Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin  |  Contact Global Moderator
July 20, 2018, 10:46:45 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Hung - memorable sacrifices / moments  (Read 3715 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Kev
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 10
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 82

Topic starter


Ignore
« on: March 27, 2008, 04:35:19 PM »

I learnt about Hung a long time ago, through a failure of a dt on a hlg. Well, to be honest, it didn't fail, it activated the tip up boom in a strong thermal and carried on taking it up. I look back on lost models over the years and some stand out more than others.

Here's one.

It was a warm summer's day - flying at Church Fenton - 9 flights, 1 minute max and then onto flyoff flight if necessary. I was on a roll, flying a new own design I had made called Spirit of freedom - a V tail design and was the only one of its type I had built. I had started late morning just when the thermals were beginning and I was downwind watching and piggybacking the F1B fliers. When they went, a few seconds later, my thermister showed the bubble was moving and away I went. This one day, I was watching as a F1B was launched and I recognised the model and waited as it went over head and was storming upwards. So, gave the nod to my timekeeper and began the run on the grass, then onto the runway and with one huge launch, got the model off the top at an excellent height. She turned immediately and even though was under the f1B, she was climbing at a phenomenal rate. Watch was ticking, eyes were skyward and even at that moment, less than a few seconds into the flight, it was an easy first max.

Unfortunately, the only thing that was not ticking was the tomy timer and I could not hear it. The wake flier started his walk downwind and we walked, talked and watched as the hlg outclimbed his model and for a while (maybe two minutes), we shared the same air and were only feet apart. Incredible to watch, however, I knew I had had a failure and needed to start to run. The quicker I ran, the higher she went and teased me. As we both got to the end of the runway, the F1B's stab popped and the model came down flat in front of us.

However, the hlg was gone and away into the blue. We walked for a further ten minutes together and eventually, I lost the signal on the bug I had in there. Feeling a bit let down, I would get the car and come back and find her as there had been a good signal for a while and the battery was new. Sadly, despite two further days of searching a lot of square miles, there was no signal and the model was never found or returned. But, what made this sacrifice so memorable was as the gent and I walked back up the runway with the F1B in hand, in the silence of the air, something moved to our left. Unsure we stopped, nothing - continued and it came again. When we both turned round a few seconds later, there were about 8 or more deer stood looking at us in the silence having come out of the hedge.

We said nothing, watched them watching us. We walked a little more and on our next look, they had all vanished. It was worth the loss of the model, to be able to share something in that small moment of nature. Hung smiled in his own way on me that day - so what memorable sacrifices / dt failures have you had over the years. There is a story in everyone, lets hear yours. Cheesy

Kev
Who searched everywhere for that signal on the hlg tracker to no avail and still wondering what happened to it. Possibly came down in the river not too far away.
Logged
applehoney
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 254
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 3,073




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2008, 09:10:41 PM »

Nice story, mate. What sort of tracker were you using .....shouldn't have lost a signal that quickly?

Mine followed my Classic Glider as it circled miles away for over 90 minutes last September ... was still transmitting loud and clear when I switched off the receiver as I had to go back to the field .. and guided me back across NY next morning to locate the model.
Logged
Dan G.
OOS, November 2010
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 19
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 698



Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2008, 10:13:34 PM »

Hey ... Kev,

There's no reason to suspect your model didn't go too far away. Once it starts its decent, there's a good chance of snagging another thermal. Here in Edmonton, Alberta, I've had hlg s returned to me from all over the city, sometimes many miles away. And what of the ones we never hear from again? One A-2 was called in from 45 miles (75km) away (in a potato patch) -- it likely flew a meandering path there.

I can't admit to having encountered deer while retrieving, but I have had the cow scare.

Dan G.
Logged

Dan Garsonnin CA - Will be missed by all that knew him.
applehoney
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 254
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 3,073




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2008, 10:47:27 PM »

Quote
One A-2 was called in from 45 miles

Absolutely so. Kevin's mother once decided she wanted to tow up a glider ... just once; with some alongside instruction she got it up quite well ... too well ....

I spent next day searching a compass bearing without success; a month later a farmer called me and I picked it up about 70 miles from Topcliffe - figure it has ridge soared at Sutton Bank and later over the Hambleton Hills.

On the other hand, sometimes they don't go far. John O'Donnel lost an A/1 in an evening flyoff at Heath Common, near Wakefield. It was seen to land in the opposite suburbs of Wakefield the following morning, having circled in the warmth over the city all night.
Logged
Dan G.
OOS, November 2010
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 19
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 698



Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2008, 10:53:50 PM »

Far out! How extraordinary.

Dan G.
Logged

Dan Garsonnin CA - Will be missed by all that knew him.
hermit
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 51
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 702




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2008, 11:47:38 PM »

Truly! Does it count if I'm seeing one in my future? Roll Eyes ESP, Prescient Ability, a weird flavor of neurosis? Hopefully it will land in the courtyard of the castle I built up there. Really!

Hermit
Logged
bruce-ter
Guest

« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2008, 12:19:32 PM »

Just one, and I didn't even build it. Our club has started a new type of one design contest intended to increase participation. One member provides all the models (10 to 15) and to participate you make a mandatory donation. Last year John Buskell built a fist full of catapult gliders, all given a rough glide balance. The participants job was to finalize the trim for launch and glide. After spending much time getting the glide worked out from shoulder launches I managed a decent launch and transition but every other flight or so the little glider would spiral in, bummer.

John walks up, puts a little washin on the inside left panel. While explaining why he did this, John stops and says "Now would be a good time." OOS at 6 minutes, just for a 60 second max. We lost two of these gliders to OOS and had several multi-minute flights through the course of the day.

Bruce
Logged
applehoney
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 254
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 3,073




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2008, 01:10:37 PM »

I'm sure we can all recall memorable moments.

One such was the end-of-the-day presentation of prizes at a Leeds Rally at Elvington, Yorkshire, England.

About 5.30 pm, a warm summer late afternoon and by then flat calm. Throughout the whole proceeding an A/2 glider circled gracefully above the table at about 400/500 feet .. no drift .... and finally descended as the area cleared. Seemed a very appropriate close to a contest.
Logged
Dan G.
OOS, November 2010
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 19
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 698



Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2008, 10:34:43 PM »

Hey ... applehoney,

I couldn't stop thinking about that plane circling over the city all night ... it kept tugging at me, and then I remembered ... sometime about 1971, Aeromodeller published a little blurb about that event, didn't it? I may be trying too hard, but it does ring a bell.

Dan G.
Logged

Dan Garsonnin CA - Will be missed by all that knew him.
Dan G.
OOS, November 2010
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 19
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 698



Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2008, 10:41:24 PM »

Hey ... that story with John O'Donnel's A-1 circling over the city all night has the ring of an urban myth ... don't you think? Well ... this is one myth we won't ask the Myth Buster's on Discovery Channel to test.

Dan G.
Logged

Dan Garsonnin CA - Will be missed by all that knew him.
applehoney
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 254
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 3,073




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2008, 10:18:36 AM »

Dan,

O Ye Of Little Faith! No myth.

The occasion was one of the two Northern Area Mini 'Silent' Rallies held on Heath Common, Wakefield, which I organised and CD'd one year (the first was so successful I ran the second a couple of months later) and witnessed the model very slowly moving out and climbing over the power station and city. John subsequently reported the story of the model being seen to land by the person who contacted him.

Not sure if I still have the old 'Northern Area News' newsletters which I produced at that time but I'll check...

Jim

Later:  Have been looking through (and been distracted by) old copies of 'Northern Area News', of which I played a part in producing it monthly for almost six years - unfortunately some copies have been lost over time and still elude me despite past appeals back in the 'Olde Countrie' and unfortunately one such must carry the report/results of this contest .. but the year would be 1979. Browsing through these fading duplicated pages brings back many happy memories ... and it's also very sobering to note so many names of those who have since departed this life...
« Last Edit: March 29, 2008, 11:08:07 AM by applehoney » Logged
Dan G.
OOS, November 2010
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 19
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 698



Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2008, 01:54:13 AM »

Oh no ... applehoney ... far be it for me to question your word. I just said that it had "the ring" of an urban myth, and to that group over on Discovery Channel's Myth Busters, this would be sort of thing they would like to test -- is it a plausible myth or not? Except for any thing aerodynamic -- those guys haven't a clue and won't research the subject. They are always so surprised at how a sheet of plywood behaves in the wind, and when their cement (I kid you not -- you've heard of cement boats, haven't you?) glider with an aspect ratio of less than 1:1 has the glide of a ball bearing when launched at a quarter of its min flight speed.

Now where they did do a good job is with the myth of the kid, being handed too large a number of helium-filled balloons and is carried aloft -- to the cries of dismay and horror of everyone watching. Inside an aircraft hangar, they discover that it could happen, but for their ten-year old little girl, it took 350 fairly large party balloons to get her off the ground.
Logged

Dan Garsonnin CA - Will be missed by all that knew him.
Dan G.
OOS, November 2010
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 19
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 698



Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2008, 02:57:19 AM »

Hey ... I remember a time. which is a little reminiscent of hermit's parking-lot experience just described in another thread, and what a dimwit in my incident!

I'd been trimming my second A-2, the first of my own design, in fields behind my in-laws' house. I was by myself and had put a flight up. The flight wasn't memorable, but it did land near or on an adjacent highway. I was beating it as fast as I could to save it, when I saw, in the distance, a station wagon stop, someone got out, fussed a bit -- I could see wing tips -- got back into the car, and drove away. My screams and yells and frantic waving of arms mattered not a jot. He/she had never looked up, or around.

In wretched disbelief, I angled my return so I would end up at the house, and trudged home. But ... lo and behold ... as I entered the yard, that same station-wagon was coming up the driveway. And who was stepping out with my plane, face a-beaming, but the vice principal from the high school I had attended just two years before. But something was wrong. One of the wing roots was shredded, all broken spars and ply-ribs. He explained that it just wouldn't be fit into the car, so he broke it in two ... it shouldn't be too hard to repair.

I thanked him, accepting the pieces, and swiveled to leave. I had not the self-control, and couldn't see the point, to explain that all he'd had to do was tug gently and the two wings would have slipped off their twin wire sleeve mounts.

Dan G.
Logged

Dan Garsonnin CA - Will be missed by all that knew him.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!