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Author Topic: Cone drawing program  (Read 1283 times)
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3view
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« on: September 26, 2015, 03:58:28 PM »

I use a computer drawing program to make conical shapes for EDF intakes and exhausts.

My favourite is Cone Layout

https://www.conelayout.com/

ConeCalc works quite well and is free!

http://www.i-logic.com/conecalc.htm

Steve
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Hepcat
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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2017, 09:23:06 PM »

3view,
I thought the attachment below might amuse you.  Truthfully, as I was reading your post I stretched out my right hand and pulled out the end book on the bookshelf, 'Practical Geometry and Engineering Graphics' by Abbott.  Anyone taking up draughting sixty or so years ago would have had at least one of Abbotts text books.  I treasure this one because it was a discard from the RAF Cosford library. I have just copied the page with the simple straight and oblique cones.  Other pages have intersecting cones  and cones and cylinders ...   Draughting could be sheer hard work before computers. 
John 
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aardvark_bill
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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2017, 09:54:12 PM »

Hepcat,
I googled the text that you referenced as I like old books and it looked interesting.  I found a copy on Ebay for sale in Perth, Australia.  It had a couple of pictures and I could hardly believe it - it was of the same pages that you copied!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Practical-Geometry-and-Engineering-Graphics-W-Abbott-1967-/271235876519

Amazing coincidence.

Billy
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Andrew Darby
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« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2017, 04:39:10 PM »

Gosh, I did hours of those cone constructions in technical drawing at school, and yes thank goodness for computers  Cheesy

When I did the cone for the paper front end for the VMC I used Inventor and the "sheet metal" function which made a good job of getting the shape right...

Andrew
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« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2017, 06:47:03 AM »

Very interesting.

I guessed there must be a long-hand method of drawing these shapes.

The 'cone-layout' program was developed for making the intricate exhausts on 2 stroke racing motorbikes.

Steve
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wmazz
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« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2017, 04:22:21 AM »


I guessed there must be a long-hand method of drawing these shapes.

The 'cone-layout' program was developed for making the intricate exhausts on 2 stroke racing motorbikes.


I started building pipes when I was 18, and learned how to draft all the patterns before
I learned the easy way. But drawing cone patterns by hand is easy.

1). The easiest units to draw cones is millimeters.

2). Draw out the actual cone. Don't worry about scale, but 1:1 scale does make laying
out the pattern easier.

3). Big end - small end = difference.

4) Difference / Length = cotangent

5). Cotangent * big end = point (radius).

6). Use a ruler or 1/4" wide tape measure to draw the length of the cone, mark the
big end, and small end from the point.

If you made your cone to scale, draw 3 lines, the center and 2 sides. Depending on
your accuracy the length of the cone will be the same as #5.  

7). Use trammel points or a compass to draw the big end and small end arcs from
the point

8. Calculate the length of each arc (pi * big or small diameter) and measure the
arc with a flexible metric ruler. I still use a 1/4" measuring tape with inches and mm's.

9). Use a straight edge to line up each side of the arc using the 3 points (the big end,
small end arcs, and the point at the top of the cone). If all 3 points line up on each
side, your cone pattern is perfect.

If you are not worried about perfection. Measure the big end arc, and draw a line
using the 2 points (top of the cone to one side of the big end arc).


Bill M.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 04:37:11 AM by wmazz » Logged

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