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Author Topic: New to RC  (Read 894 times)
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Henry0010
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« on: February 27, 2017, 09:05:21 PM »

I am interested in building a 12-16 inch wingspan RC model, but I'm unsure what equipment (motor, esc, servos, battery, etc) to equip it. I know that this has to have been covered, but... I know that there are a million (dozen) possibilities, but I am not sure what to look for. Any suggestions or a pointer to where to start? Thanks. I'm just a bit overwhelmed. When I was in high school (ooooh, so long ago...) I built the Tern Aero Ryan ST - sooo sweet and would like to adapt it to RC (or a generic plane that I drew up for another purpose).
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Konrad
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2017, 09:15:49 PM »

The 16 inch is a bit on the small side for an entry level Gummy Band to RC conversion. These conversions are for the most part advance models. I do not recommend them as entry level RC models!

Have you looked at this thread ?
http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?topic=12443.0

If you insist is do these look at the 30" plus kits as a start.

There are a lot of fine foam ARFs that make fine RC trainer in these under a meter model spans.
http://www.horizonhobby.com/umx-cessna-182-bnf-basic-eflu5650?clickpath=homepage__espot3_02032017
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Cut it twice and it's still too short!
Barrie
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2017, 03:21:11 AM »

I agree 30" to40", So a free flight balsa /tissue would fit the bill
Go and look in the plans section, something like a mercury magna , flies a dream
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Konrad
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2017, 12:50:28 PM »

Sorry that should have read: If you insist on doing these, look at the 30" plus kits as a start.

These make good first time conversions, but generally are not good beginner models for entry into R/C flight.
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Cut it twice and it's still too short!
Henry0010
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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2017, 10:14:37 PM »

Thank you for the input. I will check it out. I appreciate the advice on size and will take it into account.
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DavidJP
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2017, 03:31:50 AM »

As a matter of interest are you going for full house?  With the smaller models sometimes rudder and elevator - and throttle is sufficient. 
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lincoln
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2018, 05:03:50 AM »

I realize this thread is aging, but I'm guessing others will look at it.

You can do the Ryan ST after you've become an expert pilot and have flown a couple of models.

In general, people are correct that a bigger model is better for starters, unless it's very light. If you have a place indoors to fly, or if you can go out and fly when it's VERY calm, you could start with a Night Vapor. These bounce more easily than heavier models and are very slow. Capable of flying INSIDE the hobby shop unless there are too many obstacles. Another very light model, though not as light as the Night Vapor, is the Moosquito, by Ron Fikes. This is a scratch build. If it floats your boat, I can send you a copy of the plans. I don't fly mine much because it's boring. For me, the only way for it to be fun is to go around obstacles like swing sets, trees, or the barbecue. That probably means it's a good trainer. I think mine is about 4 ounces, which isn't bad for a 26 inch wingspan, low aspect ratio model. Fikes' was, I think, 5 ounces (142 grams).  Again, it must be very calm to fly something like this. 
For somewhat more wind capability, I think you can still find the old GWS Pico J3 stick or the just plain Pico stick. Given a bit more dihedral, they're not hard to fly, and the price is right. If you cover the bottom with saran wrap to make it flat, they can handle considerably more wind than the models I've mentioned above. That still means relatively calm days, but a light breeze is ok.  If you want something less ugly, I recall that the GWS Tiger Moth flies well. These models, with the original equipment, ought to fly fine with a 2S lipo. I seem to recall I used to use obsolete, 2S cell phone packs, which I think were 800 mAh. Those were good for 20 or 30 minutes. If you use the stock motor, you'll need a brushed speed control that can handle several amps, though you might get away with as little as 2.

The Radian UMX flies remarkably well and, with power, can handle a bit of wind. There's some kind of autopilot gadget that can deal with air that's a little rough, though that's a relative thing.

When you wear out one of the above airplanes, you could switch the equipment to something balsa that you built. I recall there's at least one kit out there to put old Pico stuff in. I think Mountain Models had some stuff like this, but I seem to recall they were closing soon, or have closed.

Anyway, the above are some models I know which I think might be suitable. But there may be something better.
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