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Author Topic: LPP's at USIC 2011  (Read 1134 times)
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ykleetx
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« on: June 15, 2011, 03:01:29 AM »

The top LPP's from USIC 2011.

Photo 1: Tom Iacobellis
Photo 2: Bill Gowen
Photo 3: Max Zaluska
Photo 4: John Kagan
Photo 5: Leo Pilachowski
Photo 6: Walt Van Gorder

Max Zaluska's LPP is the only one without tip plates.  Others have only tip plates on the wing, with no dihedral.  The winner, Tom Iacobellis, has tip plates and wing dihedral.

Who knows what the winning formula is ...

Enjoy.

-Kang
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ykleetx
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2011, 07:44:07 PM »

Here are some more  Smiley

Photo 1: Larry Cailliau, 6-time USIC LPP champion
Photo 2: Yuan Kang Lee
Photo 3: Brett Sanborn, 3-time top 3
Photo 4: Tom Sova, 3-time USIC LPP champion
Photo 5: Jim Richmond, 2-time USIC LPP champion


Although the LPP is a model that the beginner can build and fly, it takes experience and expertise to fly it well.  It is difficult to reach the podium at USIC.   (I don't know why  Undecided )

The LPP is the most popular event at USIC today and has been for some time.  At one time, the EZB was more popular; but that's now history.

The LPP is the first indoor model I built, and I would recommend it as a starting point to get into Indoor Free Flight.

See LPP builds by Olbill and Hepcat elsewhere on HPA.

-Kang
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-John-
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« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2011, 12:07:01 AM »

Thanks Kang,
...and now to build a reasonably good LPP for next year after flying the Pro-Am(hum, Undecided who's should I copy?)
Very easy going and relaxed flying btw...

Maybe I could cajole Romash into parting with some of that 1999 super motor material!

John
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Olbill
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« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2011, 10:10:51 AM »

Mine is only the second best LPP currently flying but it's the easiest to build!
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-John-
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« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2011, 11:16:07 PM »

Olbill, on first glance your LPP looks difficult to build; probably because of the carbon. I do like the idea of using carbon though.

From a beginners point of view it looks like the prop and motor is the real key to the duration equation on these things(??)

Thanks again,
John
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Olbill
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« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2011, 04:17:56 PM »

John
The first step in the actual build of an indoor model is finding the right wood for everything. Then once you've found some pieces that look okay you have to cut some up and do testing to see if it meets your expectations. Wing and stab spars are possibly the most critical parts to get right. For my wing and stab spars I pull some .020" rods out of the box and start building. What could be easier than that?

Yes the prop and motor are important and the prop comes first. Once you've made your best attempt at a prop you need to match the motor to the prop - or at least that's how the common story goes. For me I just use the longest motor I can without having tangles that ruin the flight. Wind the stew out of it, back off to a launch torque that is suitable for the flying site and let 'er rip. If the model lands with 50% of the turns you put in then your motor isn't thick enough.

Just as an example look at these numbers from the Kang LPP Challenge in a low Cat 1 site:

Ceiling height 22'-3"
Motor: 22.5" x 2.62g 5/99
Turns in: 2980
Torque max: .72 in-oz
Turns backed off: 630
Launch torque: .23 in-oz
Turns remaining: 1080
Flight time: 8:31

For my 15:15 second place at USIC the motor was 22" x 2.39g. So it's a pretty good bet that a motor around 2.5g x 22" or so long is going to do a good job in most any venue. This might not actually be the optimum size motor but for this point in time it's a good starting point.

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