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Author Topic: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)  (Read 3252 times)
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Sky9pilot
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« Reply #25 on: October 07, 2015, 01:43:42 PM »

Ditto what Don said...this is really an intriguing model.  Love the plunge molded nose and the nacelles are top notch!  The Connie will benefit lots from this build.
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bcarter1234
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« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2015, 02:46:52 PM »

Don and Tom,

Thanks for the comments. This little plane should make doing the similar operations on the Connie seem a bit easier by comparison. I preferred to make my mistakes on something I didn't have as much time in.

I love to look at and watch Peanuts fly but this would have been much less fiddly at double the span. There are two things that appeal to me about Peanuts outside of the building aspect. They look like they shouldn't perform as well as they do so you get a little bit of magic from that and the flights look more "epic" in a given area due in part to the smaller scale.   

I will say I'm liking the results of using smaller sections of heavier stock. The overall weight seems to stay reasonably low but it doesn't feel delicate when you handle it the way soft balsa often does. We'll see if I take it all back when it comes time to cover. It was very tempting to do the nacelles from sticks but the sheet was easy, smooth, strong and not much if any heavier than using sticks. It's amazing how much I resent even a tenth of a gram at this scale. On the plus side it makes me watch my weight on the larger planes too.

It's strictly a taste thing but seeing planes fly in the fashion Dave Rees' planes flew still awes me. One of my other favorite videos is the one of David Aronstein's Tupolev ANT-25. It just looks impossible that they stay in the air at those speeds. 
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bcarter1234
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« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2015, 09:32:18 AM »

Made up a small jig to shape the top rear section of the nacelles.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151011_144818_zps56fdn7u6.jpg

After sanding to shape.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151011_151816_zpsm7uotjzo.jpg

Sitting in place.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151011_152636_zpspbylrg8i.jpg

For the the much larger lower rear nacelle I'm going to try turning them from foam using a dremel. The extra fairing which the covers the landing gear will be shaped and glued to the turned part, then the hollowed out as a single unit. 
 
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
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bcarter1234
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« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2015, 09:50:32 AM »

Turning these foam blanks on a dremel wasn't so bad once watching them fly across the shop several times convinced me that gluing the blanks to a 1/32" ply faceplate would not work. I twisted an 1/8" drill bit about an 1-1/2" into the 2" blank. This leaves a very loose fit so I took some thin slivers of depron and pushed them in around the base of the bit to snug it up. Alignment isn't critical as turning them will true them up automatically. The whole operation takes less than 5 minutes per nacelle. No glue was used and they come off the bit easily when you are done.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151012_205207_zpsy7kkxzj6.jpg 

I think you could put a split blank around a larger mandrel and using a drill press or lathe turn a hollow foam fuselage this way. You just need to pick a subject that has a symmetrical round section fuselage. Wink   

Here they are fitted to the wing. A section was sliced off and then the rough cut surface is sanded to flatness by running them over a piece of sandpaper stuck to the table.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151012_213323_zps20gmostv.jpg

Next I need to form the fairings that go over the landing gear and the prominent scoops on the bottom. 

The plan is to cover the wing, trim tissue away, add the nacelles and then finish the covering. All my plans are subject to change.
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
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bcarter1234
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« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2015, 09:35:34 PM »

I couldn't see my way from the shape of the rear nacelle halves as shown above to where I hoped to go so it was time for another try.
It started with turning this on the dremel.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_204718_zps1aylxz7j.jpg
The sides were sanded to match the plan view of the earlier attempt.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_205254_zpsyhy6jwa3.jpg
Here is the current state.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_212204_zpsn1l3zq1t.jpg
It should be possible to use these to hold the rear motor pegs.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_212321_zpsoeumfwbo.jpg
One down one to go.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_212359_zpspbrtdygn.jpg
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
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Don McLellan
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« Reply #30 on: October 13, 2015, 09:52:13 PM »

Hi Brent,

When you turn the parts with your dremel, do you use sand paper?  If so what grit etc?

Don
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bcarter1234
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« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2015, 09:45:46 AM »

Don,

I use 80 grit to get me close and then 120 or 150 to get down to the final dimensions. 240 will put a nice smooth surface on them. Use very little pressure on the paper. I don't even have my hand directly behind it, I just push a piece of folded paper up against it and that is sufficient pressure to do the job. 

This plug started at 1.375" x 1.375" x 2.5". I twisted the 1/8" drill bit in by hand but you could probably do it with a drill at low rpm. To snug the fit for turning I spiral wrapped a piece of masking tape to the bit and reinserted it. The turning would probably be even easier on a drill press as the lowest speed of my antique dremel is still pretty fast. 
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Don McLellan
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« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2015, 11:54:08 AM »

Thanks Brent.  I have the same problem with my dremel.  It is either 'off', or 'warp 2' speed.
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Prosper
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« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2015, 01:21:37 PM »

Very daring and admirable stuff Brent, kudos. Normally I can't follow threads with imbedded pictures, my internet speed won't allow the page to load, but occasionally I can get a look in!

Stephen.
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« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2015, 05:31:23 PM »

Stephen,

Thanks for the kind words. My efforts appear as impressionism to your photorealism. Wink But you keep me inspired. 
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bcarter1234
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« Reply #35 on: October 16, 2015, 09:25:11 AM »

The foam piece for the second nacelle is now made.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_212321_zpsoeumfwbo.jpg
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151014_203449_zpsdtr7rtfe.jpg

I have two options for the rear peg location.
1) 3" of hook to peg with a conventional small aluminum tube for the peg. The room at the back will be pretty tight. 
2) 2-1/2" hook to peg using a bobbin and trying the "wobbly peg".

Any thoughts on which is likely to give the best motor run? Keep in mind these will be 3" props.
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
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bcarter1234
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« Reply #36 on: October 20, 2015, 09:23:43 AM »

The motor peg mounts are installed, I went with 2-1/2" peg to hook and room for bobbins. I used foam safe CA to glue some small 1/32" balsa reinforcements inside the foam nacelles and drilled for the 1/16" aluminum tubing to pass through. As is my practice a drop of CA was then applied to each piece of balsa to harden it. On the fourth one a much larger drop went on, ran onto the foam and ate through it. So much for foam safe. The damaged area was cut out to square edges and a new piece of foam was glued in its place and shaped. No harm just a good half hour wasted for taking the shortcut of putting the glue on from the bottle.

Current state. Fuselage covered wet in 2 pieces using gluestick.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151020_090859_zpsykfldoj3.jpg

Wings covered dry with gluestick, four pieces so far, many more to come. No shrinking yet.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151020_090923_zpssfk6lbcu.jpg
 
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
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Sky9pilot
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« Reply #37 on: October 20, 2015, 05:00:32 PM »

Brent...looking good.  Sorry to hear about the foam, but you'll have that handled easily with your skills!
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« Reply #38 on: October 27, 2015, 08:57:26 AM »

Some progress has been made since the last post. Here is a closeup of the nacelle. The foam bulges out slightly as it goes over the side of the balsa.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151024_094741_zpsdqjxczbj.jpg

The solution was to trim a small rectangle of the foam away so it could blend into the balsa without the bulge. You can also see the patch from the glue damage referred to in an earlier post.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151024_095015_zpsefw3sht6.jpg

Foam piece ready to install.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151024_094643_zpsuvhsuou6.jpg

6.5 grams as shown. I'm hoping to stay under 10 grams flying weight without rubber. This should work well with approximately 30 square inches of wing area. 
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151027_082637_zpsfvcbjoax.jpg

The top foam parts are not glued on yet. I still need to put tissue on the four foam parts, shrink the wing covering and then tissue the gaps including wing fillets. The tissue on the tail was preshrunk without a frame twice, ironed and then applied. I'll probably mist it and see if the frames can handle the remaining shrinkage.

The spinners are about half complete, still need to notch for the prop blades and bend the wires.
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
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Wout Moerman
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« Reply #39 on: December 09, 2015, 02:44:15 AM »

Wow, nice project!

You asked about the pitch for twin props. The p/d can indeed be higher. The area of the combined prop disks is 40% bigger than a single prop. The p/d can than also be up to 40% bigger. Or in simple terms: use the same pitch as on a 40% bigger prop.
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