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Author Topic: Canard design  (Read 1179 times)
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sprogs
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« on: February 03, 2017, 12:54:01 PM »

Hi Everyone
I have always loved canard, or tail first aircraft, but I have found it hard to get simple understandable guidance for their set up and design.
Can any of you point me in the right direction ?
Some time ago I found a set of "Whitewings" card planes that included some very pretty canards, I would like to convert them to full fuselage aircraft.
XX
Liz
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piecost
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2017, 04:47:10 PM »

Liz, i suggest scaling up your favourite small model into proprogressively larger card, depron or balsa chuck gliders checking how they fly at each stage. The canard may need to be larger than looks aesthetically correct. Ithe final model may
need a thick/cambered section. Use the chuch glider to figure out the balance point and the setting angle for the canard. Good luck & please post pictures.
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p40qmilj
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2017, 04:59:25 PM »

 Grin  liz
 take the plan for CH Grant's CLOULD TRAMP and then do the following
1) convert the motor sick to a box 1 inch square  this will run the entire length
2) take the wing plan as is (or build as a stick and tissue job.  for a canard it has 3/4 inch dihedral per panel.
3) build the elevators as is and do the following 1 1/4 inch dihedral per panel. + 3/32 incidence angle on LE.
to assemble
1) elevator go 1 bayback of nose
2) wings are at rear
3) rudder is in normal position
4) motor is pegged at nose and runs length of box.
5) A 7 INCH PROP IN PUSHER CONFIGURATION IS WHAT YOU WANT

This design works as a tractor, pusher in the regular configuration, a canard with forward straight or swept back wings.

lastly  GO NUTS,

JIM Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin
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Re: Canard design
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TimWescott
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2017, 07:16:01 PM »

I'm all for starting any "oddball" design effort by making chuck gliders.

There's some information out there.  Mostly, the CG needs to be well ahead of the wing, and you need to scale the vertical fin up because it's not as far behind the CG as a conventional-tailed airplane has.  I've been -- mostly -- able to calculate a decent starting CG using this page.  Note that the pencil & paper "starting" CG is just that -- it'll be subject to considerable adjustment when you get the thing in the air.  In particular, that page is for full-scale aircraft, which translates pretty well into RC designs, only somewhat well for sport FF designs, and which tends to put the CG entirely too far back for CL.
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HoveToo
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2017, 05:05:49 AM »

I know that Pit produced a Viggen clg and has some expertise on how to make them fly - click home and type viggen into the search box.  Good luck - swept wing catajets look good while they fly but the ending can be dramatic...
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Pit
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2017, 10:32:44 AM »

The Bill Brown RUTANGO (plans Gallery) is a good basis which can easily be modded to a single motor pusher or tractor.  I did a lot of testing with a stick fuselage and depron flying surfaces to get things right.  The finished model then practically "flew off the board".

Be sure to read the comments about the changes needed (incidence, canard dihedral).
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frash
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2017, 09:55:16 PM »

A good and simpler canard design from Sweden can be found at http://indooraero.homeunix.net/gammon.shtml.

Fred Rash
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Olbill
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2017, 10:16:54 PM »

This looks like a good place to start:

http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?topic=14519.575
reply 584
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frash
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« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2017, 10:20:33 PM »


For all foam Silverlit differential thrust RC, the Dizzy Space canard design with twin booms works well. Link below shows photos but no plans.

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?1385593-Oder-Torsten-s-Dizzy-Space

Fred Rash
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Terry Fitzpatrick
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« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2017, 05:39:58 PM »

Liz, there is a book called "Design for Aeromodellers" published in 1955 by Model Aeronautical Press in the UK. The book has some simple calculations and explanations on model aircraft design and has a chapter on canards. You can download your your free copy from rclibrary.co.uk

regards Terry F.
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sprogs
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« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2017, 03:09:34 PM »

Hi Everyone
Thank you all for your replies.
I have a kit called "Blue Impulse", I built one before and it flew like a seagull on it's way home from the chipshop.
I think it would make a much better canard than standard layout so I'm going to give it a try.
Watch this space !
(But please don't comment on my appalling covering)
XX
Liz
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davidjohnnorman
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« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2017, 11:05:19 AM »

the canard is actually more efficient than the tractor aircraft, as the front wing contributes lift, which is why many human powered aircraft are canards. It has never become a popular choice because an engine up front is easier to cool.
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aramid
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« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2017, 09:07:33 PM »

Hi Liz
take a look at this:  Tail First Tips (Article and Drawing) (dab58)
Air Trails Magazine
   Sure it is like 1937 or so but it does give some real information on the how and why of the final proportions
cheers
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