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Author Topic: The mystery of building rubber motors  (Read 416 times)
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Dan Snow
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« on: October 27, 2018, 11:51:04 AM »

I give up, even after 3 attempts running the picture through the Hip Pocket Resizer it will not load.

Anyway:

I am brand new to rubber free flight, so my knowledge base on building motors is still somewhat south of zero.  I've read articles about using hooks, rings and such on the end of the motor to attach to the prop shaft.

I made a motor of 4 strands of 3/32, and attached a split ring using a cotton thread binding like the example in the photo (That will not load!) to hold it in place.  My question is how do I keep the ring from falling off of the prop shaft if there is any slack iin the motor when unwound?
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VictorY
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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2018, 11:38:24 AM »

Try IrfanView for resizing your photos. Just open the file, click re-size, pick size, then save to a new file. Done! It's free too.

I don't have a whole lot of experience yet but I reckon some sort of home made auto stop feature or a Gizmo Geezer front end will be required to keep tension on a motor when it's unwound.
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Indoorflyer
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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2018, 12:25:27 PM »

Dan, if you're trying to attach a picture to a post, and "Preview" the draft post, I believe the image gets stripped from the post. (You can alway go back and "modify" your post if needed.  Must do this within an hour or so, otherwise the option expires)  Other possibility is file size is still too large.  Has to be <400KB.
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LASTWOODSMAN
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« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2018, 12:48:31 PM »

Hi Dan.  I like to start by making the rubber motor just a little shorter than the prop hook to rear peg distance, in order to get enough tension to hold the prop block on.     Then it is easy to put finger winds on, a little bit more for each flight, as you begin flight trimming adjustments.   Once you get longer and longer flights that are finger wound, you can work up to longer rubber motors, and stretch winding in a winding stooge.    Smiley

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tom arnold
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« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2018, 07:35:25 PM »

Dan, I would highly recommend small rubber O rings that you can get at the hardware store. Pick the smallest and thickest that you can find. Loop your motor through it and it will make attaching the wound motor to the prop hook sooooooo easy. When you bend the Reverse-S prop hook just make  sure that there is a tight opening through the bent wire shaft such that the rubber O ring "snaps" into place and it won't come out at  the end of a motor run.
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Squid61
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« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2018, 08:08:55 PM »

I've had the best success taking a very small rubber band and looping it on the motor rubber at the prop end, it just needs to be tight enough to prevent it from moving on it's own.  After the motor rubber is put on the hook I roll the small rubber band up to the hook so it's snug. Doesn't add vibration, doesn't let the motor slip off the prop hook, weighs very little, costs very little and it's reliable.
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Tapio Linkosalo
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« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2018, 01:12:31 AM »

I've had the best success taking a very small rubber band and looping it on the motor rubber at the prop end, it just needs to be tight enough to prevent it from moving on it's own.  After the motor rubber is put on the hook I roll the small rubber band up to the hook so it's snug. Doesn't add vibration, doesn't let the motor slip off the prop hook, weighs very little, costs very little and it's reliable.

Me too. In P-30 I use motors that are longer than the motor tube (needed for the prop wedge freewheeler to work), and many years ago I lost a prop when the nose block popped off after landing, and some kind soul retrieved my model without noticing that the prop was missing. Since then  I have used the trick as Squid suggests, attaching the prop hook to the motor. So that even if the nose block pops off the model, the prop is still retained by the motor. Has worked for a couple of decades!

 
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