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Author Topic: Peck Peanut Pietenpol G-24 powered  (Read 1780 times)
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AeromodeLISTA
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« Reply #25 on: November 20, 2016, 06:59:06 PM »

I see no sins Jacques du Scalpele ... nice work  Smiley
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2016, 03:09:53 AM »

Looking very nice, Jon! I've never been much of a Pietenpol fan, but you're changing my mind.
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #27 on: November 21, 2016, 01:34:42 PM »

Very kind words, boys.

Video of the full-size Piet I'm (roughly) modelling, a Model A Ford powered version built by the guy flying it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MiLcMV7N8r0

Aim is to have it ready for next OFMAC indoor meeting at Berinsfield on Sunday.

 Smiley
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ZK-AUD
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« Reply #28 on: November 21, 2016, 02:09:16 PM »

Wow I loved the video and that beautiful Chauviere prop made me come over all goosey!

Might have to put this on the list - I actually have a nice 10" Chauviere I carved a while back but never put on the front of anything....
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2016, 10:02:53 AM »

All done - except for registration letters on tail, and I'm pretending the markings on the stbd fuselage side don't exist!
All Esaki surfaces given one coat of non-shrinking dope thinned 50%
Final weight 15.2g (9.4 airframe, 5.8 motor) plus 0.7g tail-weight to balance = total 15.9g, so a loading of 0.53 g/sq in.

This is about 15% more than expected, on top of what I always reckoned would be a heavy plane for its limited wing area.
The kit wood tended to be stiff and so a bit heavy, and I could have taken more care with the rad and bulkhead weight etc.

But I'm chuffed enough as this is my first complete Peanut, and first working CO2 model.  Cheesy

Test glides in the garden showed the need for a bit of breathed-on up-elevator, and a marginal increase in tail-weight.
Test flights under power in the village recreation ground were tricky as it was damp and a bit gusty and the grass was wet.
G-24 set to run for up to 25-30secs on a 5sec gas-only charge, which seems to give about 15-20 secs of reasonable thrust before tailing off.

I tried all sorts of settings, see three short videos here https://goo.gl/photos/c9nG1rBX8TjQggSFA
But ultimately the initial power burst has a lot of left-torque, so (despite the right-thrust built in) I needed to breath-on some wash-in on the left wing, with a smidge of left-rudder for left circuits.

Will see what tomorrow brings indoors...

Smiley Jon

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Re: Peck Peanut Pietenpol G-24 powered
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Re: Peck Peanut Pietenpol G-24 powered
« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 10:14:12 AM by Jack Plane » Logged
Pete Fardell
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« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2016, 01:21:37 PM »

It's lovely, Jon. Great job!

(Needs a pilot though  Cheesy)
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DHnut
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« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2016, 02:24:06 PM »

Jon,
       The model looks very nice and I think the weight is about right. The weight penalty of the longerons is very little for the increased security of having sufficient strength. I watch the videos and the impression is that the power might benefit in being reduced, and a tab to hold the left wing up would be a possibility. Also using a prop with less pitch is another option. I have found that it is easy to get to much throttle on in the initial trimming giving a short run and a much stronger power burst. Hope that helps.
Ricky
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #32 on: November 26, 2016, 05:17:29 PM »

It's lovely, Jon. Great job!

(Needs a pilot though  Cheesy)

Cheers Pete... and thanks for volunteering!!  Grin

Jon,
       ... the impression is that the power might benefit in being reduced, and a tab to hold the left wing up would be a possibility. Also using a prop with less pitch is another option. I have found that it is easy to get too much throttle on in the initial trimming giving a short run and a much stronger power burst. Hope that helps.
Ricky

Thanks Ricky, certainly makes sense from my experience this morning.  Will tickle back the throttle in tomorrow's indoor session.  The prop is that supplied with the motor, not sure what pitch.

A bit surprised at the lack of climb and steep glide, but the incidence is correct according to the plan, so maybe its just a draggy design and all.

Will see what happens in a dry and windless interior!
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AeromodeLISTA
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Russ Lister



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« Reply #33 on: November 26, 2016, 06:01:20 PM »

The finished product looks even better Jon  Smiley

If it's of any help .... my peanut Piet has flown for over thirty seconds indoors,  but has always been too easily unsettled outdoors even on pretty calm days. I think indoors things will be different!
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DHnut
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« Reply #34 on: November 26, 2016, 08:39:02 PM »

Jon,
       I overlooked to mention that I have used the Williams brothers props with good results. They are flexible white nylon and seem to have less pitch and the small one is about 4.5" diameter. Where is the CG because it sounds as if it might be a little forward if there is a steep glide. I know it hurts to add tail weight.
Ricky
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #35 on: November 27, 2016, 05:38:05 AM »

Thanks Russ - of course I reduced the dihedral to 10mm from the plan's 15mm; always saw this as an indoor jobbie really.

Ricky - 0.6g of blue-tak on the tails-skid has already brought the CG to the correct point on the plan.  Will try a bit more indoors today, until the guide (or low-powered glide) is flatter, then replace with lead shot inside the rudder-post.

Pete - 'The English Patient' is now underway!  Cheesy  Roughly scalpeled squidgy foam wrapped in strands of cotton-wool and fixed with watery PVA which dried overnight.  The hardened shell seems soft enough to pinch to final shape with nose etc, then paint.  Expect about 0.5g final weight.

The bugger is that I did my back in at the damp rec ground yesterday; the usual lower spine place... aargh!  I was going to bring the Kid to Berinsfield as my ground-crew (literally!) but he's off to a cookery-school themed birthday party of all things!  So I can see a bit of of paracetamol-abuse to last me the day, an hour's drive each way.

Jon
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #36 on: November 27, 2016, 08:03:36 AM »

Interesting technique! I'll reserve judgement till he's finished though!  Grin
I suppose you can put him in the rear cockpit and reduce the tail weight slightly (assuming Pietenpols are flown from both seats?)
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #37 on: November 27, 2016, 01:04:50 PM »

Back-seat pilot position, the Pietenpol.  The forward seat doesn't need a windscreen, the upright radiator serves well enough as such, as well a massive 'air-brake' in the model!  I imagine its not an easy aircraft for the front-seat passenger to get into; the pilot at least has the benefit of being able to hinge-up a section of the trailing-edge aft of the fuel-tank in the centre-section (see previous photo)!

Not a brilliant session today:  the Berinsfield hall is really just too small a space for a Peanut which needs to fly a bit fast to achieve lift.  Trimming was proceeding fine, but the damage caused to the structure when its kinetic energy got repeatedly stopped by the forest of table and chair legs around the perimeter became increasingly unacceptable.  Repairs to be properly carried out in the comfort of my modelling corner!  Shocked

The Petersfield Posse have it easy!
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #38 on: November 27, 2016, 01:23:09 PM »

That photo shows just what tiddly little aircraft they are.

Sorry to hear about the damage. Don't you just hate chair and table legs?
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Andrew Darby
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« Reply #39 on: November 27, 2016, 01:59:54 PM »

Super job Jon

Sympathy with the leg damage, I managed to suffer the same with my Camel at Bushfields yesterday.... Cry

Andrew
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« Reply #40 on: November 27, 2016, 03:21:59 PM »

Super job Jon

Sympathy with the leg damage, I managed to suffer the same with my Camel at Bushfields yesterday.... Cry

Andrew

Commiserations Andrew, even though the full-size Camel excelled as a ground-attack machine!  Grin

Always good to have a group-hug, boys.

One thing I've noticed at Bushfield is that folk tend to fly lighter Peanuts, floaty Walnuts, anorexic Profiles and ethereal Microfilms in such limited confines.  Would be good if we could limit the forest to one half of the space...
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #41 on: November 27, 2016, 03:46:53 PM »

I've put thin carbon rod in the leading edges of two my more recent scale models, largely to protect against the dreaded 'table leg crunch'. I think I might make this my standard practice, although from a weight point of view it's probably not really a sensible option on smaller models like peanuts.
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AeromodeLISTA
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« Reply #42 on: November 27, 2016, 05:10:08 PM »

Sorry to hear about the damage Jon .... how were things looking up to that point?

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Jack Plane
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« Reply #43 on: November 28, 2016, 02:38:17 AM »

Pete - I like the carbon method!  Interestingly the wings on the Piet were absolutely fine, leading edges being made from Peck's most robust strip-wood, and all eight strut fixing points used reinforcing half-moons which held well.

The damage was - progressively - at all the fuselage strut locations:  first the aft cabane strut fixings came loose at their bases (head-on shock), then each of the wing-strut points (twisting shock as each wing in turn took the brunt of leg contact), finally one lower longeron snapped upwards at the rear undercarriage strut location (hard landing after a stall) tearing up adjacent tissue areas.

All down to too much kinetic energy in too hard and small a space for trimming, combined with lack of built-in 'give' to absorb shocks.

Russ - Difficult to tell how well trimming progressed, as the loss of rigid incidence happened early on (aft cabane struts), until only the forward cabane struts were holding the wing on at all!

Some calm days forecast this week, but near freezing so don't know how well the little 'steam-engine' will work outdoors!
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #44 on: November 28, 2016, 08:00:56 AM »

Good luck with the outdoor trimming. I'll be interested to hear if the motor can cope at all with the cold.

 Strut point and undercarriage breakages are a real pain indoors- rarely serious, but they gradually destroy the trim and tattify the model. At least they do for me. The only person I know who can disintegrate a model, at power, full on into a wall and have it good as new, back together and flying well five minutes later is of course Derek Knight. No one knows how he does it though (beyond the fact that there's some kind of dark West Country witchcraft involved, obviously).
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