixtures to ease alignment and prevent rework, as I broke fuselage crossmembers a number of times joining the two sides on the Pup.

  If you want to add some lightness to your P bird make up a nice big long flat sanding block - say a 1/3 of a sheet of 220 grit sandpaper and now gently sand the fuselage sides top and bottom,  particularly towards the back.   Don't go crazy but you can remove a lot of weight that way.
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Jonoton
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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2017, 10:42:25 AM »

Chuck,

16 or so years ago the first stick and tissue models I built were Peck ROGs and Stringless Wonders, in an after school 'Things That Fly' class put together by two great teachers at my school. So I will always have a soft spot for Peck Polymers, and I was glad to see it was back in business when I got bit by the model building bug again a few months ago. Keep up the good work!

ZK: I did just that, but did not get very aggressive this time around. The Bird is all covered now, awaiting dope.

Thanks,

Jonathan
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Wind-it-up
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2017, 11:09:32 PM »

My story is similar- my first Peck model was an ROG, but it was -ahem- a few years before you. Roll Eyes

I'm glad to be carrying on the tradition and happy for all the support we get from model builders like you!

Looking forward to seeing your Bird.
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