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Author Topic: OOOH LORDY, does it suck!  (Read 5955 times)
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sprogs
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« on: September 07, 2015, 02:29:30 PM »

So there I was at the steep hill start. My back seats were folded up to allow me to put my models in. In the manual for the car, it seems that it states that there are straps to hold up the folded back seats. Thank you, you rat faced mean spirited tight arsed little turd who owned the car before me for taking them out. As I set off up the hill, I heard Mother gravity, in her incarnation of "The Dump Truck", swing my rear seats down, whilst unfolding, onto my:-
!/ Icon. Not made anymore but loved very much by me.
2/ FW 190, a plane hat has helped me learn to land more than any other.
3/ My lovely bungee launched glider that I got from my good friend Michael, I've not had it long, but I've had so much pleasure from it. Michael's a lovely man and it also has his presence with it.
I know the planes weren't worth much in terms of money, but they had a lot of personal value to me. The friends whose hands they have passed through stay with them in spirit.
SO!
GRAVITY!!!!!
Just cool it O.K?
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The interface between air and ground has no thickness at all. So why do I always find room for my aircraft there ?
ghostler
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« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2015, 06:13:08 AM »

So there I was at the steep hill start. My back seats were folded up to allow me to put my models in. In the manual for the car, it seems that it states that there are straps to hold up the folded back seats. Thank you, you rat faced mean spirited tight arsed little turd who owned the car before me for taking them out. As I set off up the hill, I heard Mother gravity, in her incarnation of "The Dump Truck", swing my rear seats down, whilst unfolding, onto my:-
  • 1/ Icon. Not made anymore but loved very much by me.
  • 2/ FW 190, a plane hat has helped me learn to land more than any other.
  • 3/ My lovely bungee launched glider that I got from my good friend Michael, I've not had it long, but I've had so much pleasure from it. Michael's a lovely man and it also has his presence with it.
I know the planes weren't worth much in terms of money, but they had a lot of personal value to me. The friends whose hands they have passed through stay with them in spirit. SO GRAVITY!!!!! Just cool it O.K?

Ouch! Seat backs and models don't mix well. I hope you devise a way to keep your rear seat locked in the upright position. I also hope you are able to rebuild the models that got damaged.
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George Hostler
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« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2015, 08:30:40 AM »

no doubt whatever! commit to resurrecting those busted pieces... and you will also find a fixed man in the process!
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ghostler
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2015, 11:07:49 AM »

Perhaps Michael being the gentleman he is, help Sprogs to repair her lovely models or so they were? Repairs are inevitable with these temporary balsa creations. I've had many a fine model fade away over time due to various fates, mischievous or not.

Here's a book going back some years, which I used to borrow from the local libraries that I frequented. In it Keith Laumer, the author and prolific writer explains how to perform a few repairs. I remember checking it out some 50 years ago, along with Walt Musciano's books of similar design.

How to Design and Build Flying Models
http://outerzone.co.uk/books/list_chapters.asp?book=4

It states 1975, but was written and issued in the 1960's.
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George Hostler
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sprogs
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« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2015, 03:09:09 PM »

Thanks, Ghostler.
A couple of friends I fly with, (Thank you especially, Paul) Helped me get the Icon and fw 190 back together, (Then the Bl&*dy wheel fell off!), And the glider from Michael seems to be far less maimed than I had thought.
At the day's end, the loveliest moments were when you made that one, perfect three pointer and your friends all called out "Yeeeessss!"
When you forgot your transmitter and a friend said "I'LL set up a channel for you on mine"
When you hit the planet at the wrong angle, and the carrier bags came out, and your friends helped you pick up the pieces and commiserated with you.
That day, when all went right, and the sunset was perfect as you came in for that last landing, and you went home knowing that tomorrow, it might happen again.
To all my friends,
xxx
Liz
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Art356A
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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2015, 04:00:40 PM »

Thanks, George, I never knew that Outerzone had books.

a.
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« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2015, 05:31:25 PM »

Liz,
   If its any comfort, we've all had days ( or soon to have ) like that. I recall once I had just finished
a project that took me months to complete and I thought it was going to send me to the idiot house
for the amount of detail I had put on it. I mean from a distance it could have passed for a real plane.
I was so proud of my work that I wanted to show it off to my wife and say "look what I've done". Well
I picked up my plane, turned around and not even half a step, walked into my eldest son and heard a
terrible crushing crunch that still makes me sick to this day.  What I learned that day was besides the
wonderful colorful words chosen at random and in rapid succession is to always check behind you before
picking up a plane or project and running to a loved one and saying: "See what I did!"

Skyraider
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« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2015, 12:11:23 PM »

sorry Liz, I meant a "fixed woman" in the process... anyway save all the wreckage, then when you have gotten over the trauma get back to the bench and begin the fixing.

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« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2015, 03:46:49 PM »

oh and another thing that might help in a zen-like way, don't get yourself attached to your models.
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Pops
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« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2016, 01:34:20 PM »

Once upon a time a modeler friend of mine borrowed my compressor. He just wanted me to stash it in the back of his Voyager and then he closed the hatch and drove off. A day or so I asked him if we should go flying, but he just gave me that irritated look and didn't say anithing. Pursueing the question, he told me that on his way home he had been forced to break hard and the compressor had slid forward and crushed his airplane! Fortunately it was a styrofoam model and could be fixed with a squirt of glue. And we've had many good flying sessions after that.
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Pops
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sprogs
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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2016, 01:58:00 PM »

Hi Pops.
My Icon, though now mostly uhu por, is still giving me the pleasure it has given since the first time I made a real flight and a proper landing with it. I've even flown off the sea at Middleton sands , Morecambe and the joy was almost more than I can bear to remember. Michael's glider still soars beautifully despite the presence of an incompetent pilot, the FW 190, though, still can't keep it's undercarriage to itself and insists on sharing it with Lancashire on each flight. If you're ever over this way you might find a piece of it!
Liz
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The interface between air and ground has no thickness at all. So why do I always find room for my aircraft there ?
Pops
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So many plans and planes, so little time...



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« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2016, 11:02:59 AM »

oh and another thing that might help in a zen-like way, don't get yourself attached to your models.

Fat chance... Cheesy

I'm attached to my airplanes, and proud of it! I've spent time, money, sweat and tears to build and repair them - and a few of them are even a product of my imagination so to speak, since I started by making a plan and constructing the plane from that. So yes, I'm attached to my airplanes and proud of it! Smiley

Liz;
Haha, that "sharing it with Lancashire" is a part I recognize, reminds me of my first E-starter! I didn't know to fly (I still don't!) and that eventually model was so chewed up that it was no longer airworthy, it also shared parts as it flew along. But as far as I can remember, that's the only "complete" model I've ever discarded (when I moved the last time). But boy, was that pile of styrofoam a ton of fun! Smiley
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Pops
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sprogs
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« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2016, 02:09:34 PM »

HI Pops
That's the one big advantage of Styrofoam and depron etc, when, after your first few seconds of flight, the Emergency rescue carrier bag team" is called out, instead of weeks of repair at home the "I've got a tube of uhu por" team comes into full play and within ten minutes, the aircraft, the carrier bag and the "uhu por "team are fully bonded. Once the "I've got a modelling knife" standby man has done his job, All is ready for yet another attempt at flight.
I firmly believe that if the Brothers Wright had had the advantage of Uhu Por and carrier bags they would have discovered powered flights secrets years earlier, while simultaneously developing a permanent bond between them.
XX
Liz
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The interface between air and ground has no thickness at all. So why do I always find room for my aircraft there ?
Pops
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« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2016, 07:49:01 PM »

Haha! I would not be surprised! Grin
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Pops
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« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2016, 06:28:43 AM »

oh and another thing that might help in a zen-like way, don't get yourself attached to your models.


Can't help it sometimes when I use cyno for a repair!

That's it Liz, old girl, stiff upper lip,  jolly hockey sticks and all that.

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sprogs
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« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2016, 01:11:15 PM »

Hi Everyone
Just found this old thread and I thought I might update it. My Icon, now 97% uhu por, has returned home in a (SMALL) carrier bag three times since last we spoke, I still fly it out of preference to all my others and would dearly love a newer one. My favourite moment was when on the beach recently, I was flying my Icon and my friend Geoff was flying his multi billion dollar jet.
Our paths were on a possible collision course and I heard a voice shout over the engine noise, "Look out Geoff, there's three and a half quids worth of foam and glue coming your way !"
I've been flying that three and a half quid's worth for about three and a half years now, I think that's pretty good fun for money. When it dies I'm going to bury it at the sands, let the molluscs have a go !
Luv
liz
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