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Author Topic: Suggestions for training software?  (Read 197 times)
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Pursuivant
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« on: October 05, 2016, 01:04:00 PM »

I'm very new to flying model aircraft (plenty of experience with static models and flight sims). My last flying model was an old plastic Cox control line plane that I flew into the ground as a kid. Anyhow, apparently there are software programs which can teach you to actually fly model aircraft before you risk your precious balsa and foam creation to the unforgiving forces of gravity.

The only drawback is that the options on the market are expensive and mostly seem to be aimed at RC.

Are there older/cheaper versions of the software?

How well do the training programs work to teach you to actually fly?

How well do the programs actually simulate flight models and environmental conditions? In particular it seems like accurate wind/thermal modeling would be crucial for RC gliders and very small/light models which get blown around by even the gentlest winds.

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Konrad
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2016, 01:27:13 PM »

I'm very new to flying model aircraft (plenty of experience with static models and flight sims). My last flying model was an old plastic Cox control line plane that I flew into the ground as a kid. Anyhow, apparently there are software programs which can teach you to actually fly model aircraft before you risk your precious balsa and foam creation to the unforgiving forces of gravity.

The only drawback is that the options on the market are expensive and mostly seem to be aimed at RC.

Are there older/cheaper versions of the software?

How well do the training programs work to teach you to actually fly?

How well do the programs actually simulate flight models and environmental conditions? In particular it seems like accurate wind/thermal modeling would be crucial for RC gliders and very small/light models which get blown around by even the gentlest winds.

All simulators are of great value if they save one aircraft. (The "reset" button is great!)
The Phoenix sim has one of the best physic engine I've ever run across.
http://www.phoenix-sim.com

The purpose of an RC sim is to train you to learn the control reversal and stall recovery. The more advanced ones such as the Phoenix can teach you muscle memory for more advanced aerobatics.

They aren't very good at trouble shooting control set up errors in the real world.

All are limited by the screen, as such I haven't tried them for reading the nuances of a glider that is 2 Km away.

What are your issues with CL? Add some down going up wind and step backwards as the line slacken. Oh and launch downwind. This is so that at the 1/4 circle mark any wind is pushing the model away from you as the model accelerates to flying speed.

All the best,
Konrad

 
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Bill G
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2016, 11:55:27 PM »

My experience with flight sims is that the models fly better (certainly more forgiving) than the average model.  IMO, their main benefit is teaching the coordination of aileron and elevator input, required for flying aileron models.  I had a very short period where I found them useful, in that transition.  New pilots tend to want to separate right/left and up/down stick movement, versus the combined stick movement required for aileron flight, which is generally aileron movement first, feed in elevator, and then gradually reduce the aileron input while you coordinate the turn, since now that you are banked, the elevator will act somewhat like a rudder or aileron and hold the turn. 
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perttime
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2016, 03:11:00 AM »

The only drawback is that the options on the market are expensive and mostly seem to be aimed at RC.
What would you like them to be aimed at?

Picasim is a free simulator for Windows, Android and iOS. For more features, you have to pay a little. It is mainly oriented towards slope soaring - but there are some powered RC planes and a couple of Control Line planes, too.

Sims are good for getting the orientation, so that you give the right control inputs regardless of which way the airplane is heading.
My difficulty is that I lack some spatial awareness. I lose track of which way I'm looking, and consequently where the airplane is in relation to the "world". In real world, I would feel the directions.
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Bill G
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« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2016, 07:43:30 PM »

A friend of mine who's very frugal downloaded a free sim some years ago, using his original DX6 (old version).  Can't remember which one, but it wasn't bad for free.  I spent some setup time getting it working for him, requiring calibration, direction reverse, etc, which was the only drawback versus buying some of the earlier plug and play, commercial simulators like the earlier Real Flight.
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