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Author Topic: What trainer did you like?  (Read 2429 times)
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Bargle
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« Reply #25 on: November 11, 2008, 08:16:53 PM »

I had 2, in a manner of speaking. My first flying model airplane of any type was a Scientific L-19 log and plank kit. It got partially built, but never flew. The first U/C I actually flew was a Scientific Big Otto. While it looks like a combat model, it didn't fly like one. Actually flew fairly slow and was stable. Much better than the various Cox plastic planes I had seen others fly. The Otto would actually glide after the engine shut off, rather than drop like a stone. I flew it, crashed it, patched it and flew it some more until finally the nose mount section got so soaked, I couldn't glue it back on any more. Followed with a number of kits and homebuilts. I've still got several U/Cs in various stages of construction, including one that's been completed, but never flown.
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LeagueCityRalph
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« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2008, 02:35:01 AM »

Anyone remember "Fixit Wright"? It was a 1-page feature in all the old Flying Models mags. Sometime in the late-50's, there was an issue devoted to simple trainers; a NorthWest slip-together HLG converted to U/C. A project so simple a 10-year-old could do it with little or no supervision - I know!

1) Cut off the fuselage at the forward end of the wing slot.
2) Add wedge-shaped firewall support blocks with a cutout in to accommodate the wing, which is mounted far forward
3) Drill the 1/8" ply firewall and install blind nuts
4) Cut the Stab and Elevator apart, and hinge them
5) Glue in the Stab, after cutting a clearance notch for elevator movement - Slip in the Perfect Elevator control horn
6) Add a basic control system (Remember to add a 3/32" ply doubler where the Bellcrank mounts)
7) Paint with 3 coats of clear Butyrate Dope
Cool Mount the (Baby Bee) engine and go fly

No landing gear; just a simple hand launch and land in the grass. Good for 100's of flights, and when you finally kill it, you can build another in a day!

Today, I truly believe the best trainer on the market is one of the U-Key series, produced by Jim Pearson (ModelWings@aol.com). A simple, sturdy ARF that can be ready to fly in 4 days (3 of these are for paint and glue drying!) Wings are already covered with Monokote, Complete tail section is built, shaped, and installed. Stan/Elevator already covered with Monokote and hinged.

I have a 4-page bulletin from the Tulsa (OK) Glue Dobbers on making a few small improvements to the U-Key, which are not truly necessary, but make it even more durable and easily repairable. Contact me for a email copy.


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bob werle
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« Reply #27 on: January 09, 2009, 11:56:42 PM »

The best trainer I had was an old Testers Junior I think. I was a solid balsa profile with a "H" crutch in front for an upright engine. It had been repaired so many times the front was replaced with 3/4" thick oak crutch. It had about a 38" wingspan and I had an old Redhead McCoy .35. You couldn't kill the thing
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DaddyO
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« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2009, 03:32:12 AM »

I loved my old Warlord ... not ideal as a trainer, but I built a low aspect ratio version powered with a 1.5cc diesel that flew on 40-45' lines as a trainer for my girlfriend who managed to learn to fly within a couple of sessioms (I'll see if I can find a pic.) (that's a pic of the trainer not the girlfriend) Grin

Anyway - the thing was light (ish), simple to build/repair (covered in Tex film), had a small fuel tank (important to stop dizziness) and it could be planted then shaken off and reflown on the same day
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The Kiwi
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« Reply #29 on: March 14, 2009, 11:23:00 PM »

My first model was a Guillows II trainer with a K&B .29. Kinda like an early rat racer. I remember that my break in consisted of running screaming bench runs until it quit locking up. Sigh Embarrassed

I was having a terrible time with spark ignition models when first interested in C/L planes -- I never saw anyone else fly one (sparkie), so I didn't know until later that unlike a glow engine, you had to adjust the advance after it was running. But I could get a lovely barely used .49 or .51 or .60 sparkie engine for about a dollar in 1950, and the glow engines with any size to them cost $15, new, and weren't being offered used, yet.

One summer in Texas (we lived in California when I was a little scamp), I flew a Guillows Trainer III with a Torp 29 glow engine, and was thrilled with it. I eventually found a used one of those for $7, bought that kit, and started flying a lot, at least when I could afford props and fuel. Lots better than the half-lap and whoops-it's dead attempts with the ignition engines. I eventually had several 049 and 09 sized models & engines, but had poor luck with all of that size until I bought a Space Bug instead of whatever else I had, such as all those awful OK Cubs.

It was 1951 or so when I built a plane a lot like a Super Clown, but I think it was from someone besides PDQ, it didn't last terribly long, but between the Trainer III and whatever that profile thing was, I was looping, flying inverted, and getting interested in building from plans by 1952.
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gcb
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« Reply #30 on: April 04, 2011, 10:48:50 PM »

I realize that this is a very old thread but it's time to revive it.

My first planes were various Scientific "Hollow Logs" powered by the, then new, Space Bug Junior. That was in 1953 and I'm still at it.

Were I to be starting today, I would use a solid wing 1/2A like the SIG Skyray. By being able to adjust control movement, it will take you through basic flight and some basic stunts. I keep a couple of Skyrays and a Brodak Basic Trainer handy "just in case".

For a plane that does not have adjustable controls, narrow spacing at the handle can supply minimal control movement. Space the lines further apart as you learn to fly better, but don't space further apart than the width at the bellcrank which supplies a 1:1 movement.

George
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greggles47
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« Reply #31 on: April 22, 2011, 08:14:45 AM »

I learnt to fly on a Taipan Trainer, with a Taipan 2.5 diesel.

I don't have any pics, but it was similar to the earlier Sabre Trainer, which one of the Sydney clubs uses for a fun racing class. For racing, built as per plan (wing can be set at 0deg incidence), 2.5 plain bearing motor. 100 laps, & 2 pit stops. What a blast! As well as being a good training ground for racing pilots.

Plan now in the Plan Gallery.

Regards
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bigrip74
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« Reply #32 on: August 21, 2011, 09:51:28 PM »

I think that I have flown every 1/2A kit there was available in the early 1960's, but the trainer that I learned how to fly and become proficient on was the Cox PT19 that plastic bomb that was suppose to come apart when you banged it up too hard and I use to carry a bag of no. 32 and 64 rubber bands so I could keep flying the entier day. The built up kits did not come till later.

Bob
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Stefoc
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« Reply #33 on: August 16, 2012, 06:41:37 AM »

Hi all,
in Italy we use as a trainer models with engine .09 - .15.

I used a Rodeino and I almost finished a Rodeo.

I enclose some pictures

 Grin
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Steve Thornton
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« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2013, 04:46:26 PM »

I just finished this White Lightning.  What a beautiful design.  I want to learn inverted flight and having ended the life of 4 Fox35 size planes I decided to take the advice of some sage members of my club and use a 1/2A for that.  Never realized how I would get hooked on these planes.  I am learning a lot about weight, strength, and the other basics.  This one is heavy 10.05 oz. but it is my first and the next one will be covered in dyed tissue, as Bruce suggested, and not rattle can("weight you can spray on an airplane!")  I would appreciate any advice on wood selection for the wing, mine tends to twist a bit-probably from the paint, although I did cover it with light silkspan.  I would also like a source for slide style line clips for 1/2A.  Thanks again for all the help I have gotten from this forum-you 'da bes'!
Steve Thornton
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greggles47
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« Reply #35 on: September 30, 2013, 05:54:40 AM »

Steve,

Nice looking model. Looks kinda too nice to risk learning inverted. I think I learned more inverted from flying Peacemakers and combat wings. The wings have an added crash resistance which is really helpful, remembering that up means down.

The other inverted tip I got & used was to hold the handle sideways so that if I stopped rotating the plane pulled the down line and the model rose.

For line connectors I prefer the Hawaian clip style connector - available in many weight sizes from good tackle stores.

Good luck mate.

Greg
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