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Author Topic: 1/10 Fokker DVII  (Read 12037 times)
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #175 on: January 08, 2019, 07:57:43 PM »

They don’t look pinked to me either.
http://www.primeportal.net/hangar/bill_spidle2/fokker_dvii/
Some of them are slightly wobbly though on the close up shot. (Just let me know if you need any tips on how to apply wonky details!)
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Nigel Monk
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« Reply #176 on: January 11, 2019, 06:35:31 AM »








You might be able to modify a rotary cutter wheel to give a jagged edge by nicking it either side although the steel in those wheels is very hard and the scale tiny (about .0125" pitch?). My mother (87 on Tuesday), a qualified seamstress, tells me they are in fact better at producing accurate cuts that scissors. Appreciate you were being slightly ironic.
great build thread
Nigel

I have used pinking shears before on fabric and they do cut much better than scissors would.


Yes, sorry, to be clear, I was suggesting a rotary cutter might be modified to replicate a pinking effect

these cut with an anvil action, not a dragging action as with a blade against a straight edge, but the idea of tearing against an edge might be simpler if using tissue.

Wikipedia has this about what we know of as pinking shears "The pinking shears design was made by Samuel Briskman in 1931",  so no use in WW I, although it's quite possible the idea was borrowed from an earlier idea. For a long while, pinking was a cheaper alternative to over-lock stitching cloth edges to control fraying. From a production engineering perspective for wing rib tapes, it would make sense to have woven cloth strips, like (modern) bandages, but under the exigencies of war and field repairs, I can imagine anything and everything would be used.
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Tiger Tim
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« Reply #177 on: January 13, 2019, 11:29:20 PM »

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WWI rib tapes. Did the Germans even use pinked edges on their fabric rib tapes? Did anyone?

I don't think so. But then again one really never knows.
Luckily we do know how the D.VIIs we’re done as there’s one in a small museum in Canada that’s incredibly still wearing its WWI covering and paint (save for a coup,e patches applied over the years).  I personally don’t know how the tapes were treated but they would.

http://www.bromemuseum.com/about/

http://www.williammaloney.com/Aviation/BromeCountyMuseum/FokkerDVII.jpg
1/10 Fokker DVII
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vtdiy
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« Reply #178 on: January 14, 2019, 10:26:02 AM »

That's a remarkable photo and plane!
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Monz
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« Reply #179 on: January 14, 2019, 05:17:10 PM »

Quote
WWI rib tapes. Did the Germans even use pinked edges on their fabric rib tapes? Did anyone?

I don't think so. But then again one really never knows.
Luckily we do know how the D.VIIs we’re done as there’s one in a small museum in Canada that’s incredibly still wearing its WWI covering and paint (save for a coup,e patches applied over the years).  I personally don’t know how the tapes were treated but they would.

http://www.bromemuseum.com/about/

http://www.williammaloney.com/Aviation/BromeCountyMuseum/FokkerDVII.jpg





Amazing that, thanks. To think, that aeroplane is a hundred years old... And original. Unreal.

I've had some great info from here and elsewhere on the rib tapes. Straight cut ones are already on the bottom wings  Wink

Still lozenging away over here, had a bit of an issue with the top wing where I had a few days break between lozenge sessions and the next batch was not as good as the first. I had stretched the tissue during application of the decals and it was too much for it to shrink back taught. So peeled off what I could and dissolved the rest with thinners. I got away with not having to recover that section of wing with tissue again which was a bonus. The thinners stripped everything out of the tissue and I was able to lick shrink it back to how it was and reseal it.

Not much to show, lozenge is a lozenge is a lozenge  Grin Next few days will be lots and lots of 2.5mm white stripes. A seven nation army couldn't hold me back  Roll Eyes


1/10 Fokker DVII
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Rhys
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« Reply #180 on: January 18, 2019, 10:41:31 PM »

With regard to rib tapes, I found the following information on the forum of theaerodrome.com.  A forum member of the name Dan San, to give him credit wrote the following. Interesting notes ...


"Blue tapes were on the wings and tails of aircraft built by the Ost Deutsche Albatros werke (OAW). Albatros built Fok. D.VII aircraft had salmon pink tapes. Fokker, Halberstadt, Rumpler, LFG Roland, LVG used cut strips of the lozenge fabric........Fokker used strips of the lozenge fabric for the rib tapes. After the ribs on the wings and stabilizer were taped the leading and trailing and wing tips and stabilizer seams were taped over. The aileron, elevator, fin and rudder ribs were not taped. The seams surrounding the ailerons, elevators, fin and rudder taped. The seams on the fuselage were NOT taped.

OAW used blue tapes and sometimes used strips of lozenge cloth.

Albatros used salmon pink tapes and sometimes used strips of lozenge cloth
Blue skies ahead,
Dan-San"
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flydean1
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« Reply #181 on: January 18, 2019, 10:57:48 PM »

I believe that was Dan-San Abbot, a well-known authority on WWI aircraft.  I used to subscribe to WWI Aero and Skyways magazines.  His work appeared regularly.  If anyone would know, it would have been him.

The example in the museum appears to not have the one and only bracing wire from the upper forward interplane strut to the lower forward cabane/fuselage attachment.  Maybe some DVII's didn't have them.
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fred
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« Reply #182 on: January 19, 2019, 01:26:41 PM »

Or ? it could have erm.. fallen off, in the century since it's manufacture
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Rhys
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« Reply #183 on: January 19, 2019, 02:29:17 PM »

Looking through a 1/6 scale build of an Albatros C1 I was intrigued at the treatise of rib tape preparation. The modeller has done quite a bit of research and notes that both German and British manufacturers frayed the taping on both longitudinal sides. This apparently would allow the edges to be doped/attached more streamlined and flush with the wing fabric to reduce potential tearing.
 
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skyraider
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« Reply #184 on: January 19, 2019, 05:49:46 PM »

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The example in the museum appears to not have the one and only bracing wire from the upper forward interplane strut to the lower forward cabane/fuselage attachment.  Maybe some DVII's didn't have them.

To the best of my knowledge, the D-7 never had bracing wires from interplane struts to the cabanes or fuselage.
I have books with hundreds of photographs on the D7 and I've never seen this. The only wires I've seen were the
aileron cables just aft of the rear top cabane entering the fuselage side just forward on the cockpit.

Skyraider
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flydean1
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« Reply #185 on: January 19, 2019, 06:32:17 PM »

That's probably the one I'm thinking about.  It didn't look like the typical bracing wire so it's a control cable.  OK, I learned something.  It's still missing on the museum example.  Probably some variants have the cable re-routed.
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skyraider
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« Reply #186 on: January 19, 2019, 10:24:38 PM »

Flydean1,
    The cable is there. Its just hard to see. Look closer if you can.

Skyraider
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flydean1
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« Reply #187 on: January 19, 2019, 10:36:25 PM »

Got it, thanks.
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