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Author Topic: Pistachio scale Vought F4U Corsair  (Read 446 times)
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Rudder flutter
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« on: December 07, 2017, 10:34:36 AM »

I started this model a few years ago, but some some reason it got sidetracked and has been sitting in a box. Its about time I finished it, so I have been putting a bit of time into it over the last few days. Its built using the carved foam technic that I pioneered with others about 20 years ago. Last night I hollowed the 2 fuselage halves and stuck them together. Building from foam is not to everyones taste, but its quick and light, and particularly effective for competitive Pistachios as you don't lose points for the under cambered wing section. I intend to complete the model as one flown by VF-17 in WWII. The parts in the photo weigh in at 1.04 grams, These models are so tiny I can't remember if thats good or not!
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Pistachio scale Vought F4U Corsair
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Richard Crossley
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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2017, 10:52:35 AM »

The weight sounds good to me although I have no experience of pistachio models.
What type of foam are you using and how thin can/do you carve it ?
I assume it is a messy process !!!  Smiley
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strat-o
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2017, 12:02:57 PM »

That's remarkable.  Does that work out to be about 1/48 scale?  Do you have a solution in mind for the canopy?  If I may suggest it, you can get clear heat shrink tubing that works well.  Simply make a small canopy plug (or use a canopy from a plastic model kit).  Cut a section of shrink wrap tubing, then place the plug inside the tubing and heat it up.  The tubing will hopefully shrink tightly around all contours.  Final step is to cut the finished canopy out.  (Note that certain clear heat shrink materials have excellent optical clarity.)

Marlin
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piecost
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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2017, 12:17:40 PM »

Richard, i have been an admirer of your foam models for some time and will appreciate any details of foam thicknesses and finishing techniques that you may give. Is that gull wing really carved in one piece?

I an especially interested in your paining technique and the resulting weight that is added. With my own attempts at light foam models; i found that that the airframe can be impressively light but the weight soon snowballs with items such as the propeller.

Cheers

Tim
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tom arnold
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2017, 12:56:22 PM »

While I have never made a flying foam model yet, I have carved a lot of foam forms to use in the Lost Foam process of building a fuselage. I have found that the mess of foam sandings can be almost totally eliminated by wiping the form with a really wet washcloth at regular intervals and doing the shaping over the trash can. The airborne particles are almost totally eliminated but it does slowly destroy cheap sandpaper.
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Rudder flutter
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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2017, 02:52:17 PM »

The weight sounds good to me although I have no experience of pistachio models.
What type of foam are you using and how thin can/do you carve it ?
I assume it is a messy process !!!  Smiley
Foam is about 1mm wall thickness on the fuselage, and its a white extruded foam. Floormate 200 by Dow is a good one to use too
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Richard Crossley
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« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2017, 02:54:53 PM »

That's remarkable.  Does that work out to be about 1/48 scale?  Do you have a solution in mind for the canopy?  If I may suggest it, you can get clear heat shrink tubing that works well.  Simply make a small canopy plug (or use a canopy from a plastic model kit).  Cut a section of shrink wrap tubing, then place the plug inside the tubing and heat it up.  The tubing will hopefully shrink tightly around all contours.  Final step is to cut the finished canopy out.  (Note that certain clear heat shrink materials have excellent optical clarity.)

Marlin
Its about 1/60th scale I think Marlin! Thanks for the canopy tip. I usually mould my own using acetate and the 'plunge method' (dolly on a stick) but your method sounds easier. I might give it a try. Cheers, Richard
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Richard Crossley
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« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2017, 03:00:32 PM »

Richard, i have been an admirer of your foam models for some time and will appreciate any details of foam thicknesses and finishing techniques that you may give. Is that gull wing really carved in one piece?

I an especially interested in your paining technique and the resulting weight that is added. With my own attempts at light foam models; i found that that the airframe can be impressively light but the weight soon snowballs with items such as the propeller.

Cheers

Tim
Hi Tim, Yes, the wing is carved from solid. Not as tricky as it sounds if you persevere. Cut the plan view to shape but slightly oversize, and tick enough, then stick paper template on the front view and start to carve. take it slow, bit by bit and keep changing the blade every 10 mins, and by the end of the evening the hardest part of the model is done. Its one of those things that you can overthink, but just going for it works!

I used to spray enamels, but have switched to Tamiya acrylic, Not sprayed these on foam before, but I'll do a few tests first. I used to spray a base coat first (which tends to raise the snap) then when dry flat off - it tends to act like a sealer, subsequent coats cover easily and smoothly.
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Richard Crossley
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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2017, 03:02:21 PM »

While I have never made a flying foam model yet, I have carved a lot of foam forms to use in the Lost Foam process of building a fuselage. I have found that the mess of foam sandings can be almost totally eliminated by wiping the form with a really wet washcloth at regular intervals and doing the shaping over the trash can. The airborne particles are almost totally eliminated but it does slowly destroy cheap sandpaper.
Great ideas. I have already got into trouble as the foam shavings (statically charged) have clung to the waste basket in the lounge, and half way up my leather chair!
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Richard Crossley
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« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2017, 03:47:06 AM »

Got a little more done last night. Cut the wing into the fuselage. The small segment you see in the photos is the belly portion cut away to allow the wing to seat. One advantage of foam, is once the basic components are made, you just cut and fit them together, no need for any local strengthening or internal structures, Its all stressed-skin. Although the Corsairs cranked wing makes it trickier than a conventional low-winger, the advantage of the angles means that no fiddly wing fillets are needed. Its a neat design.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Pistachio scale Vought F4U Corsair
Re: Pistachio scale Vought F4U Corsair
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Richard Crossley
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« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2017, 02:44:16 PM »

Look forward to seeing this one, Richard.
If it's anything like your Polikarpov it will do well .... is that model still flying btw. ?
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piecost
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« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2017, 06:43:49 PM »

Hello Richard. Would you mind giving more details of the foam; its name, its density (if you know) and where to get it? I recall that Floormate 200 was 20kg/m2, there were heavier grades of the blue and yellow foam of 25kg/m2. I think that depron is about 40Kg/m2 (depending on sheet thickness) but have never seen thick sheets of that material.

Cheers

Tim
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Sky9pilot
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« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2017, 08:04:02 PM »

When carving or sanding foam, I've found that the dryer sheet when rubbed on the foam will work the antistatic magic.  Keep it handy and wipe down the foam regularly and the static is mostly taken care of.  I buy a couple boxes when I'm at the Dollar Store so the wifey doesn't get made when drying clothes in the dryer!!! Roll Eyes Wink Cool
Sky9pilot
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