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Author Topic: Tissue covering of Seaplane hulls  (Read 438 times)
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KVP
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« on: January 19, 2018, 03:46:45 PM »

Oh wise forum,

I have been building and flying rubber powered models on and off for the past 15 years. The one part I struggle with the most is tissue covering of concave surfaces on seaplane hulls; so as a result I have avoided building them. The last one I attempted was the Easy Built Silver Lancer. I couldn't get the tissue to stay in the concave area of the hull so I added extra stringers and used strips of tissue to cover the hull. It didn't look nice as it had a "step" appearance as it moved to the "bow" of the hull. I removed this tissue and added thin balsa strips as if I was doing a nose cowl infill. It took a long time, looked good, but I suffered a weight penalty and a couple of hard landings later, the hull infills started to come unstuck causing irreparable damage.

I am sure there is a better more simple way of doing it, I just haven't been able to find it yet.

What methods do you use to covers these types of areas?

Thanks in advance.

KVP
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dputt7
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2018, 01:57:05 AM »

Hi KVP, 
             Do you mean trying to get the tissue to adhere to the concave curve on the underside, the same as covering an undercambered wing?

             For this I give the frame a couple of coats of dope  then apply the tissue using thinners, at each rib/former I run 70/30 thinner/ dope mix with a brush to make it stick firmly, I also rub the joint with my finger to seal it properly and work out any wrinkles. I then cover the rest of the wing/ fuselage and then water shrink etc.
Hope this helps.
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dieterperiperi
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2018, 02:48:12 AM »

Would sheeting these areas with very light and flexible 1/32 sheet be a better material perhaps?
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KVP
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« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2018, 03:42:18 PM »

Hi dputt7,

That is correct; although I use a different method for under camber wings. For these areas I use strips of tissue and attach them to between the spars and run them for wing root to wing tip similar to covering a multi stringer fuselage. Depending on the model, I would add addition l spars to the wing so the lower skin could have a smoother contour.

I think it might be time for me to do some quick hull sections builds to sort out my technique before I get into another seaplane build..........

dieterperiperi, I tried to "plank" a hull like a boat builder, I found out why I don't build wooden boats....... ;-). However I have also considered the "f" word (foam) to get the smooth hull surface, but I would like to keep to more "traditional" materials/methods for now.

Thanks for the tips
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