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Author Topic: What should I build next? Recommendations wanted.  (Read 688 times)
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Dan Snow
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« on: August 21, 2018, 08:40:01 PM »

While waiting for FAI to get back from holiday and ship the rubber I ordered I want to start my next model. Leaning towards scale, laser cut a requirement, no more die squished.  I Plan to do some building from plans but not just yet.

So, what should I consider next? Something south of $35 would be best.
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mescal1
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« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2018, 09:13:31 PM »

Under $35?  Volare has some nice short kits for $10-25.  I built the Ford Stout and had great luck with it.  I've also got the Judy, peanut Chambermaid, Jackrabbit, Starliner, Kokusai Ta-go and Pegna.  All come with very nice plans and look like they'd fly well.  We really like the embryo's.  Between my daughter and I we've probably built 5 of them.  I like the Durham Mystery Embryo but my daughter took first in the Embryo NBM and second in Embryo at the FAC Nats this year with her Bad Axe embryo (she's 14.)  Here's a link.   https://volareproducts.com/BUY/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=2_18   
If you wanted to spend a little more Easy Built Models has some great kits.  Erika is currently building the Dime scale staggerwing and it's going together easily ($32.95).  The Mr. Smoothie kits when built have been flying away for years and look great ($42.95).  He's also got a Chambermaid kit that flies like... like a Chambermaid!  https://easybuiltmodels.com/lc.htm   P.T. Aviation has some short
kits as well.  I built the Miss Worlds Fair and really liked the kit.  I've also got the Barracuda short kit that came with a canopy.  That was modeled off Chris Starleaf's plan so you know it'll be good.  https://ptaviationmodels.com/t/ww-ii.  I've built a few Dumas Kits but I don't really like the 17" kits, they seem heavy for their size.  I do like the bigger kits because they are easier to lighten, really like the 24" racers and the Gee Bee E.  I hear Guillows has laser cut their Hellcat which is surprisingly a nice kit and flies well.  Good luck!
Mike
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p40qmilj
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2018, 06:54:19 AM »

 Grin  go to cb model designs and order the p40 q it is a great build
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Dan Snow
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2018, 07:04:13 AM »

Good suggestions gang, thanks.

I probably won't go with a short kit yet as I have no balsa, ply or basswood stock and would have to make the trek to the hobby store. Sadly what was once a great hobby store is now primarily a purveyor of foam and fiberglass ARF aircraft. Their selection of balsa models is 1/10 of what it was.
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Konrad
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« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2018, 09:36:20 AM »

Don, While I love what the cottage industry is offering us, I’d like to see you stick with “known” kit manufactures Like Guillow, Dumas and the latter Easy Built kits.

I’d also like to see your next kit be different than the Guillow Chipmunk (sheet sides). As I recall you had some issues with the wood in the 900 series, in that the parts were delicate. At this stage going with kits cut from contest balsa might actually be frustrating. I think heavier builds might be an advantage.

 I think Guillow kits are still one of the best values. As you like scale I’d like to recommend the 700 series Fairchild 24. This is the best flying scale Guillow kit and it is a classic box ladder build. The wings are still the simple rib style construction. Another great kit is the 300 series PC-6 this uses clam shell fuselage construction. And with all the fuselage formers that laser cutting really come into its own.

I think any of the high winged 300 series would make a good second kit.

If looking to experiment with flight trimming I like the 700 series Arrow. I think it is a bit of a simple build so I’d look at the Fairchild and PC-6 first.

I think this time around doing some of the kit improvements discussed in Don Ross’s book would also be advantageous. You might want to try making the advanced model from Don’s book. You would learn a lot about scratch building and I know it is well within your capabilities.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2018, 10:42:53 AM by Konrad » Logged

Cut it twice and it's still too short!
flydean1
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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2018, 10:28:27 AM »

mescal1 gave you great advice.  I would seriously consider his recommendation on full kits.  It takes some time to build up an inventory of light balsa.  That will come.
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Andrew Darby
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« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2018, 03:31:07 PM »

Or...

http://www.ffscale.co.uk/comper.htm

Highly recommended...

Andrew
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Dan Snow
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« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2018, 09:50:16 AM »

I want to thank everyone for their suggestions, they added a couple more planes to my bucket list. I really did go look at all of them. After going back and forth between manufacturers and designs and price and everything else, I finally decided on......


The Dumas 30" DeHavilland Beaver!!  It's high wing, robust, BIG and I've always liked it's looks. I might make the landing gear plug in and then create a set of floats for static display.  I don't plan to enter it in competition, I just want a model I can go out and fly, that looks good, and is sturdy enough I don't have to be in constant fear that I'm going to break something just picking it up.

I have ordered the kit from Tower Hobbies, should have it mid next week. They were the best price I found by at least $3.  I did find the kit on Amazon for $85! That's right, Eighty-Five freaking dollars!!! I double checked, it is the exact kit I found at Tower and several other sites for $28-$35.  

I'll start a thread when I get the kit and get started, since this is only my second rubber powered model so I'm sure I'll have lots of questions.  Such as: Is the supplied tissue really that bad? Several posts I saw recommended trashing the supplied tissue and replacing it with Esaki.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2018, 11:52:18 AM by Dan Snow » Logged
Konrad
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« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2018, 10:11:59 AM »

Dan, The Dumas 30" box ladder models are great.  As with all radials watch the weight in the tail. I know this kind of defeats some of the idea of laser cutting but I'd laminate the tail outlines. Please don't use CA for the structure of this model.

Also the landing gear mount is far too delicate. I'd make a torsion style mount. You'll need the nose weight anyway.
http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?topic=12443.0

The tissue in the kit is more than adequate. But Eskai is the best and you will pass out when you see the price. It is worth it, but for a beginner (2nd model) I think I'd stay with the tissue in the box.
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Cut it twice and it's still too short!
Pete Fardell
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« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2018, 10:28:03 AM »

Good choice, Dan. I'll watch with interest as I've not built this one yet but do like the Dumas 30" range. I've made the Eindecker and Storch so far, both of which went together easily and fly quite well. I used the kit wood with very few deviations from the plan, but to fit in with my colour choices I did use other tissue. My only problem (with both models) was that the wings came loose on heavy landings (aka minor crashes) so I ended up strengthening the wing/fus joints. The Beaver might be better designed in that regard though.
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mescal1
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« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2018, 11:42:29 AM »

Is the supplied tissue really that bad?  No, not really.  There are a few disadvantages compared to Esaki though.  It's heavier, not a lot and not enough to stop me from using it.  It doesn't have any wet strength.  Big difference and enough to make me reluctant to use it.  I don't usually cover with wet tissue but when I do, it would practically be impossible with domestic tissue.  The early morning dew was the biggest drawback for me.  I was constantly repairing holes in the tissue because it is so fragile when damp.  Domestic tissue also doesn't seem to shrink as nicely as Esaki.  Some domestic has a grain but most I've come across don't.  You'll be more likely to get a warp because the shrinking doesn't seem to be even across a sheet.  The advantages are the many different colors, cheaper price and it's easily available.  I still use it but no longer for scale models.  For scale, I strictly use Esaki and Design Master Floral Spray Paint.  The Design Master paint is very light and is water resistant enough for me and I can buy it locally at Michael's and AC Moore. 
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Dan Snow
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« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2018, 11:56:38 AM »

Konrad, why do you recommend NOT using CA for this? I have built dozens of flying models from tiny single channel to multi engine ones using at various times CA, epoxy, wood glue and other assorted adhesives.  I even used Ambroid way, way way back. Smiley
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Konrad
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« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2018, 12:26:35 PM »

Structurally. CA is brittle with the resultant joint failing very easily should the structure flex or be subject to impacts. The only benefit of CA is in the use of the "thin stuff" as it can harden the balsa, if this is desired.

Aesthetically. CA results in lumpy surfaces that show through the covering. The above mentioned hardening means that it is all but impossible to sand the glue joint without under cutting the surrounding soft balsa. This becomes more and more of an issue as you move from balsa that is kin to oak and move towards contest grade balsa wood. True, all sanding should be done with the paper bound to a sanding block, and this helps a great deal. But with these light stick structures you will see all the CA glue joints as raised bumps in the covering. Titebond or superphat glue is still the best.  Ambroid and Ducro are still good but you must wait for these glues to fully dry before handling the parts. With Titebond you can handle the parts when the glue is 3/4 dried.

I am sorry to say that today’s Ambroid is not the glue of our youth!

I still use CA where I think the glue joint will not be adjacent to the covering. I also use CA where there is more contact area than just the end of a 3/32 stick.

This model uses all sorts of adhesives where appropriate. But it is not a stick and tissue type build.
http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?topic=22619.0
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Cut it twice and it's still too short!
lincoln
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« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2018, 01:49:35 PM »

CA is very convenient, and, like computers, it enables us to make mistakes faster than ever before.
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Konrad
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« Reply #14 on: August 24, 2018, 01:51:12 PM »

CA is very convenient, and, like computers, it enables us to make mistakes faster than ever before.
LOL! Roll Eyes
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Dan Snow
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« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2018, 05:56:40 PM »

I have been tracking the progress of the kit and it is taking a weird path. It started in Champaign, IL and then went to Norborne, MO. From there it hit Canadian, TX and then on to Ganado, AZ.  The weird part is that these are no where near a major east west highway nor are they all on a railroad.  In spite of this it seems to be making good time, I expect to see it Monday or Tuesday.
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Dan Snow
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« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2018, 07:02:27 PM »

I MIGHT have the kit tomorrow. Tower uses the pain in the arse USPS to make the final delivery from destination city to home. It arrived in my town Monday, and I MIGHT get it tomorrow!! 3 days to go what, maybe 10-15 miles?  Oh well, not much I can do about it!  Grin
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Indoorflyer
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« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2018, 10:55:41 PM »

Holy crap! Believe it or not, I went to High School in Ganado, AZ.   86505!  Can remember the first time a "Federal Express" delivery van came to our little community...  (drove out from Albuquerque, NM)
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