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Author Topic: Hurricane Ophelia--Welcome to our world  (Read 515 times)
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flydean1
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« on: October 12, 2017, 07:16:06 AM »

In gratitude for the many several HPBF members that expressed sympathy for us Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, & Texas members during the recent onslaught of hurricanes, we are sending a sample of our tropical systems for your enjoyment.

Hurricane Ophelia is due off the coast of Ireland with 80 mph winds in a few days.

Hopefully the cold North Atlantic waters will snuff out the fire before anyone suffers its' ill effects.
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2017, 08:26:28 AM »

This wee lassie?  From here it looks forecast to pass north of Ireland, peaking well offshore at about 50kts, but might give the Outer Hebrides a reasonable clean.

Huge sympathies to everyone everywhere whose habitats are becoming increasingly messed up by the weather.
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Prosper
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 08:56:57 AM »

Here it is. Thanks for the sympathy Flydean, but this will be an "Ex-Ophelia" as forecast now. Still quite frisky though. We did have a genuine hooricane in 1987, that was famously dismissed in advance by a leading weatherman whose life was changed ever after. Poor fella. I won't mention his name but it was Michael Fish. I slept that night (eventually) with a chair planted over my head. I was on the top floor of a rickety old house near the highest point in town. It was windy.

Stephen.
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RalphS
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2017, 11:35:42 AM »

The weather effects seem responsible lately for lots of problems in the U.S. be it typhoons, floods and now wildfires in CA.  I have just returned from our C d'H contest in Tatton park (it was windy but okay) and on the journey I was listening, on radio, to part three of Shakespeare's Hamlet.  Ophelia has been found in the water beyond all help.  I have no idea what this new Ophelia is doing off the coast of Ireland.  As for Prosper's little storm, I was in London that night after setting up an exhibition in Alexandra Park London.  It seemed a bit windy but back at the hotel I slept soundly all night.  In the morning trees were lying across cars and when I got to the exhibition the large, temporary, tent like structures had been ripped apart and there were leaflets and advertising material distributed as far as the eye could see.  The most efficient leaflet distribution system ever. 

All child's play compared with U.S weather.  People seem to have lost everything.  Just hope they can rebuild their houses and their lives. 
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PB_guy
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2017, 11:53:37 AM »

If you live in Alaska, or the Yukon, you expect to have the odd bit of frozen precipitation, and in the winter you might even find your friends become difficult to recognize when you meet them outdoors because of all the paraphernalia they are wearing. And if you live in Arizona, you might find it a little more than pleasantly warm in the middle of the summer. It is even possible that your friends are hunkered down inside with the air-conditioning going at full bore. And if you are in India, you might find it slightly damp in monsoon season.
  Weather patterns don't change just because we want them to change. Old-timers learn how to cope with extremes of conditions in the areas in which they end up living. Mostly, we don't choose to live someplace - we just seem to end up somewhere due to circumstances beyond our control. We cannot change the weather. We can only try to survive it. We cannot empty entire regions because the are subject to the occasional extreme weather event. We sympathize with those whose lives are affected by these events, and we help when we can. But we can only intervene after the fact. For those who are still recovering from the earthquakes in New Zealand, and the tsunami in Papua New Guinea, and the nuclear power plant disaster in Japan, and the tornadoes in the American prairies and the hurricanes in the American south, we send our prayers.
ian
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flydean1
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« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2017, 05:59:35 PM »

Favorite hurricane story.

The late Frank Mock, a dear modeling friend who grew up in Tampa and was commissioned in the Air Force found himself stationed in Greece.  The CO asked him, at very, very short notice, to teach a class to US and Greek officers.  Having lots of experience (we both were kids when Donna blew through) he proceeded to tell how to prepare for a hurricane.  Well, the CO interrupted him stating that it was stupid to waste time on that subject.

The CO and other officers collected the Greeks and went to a watering hole in a nearby city.  When they arrived back at the Air Base, there was total destruction.  The gate guard said that a hurricane had just struck the place!

He never did apologize to Frank.
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DavidJP
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« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2017, 12:51:32 PM »

I think on balance we in England are fairly fortunate in that we do not have the extremes of weather experienced by some other countries.  Consequently we can get quite excited when we do have something a little unusual. 

Poor Michael Fish. But the chap I feel for most was he who during some snow explained the disruption on the railways was because it was the wrong kind of snow! Hmmmmm. 

And then we have the perennial lament about wet leaves on the tracks.  Oddly I well remember in the the days of steam locos with four six or eight driving wheels did not seem to have such problems with leaves or snow that are now experienced in the case of the electric trains which have a motor bogie every other carriage - providing perhaps 16 driving wheels distributed along the length of the train. Cynical maybe but as one who endured many cancellations and delays for what appeared to be inadequate reasons I feel I am justified.  Then some of the populace compare our ability to cope with that of say Canada.  We do not regularly have extremes like they for example so it is pointless spending a lot of money on plant and equipment which we may use once in ten years or less!

But my goodness is not the weather a force to be reckoned with.  Going to work after our hurricane I recall seeing an electricity pylon buckled as though someone had just trodden on it and pressed it to the ground. And then in an area where the residents had a bob or two seeing a house probably then valued at two or three million pounds with a Rolls and a Porsche in the driveway under a huge tree - all three, house and cars obviously "written off".  And undoubtedly some of the articles in the house were of great value. And it was a similar story for many properties in that road. I would think the insurance companies were wincing bit when they saw what was happening.

But the most heartening thing for me - as we had seen recently - is the fortitude shown by the majority of the of the victims - there they are - within hours working away clearing up and  making good. That is the stuff  - those that can do and those that can't moan about the "government" or some other luckless authority! 
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Andrew Darby
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« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2017, 03:49:46 PM »

We Brits love to talk about the weather, but as Davis said rarely is it all that bad.

It's never right for us, too hot, too cold, too windy or too still, lord knows how we ended up with an empire that covered a 3rd of the globe!

Andrew
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Hogwash I tell thee!
Jack Plane
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« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2017, 06:15:55 PM »

1/4 of the globe. It started because of the Spanish.  They were gaining so much wealth in the form of gold and silver from Central and South America. So - to ensure our own national security - we had to start pirating it off them!

Oh yes, we talk so much about the weather because it is a classless subject. Grin
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flydean1
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« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2017, 08:51:55 PM »

Latest forecast track takes it across Northern Ireland, and Scotland.  Take shelter my friends.
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p40qmilj
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« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2017, 12:21:18 AM »

 Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin a golden oldie or 2 to listen to as the b(female dog)h passes over

After the Hurricane  1960's
like a hurricane by neil young
i sure the are others along this vein

jim Grin
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2017, 01:46:42 AM »

I wouldn't want to be in the Western Approaches on Monday morning...
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DavidJP
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« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2017, 09:01:49 AM »

Strangely (well some of you may not think so my case) I find the wind fascinating and it's power quite inspiring.  In my youth I was ambling about in the Brecon Beacons fully loaded and it was apparently gusting at 50 - 60 knots.  I could actually lean against it and walking into it quite an effort.  I found it very satisfying to use every profanity in my vocabulary to abuse the wind and even resorted to "punching" it which when think about it for a just moment is as daft as you can be.  But it helped.  But the once over the peak and down a few metres it seemed almost flat calm.  Bit like on a run when sailing. Then suddenly you emerge and it blows you over......********. *********!! The thing to do was observe the sheep - they instinctively knew where to go according to the weather.

I am hoping to try and trim a model or two tomorrow.  Huh. 
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2017, 02:37:12 PM »

David, your Brecon story reminds when when I left London on a heavy old touring motorbike heading west - eventually to Ireland.

It was blowing hard as I crossed the River Severn suspension bridge:  between each pillar I had to tilt hard to the left, then, as each pillar came up, I had to rotate upright... then tilt again!  It was so much fun I nearly went back and did it again!
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