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Author Topic: Penthouse Lady  (Read 1972 times)
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OZPAF
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« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2017, 05:14:43 PM »

Its good to see you have given the lady some curves John Smiley That sounds very light - it should fly well.

John
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Hepcat
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« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2017, 07:07:11 PM »

At last, after about four months I am more or less finished and at Clayton on March 4 I hope to get her flying and then I can declare the build (and my building block) finished. (pic 1)  The final job covering.  I used ‘Esaki’ on the fuselage with the grain vertical to avoid ‘starved horses’ but I don’t think I need have bothered. I think the longerons would stand a full water shrink but a light steaming seemed to have the tissue taut enough.  The wing and tailplane were an annoying hitch.  The intention was to cover with ‘Mylar’ but the canister of ‘Spray Mount’ would not yield the smallest drop of its precious contents.  I covered them with condenser paper fixed with diluted PVA which is not what I wanted.(pic 2)  That is why I said I was more or less finished because I now need to build a new wing and tail and cover them with film. (I have bought another ‘Spray Mount!)
Most of the build is bog standard but the mounting of the tailplane and fin may not be common.  There is a bamboo post about 0.05 diameter glued on the end of the fuselage.  There is a paper tube on the trailing edge of the fin which slides on the top of the bamboo. A short piece of 0.009 piano wire is bent double and glued to the leading edge of the fin with the bent end pointing down (just for safety). The bend end is pushed into a piece of soft 1/32 balsa in the top of the fuselage. Fin offset can be varied for turn trim. (pic 3). This underneath view shews the tailplane leading edge held under a ledge and a hole at the trailing edge goes over the bottom of the bamboo. A very small band goes from top to bottom of the bamboo (pic Cool. Tail incidence can be changed with packing between the top of the tail and the bottom of the fuselage.
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Hepcat
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« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2017, 07:12:04 PM »

That finishes on the model itself but something came up last time I was flying. I was changing motors, not an easy job in a small fuselage and with arthritic fingers. I was shaking and turning and poking until my flying friend Tim said ‘give it here, I have a loading stick’ and in a short time the motor was in.  I shall be ever grateful to Tim for it emphasized the importance of being able to change motors quickly when in a competition.  I did not have time to look at Tim’s stick but I was determined to have one and here is what I did laying against the paper blast tube. (pic 1). The stick is 1/8 x ¼ hard balsa. Most of the other pieces are cut from a 1/16 x 3/16 coffee stirrer. The motor goes over the two fork ends at the rear and is kept in tension by wrapping round the vertical posts at the front. The horizontal bar rest against the front of the fuselage which aligns the rear fork with the motor peg.  I have mounted a balsa piece on the horizontal piece the touches the side of the nose sheeting and holds the stuffer upright so that the motor peg can be just pushed straight down. (pic 2 is the loader in place)

One quick point I found interesting. I mentioned I used the first propeller on my old ‘Bar Fly’ where the nose former was ½” x 5/8”. I and others thought this too small and so the ‘Lady’ went up to 5/8 x 5/8.  There is a picture of the two (pic3) and what interested me was that an 1/8” on the side of a nose block increased the weight by 0.3g. A never ending battle.  The covered weights I have are: fuselage 1.78g, wing 0.86g, tailplane 0.36g, fin 0.13g, propeller assembly 0.80g.  Total 3.93g.
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faif2d
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« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2017, 10:23:43 PM »

very nicely done.  I like the way you explain, in words I can understand, Why you do some of the things that you do.  Kind of lets us inside your head a little.
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OZPAF
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« Reply #29 on: February 20, 2017, 01:26:41 AM »

I agree with F2D John. Your explanations are easy to follow and there is always some innovative n simple idea to be filed away.

A pity re the wing and stab - however I guess they will be much lighter in film and just as important less prone to warp.

Good luck with the trimming.

John
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Rossclements
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« Reply #30 on: February 20, 2017, 08:45:08 AM »

Looks Great! For your next model you might try something like this: https://indoornewsandviews.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/inav-124s.pdf It starts on page 38 I have seen it in action and it works pretty well!

Ross
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trmilner
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« Reply #31 on: February 20, 2017, 03:53:49 PM »

Don't forget the winding stooge, John.
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Hepcat
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« Reply #32 on: February 20, 2017, 08:02:13 PM »

Let me start by apologizing for my mistake in #27. I talked about one of the three pieces of wood glued across the main rod as being vertical. As I wrote this I was imagining holding at as I used it. As can be seen in the pictures all three are parallel with the two short ones on one side of the rod and the long one on the other side.

Russ,
Thank you for for the suggestion of winding outsidethe fuselage.  That would be the way to do things and I will take a serious look but I can see problems with the internal space required.  It is interesting that this suggestion comes up immediately after my last photograph where I mentioned the increase in weight by a small increase in the size of the nose block. The increase was only 0.3g but that is 7.6% of the total weight.  The model in the article was a 'Lacy' which is notable for its boxy fuselage. The opening in the nose of my model is only a half inch square. The motor peg would not even go through that.  However winding outside the fuselage is now commonplace in outdoor rubber so a little further thought should enable me to adapt your suggestion.
Tim,
Thanks for the reminder on the stooge. A thing I have remembered myself is a box to carry her in.  I have a cardboard box which I can cut up to make something.  I have seen mention of boxes from foam sheet.  Does anyone have advice on that. Where to buy foam? What thickness, 1/4 inch? 'UHU' Por to stick it?
John
      
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faif2d
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« Reply #33 on: February 21, 2017, 11:06:09 AM »

I once back about 1968 or so drove to Bong air force base for a contest.  That was about a 200 mile round trip and when I got there I found that I had left the prop assys at home.  When I got home I purchased some plywood and made 4 coffins for all of the classes that I flew at the time.  Everything stayed in the boxes, as a matter of fact they are up in the attic as we type.
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Olbill
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« Reply #34 on: February 21, 2017, 11:07:32 AM »

I've made boxes from foam poster board which is foam (about 1/8" thick) with heavy paper glued to both sides. Hot melt glue works well for attachment or you can use cloth or metal duct tape either alone or with glue.
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OZPAF
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« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2017, 04:50:16 PM »

I have used 20mm thick EPS - Styrofoam boxes for indoor FF models. I have one that dates back to the 80's. They are glued and pinned (with toothpicks).

Recent boxes I've made have been glued with "Weldbond", a water based glue and the edges protected with fabric reinforced tape.

The EPs sheets however are best cut with a hot wire cutter.
Depron or poster boar would be easier and neater with a knife.

John
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