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Author Topic: Getting Old  (Read 3621 times)
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50+AirYears
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« Reply #25 on: October 15, 2010, 05:27:54 PM »

On a somewhat more dreary side of getting older, in the last three months, my 87 year old aunt was diagnosed with Alzhiemer's, after several bouts with skin cancer. Then, one Sunday, she forgot she had been to Mass, decided to walk the 10 blocks to church. Tripped on a curb. Cracked her pelvis, dislocated a shoulder, mild concussion. Her 89 year old husband came down with some problems of his own. In therapy at a nursing home last week, she had a blood clot enter a lung. While visiting her in intensive care, he contracted a bacterial pneumonia. They were in separate treatment rooms for almost a week. She is now home, he has just had the breathing and feeding tubes removed, and is conscious and feisty. Should possibly be released next week.

Old age ain't for the weak! The weak won't make it there.
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NormF
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« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2010, 05:53:54 PM »

I wrote this for the Stunt forum and it got mixed reviews. Also, this thread was started a while back, but what the heck:

Forget The Kids!
They'll do fine without us. I taught HS band for 30+ years. These kids are as sharp or sharper than we ever were. They have the patience and skill to master a musical instrument or a piece of equipment way beyond many of our abilities. Sure, expose them to the hobby, help them if they show interest, but we're never going to see 50 - 75 kids lined up waiting for a timer at the Nats!

A lot of us came from an era when we could take our Firebaby to the empty lot next door and fly til' dark. Today, how do you justify building a plane and then getting your folks to drive you 30 miles to a controline field (70 - 200 miles for FF!)? Kids want something they can do everyday, not once a month and that's something we wanted and did when we were young.

How can we help our hobby? What's been the driving economic force for the last fifty/sixty years? The Baby Boomer's. From Howdy Doody, the Ford Mustang, SUV's, fast food, you name it. It's been geared to this generation and whats happening to them now? - they're retiring. They have money, transportation, time and desire - the best part? They remember that Firebaby they flew as kid!

A lot of them are flying R/C. Join the local R/C club and show your ukie. Build an electric and fly it in your local park. Ask if you can display a U/C in the local big box hobby/toy store (instead of complaining they don't carry stunt fuel). Post your club info on the bulletin board.

When the guy shows up at the field, say hello, answer his questions, stick a handle in his hands - keep Mr. Negativeknowitall away from this guy.

BTW , even if the guy is an R/C'er, you can help them. It's about model planes.

My 2cents

- Norm Furutani, AMA 9408
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crashcaley
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« Reply #27 on: October 15, 2010, 06:09:15 PM »

Norm, though not a Control Line person, I watched when I was a single digit midget. That was so fun, just watching. You hit the nail on the head with what you related. There will be a few very young people who might get interested, but the oldsters who remember doing or watching it may again be attracted. At least I hope so.

Caley
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robert mathison
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« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2010, 08:01:14 AM »

HI all,
I just lost my flying buddy of some 58 YRS. this is a sad post to let every know that Willis Swindell had a HEART ATT. and passed away . for all that knew him this is a bad day. this is a late post but I just did not feel up to it.

Bob
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EVER DAY FLYING IS A GREAT DAY WHEN YOU ARE WITH YOUR BUDDYS .
crashcaley
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« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2010, 10:27:50 AM »

Bob, I'm saddened that Willis, your flying pal as passed on to the flying circles in the sky. I wish you the best at this time of grief, and the best to those who loved him.

Caley
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robert mathison
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« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2010, 01:09:21 PM »

Caley thank you this is very hard on me at this time.

Bob
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EVER DAY FLYING IS A GREAT DAY WHEN YOU ARE WITH YOUR BUDDYS .
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« Reply #31 on: January 10, 2011, 06:18:52 PM »

Hi Everyone
Thought I'd throw my 2 cents in. LOL I started out flying the old cox ready made cl'ers. Might get more young ones interested if they were still available. Used to fly in a creamery.Blacktop with lots of potholes.Broke a few trying to do loops and such. Built a lil satan from a kit. Then discovered free flight.Used engines from the broken plastic planes to power mostly sniffers. Fill the tank and turn em loose, no dt. Rarely got to fly one twice but boy what fun. I'm just getting back into the hobby and I'm a newby here. My interest is mainly rubber now. Having a hard time trying to build as I had a stroke a few years back and break more than I build. Youngsters in this area seem to be more interested in video games than aircraft. Guess I was lucky to have grown up when I did. My dad used to take us to a small airport once in a while on Sundays and we'd watch the light planes take off and land. There was an old biplane in one of the hangers there fabric tattered and hanging. He picked me up and sat me in the rear cockpit and that was it for me. From that time on anything light plane I was ready for especially if it had two wings.

Gary
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greggles47
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« Reply #32 on: January 11, 2011, 06:04:46 AM »

Hi Gary,
Welcome to the Forum, hope you can find stuff that helps you.

I think kids today just don't get excited about aircraft like our generation. I can still remember hearing a CL model and chasing around our streets until I tracked it down, just to watch it.

Good luck with your building and flying.

Regards

Greg
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flyright
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« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2011, 12:25:58 PM »

Control line flying is like quail hunting...no place to fly anymore..especially for the younger folks...most can not afford to join AMA much less an expensive RC club that might let them fly CL. Also little or no advertising in magazines much. Flying models has a great CL section but I can't buy it on the store shelf any longer ..now only by subscription. I fly free flight and enjoy it buy I absolutely love CL.
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« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2011, 03:57:45 PM »

I would think that with the advent of electric power for C/L it would be fairly easy to find a place to fly. It seems like any schoolyard would do.
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Garf
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« Reply #35 on: January 28, 2011, 11:52:16 AM »

I recently retired at 62. I have to drive 30 miles once a week to fly C/L. I'm usually alone with my one flying partner, although there are 3 more oldsters that occasionally show up, when the weather is perfect. No young people at all.
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« Reply #36 on: December 25, 2011, 01:05:05 PM »

I was just browsing this thread and came upon Al Backstrom's post. It gave me an eerie feeling reading it knowing he is no longer with us. Given the average age of participants in this hobby, this will probably happen more and more often the longer HPA is around. I wonder if there is a way we can respectfully designate past posts by deceased members as such. I think it would be a nice way to honor and memorialize them. Maybe a special icon under their name. Just thinkin' out loud.

Al was a very talented gentleman and I'm proud to say I knew and flew with him when he lived in Denton County, Texas.

Besides his model aircraft activities -his rubber scale Vought Flying Pancake was amazing- he also designed, built and flew an FAA Experimental Category aircraft known as the Backstrom Flying Plank. This tail-less flying wing was powered by a pusher-mounted engine and, like Al, was a marvelous thing.

Monte
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Monte Miller
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montmil
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« Reply #37 on: December 25, 2011, 03:17:17 PM »

Getting old, no new blood entering the sport, kids aren't interested...

I'm a newbie to this forum, but not to several organizations and groups that voice this very same concern: Where are the kids that will carry on the hobby, sport, club, etc?

Gotta question for the folks reading this thread. What are you, personally, doing to encourage, introduce and promote the sport of model aviation? This is simply a rhetorical question and is not aimed at any one person; but let's think about potential solutions.

I'm 65 years old. I enjoy the four different motorcycles in my shop. I'm a private pilot with two FAA certified home-built and flown experimental-category aircraft in my log book. I'm an Eagle Scout. I've retired for a second time after fifteen years with our local school district. Every one of the topics mentioned has involved getting youngsters involved in the activities.

How? Volunteer.

Boy Scouts have an aviation merit badge. Seek out local Boy Scout troops and volunteer as a merit badge counselor. Scouts can construct models as a requirement for the badge. Show 'em your shop, your model aircraft, your flying site. Invite them to go flying with you and include their parents. I've done it and I promise it works. Get 'em away from the video games.

As a pilot with the USAFAux and the Experimental Aircraft Assn, we have held "Open Cockpit Day" events publicized by local news media. Invite families. Sell the program.

It may be that the reason youngsters are not coming into the hobby is that they have no idea how to do so. Ask your Parks & Rec Dept if your model club could hold a Saturday HLG building class in a city facility. Publicize the event. Build simple planes and show the kids how to build, trim and fly. Done that, too.

My R/C electric Playboy was a kid magnet at the local flying filed. I'd get the plane up to altitude, shut down the motor, trim it for level flight and hand the transmitter to a young boy that was watching. Asked him to keep it in sight. Then, I'd just walk off for a couple minutes. Guess what he talked about at home and school all the next day.

Y'all get the idea. Next time you're out flying, get a young boy or girl to assist with some small chore. Let them get a little taste and they may be back next time.

I'm going out to the shop and mess with the Sig Chipmunk kit. Let's bring back the fun. Wink

Monte

 


 
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Monte Miller
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« Reply #38 on: December 27, 2011, 06:09:10 PM »

I got my 10 year old son interested in U/C flying, he is comin on well. Some of his mates have been with us this summer and I have introduced them to the sport. This vinter I´m building a few trainers that they can use next summer. I hope they will continue and build for them selfes. And I think its important that the old guys not brag on with the old days and what they did every day, the youngsters get bored about that. The computer games is here to stay, but I will try to get it exciting to fly the U/C planes also.
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R/C is disco, C/L is Rock´n´roll
montmil
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« Reply #39 on: March 18, 2012, 10:56:24 AM »

Sometimes, you may find a youngster within your family circle that shows a little interest in model aircraft. My 8-year old grandson from Austin, Texas has spent the past week with us up here in North Texas. When I can get him off the compuKer, he has learned some woodworking and building skills.

I have a couple kits stashed away for him. When his school summer break arrives, I'm going to plant some seeds and water 'em well. I remember the thrill when my plane took off. I'd like to see that same look in his eyes.

Monte
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Monte Miller
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otech66
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« Reply #40 on: August 13, 2012, 06:57:40 AM »

I agree with a lot said about the future of C/L.
I am no real youngster at 46 but am probably one of the youngest guys in our club in Tas. Our club is generally an RC club and most of the guys have been flying for 20 years or so. These guys tend to throw their nose in the air when you talk C/L and I am sure they haven,t seen what can be done with a good pilot on the handle.The real old guys (My father included) are all into their 70's and grew up with c/l, freeflight, push button rc up to the modern. I think they have forgotten how much fun it was back then. I have taken up flying c/l at a school ground close to where I live as our club has no circle and because we have had a little exposure have now a small band of 4 that regularly fly. The southern club in Tas has 2 circles mowed and we travel 2 hours to fly with them as much as we can. Their club is on a bit of a cl boom as we do more there and more people get exposed to it. A lot of their rc flyers are now building c/l models and joining in the fun. My eldest son came to me the other week and asked straight out "dad can I build a frog Talsiman" The answer was of course yes. He has started woodwork at school and wanted to try his hand at modelling after showing no previous interest. I will have a great time teaching him how to fly and hope he keeps building.
I think more exposure is the answer C/L is cheap and models are easy to build and most of all are fun.
We all need a bit of fun to keep us going
Flyer from down under.
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greggles47
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« Reply #41 on: August 13, 2012, 08:29:37 AM »

My club - Doonside MAC in Western Sydney is starting to get a junior presence.

One of our younger members (around early 40's) has a 6 year old daughter, who sometimes come along for a fly. She recently flew her first full solo flight from Take off to landing.

We also have a young bloke (about 11 years old) who blew in a couple of months ago to have a look. A number of club members have found unused models and motors for him to use, and he comes down every week models and support gear stuffed into his backpack so he can ride his scooter. Keen as mustard! He easily flies out full flights and is waiting on better weather to perfect his loops.

There's an other bloke who's just started coming along with his son. Model on the board and collecting the necessary.

SO this old club is starting to reverse the general trend of just a bunch of old blokes continuing to do what they did.

Regards

Greg
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« Reply #42 on: September 22, 2012, 01:25:47 PM »

I'm 56 years old, and at contest banquets, I STILL get seated at the kiddie table.  Must mean something.  Just saying.
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« Reply #43 on: November 05, 2012, 10:43:22 AM »

Hmm. My son's family lives well south of us, so seeng them is a rare treat.  A week ago, when they were visiting us, I asked my son if he and my 8 year old son  would like to try some control line flying. Conditions at the airfield were cold  (about 6 deg C) with a nippy wind - and there were occasional showers.  Even so, they loved it. They flew a mate's delta trainer with a MVVS 1.5cc diesel. I did a check flight with it - rock solid. By the end of his 3rd flight son was flying beautifully stably and flying the tank out. 8 year old grandson was flying solo in the centre - and lasting over a lap.

So, even in foul weather, it looks like younger generations do enjoy control line, if they get access to it. But we drove over 20 miles to the field.  It's a super place.  No noise complaints - but then again, no exposure to the public.  And even if they were interested, no local model shop selling control line gear.  I do think that electric motors with modern control gear and batteries may overcome the noise issue and make more local flying viable. But lack of local supplies could still be an obstacle.
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greggles47
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« Reply #44 on: November 06, 2012, 04:32:23 PM »

I don't think that noise is the major issue. At least with councils etc. There are certainly plenty of noise generators allowed in public places. Dirt bikes, Grass cutters, loud cars, sporting events (ever heard a dozen netball courts?)

I think it's the safety and subsequent possibility of litigation that makes most public authorities limit our activities.

An update on our juniors, Our "blow in" now has his own gear, but has recently started flying inverted on another members used combat wing. This kid is super keen and learning quickly.

They are out there waiting for exposure, not in the same numbers as when we were young, but there all the same. We are shrivelling through lack of exposure.

Good luck to all!

Greg
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« Reply #45 on: February 10, 2018, 07:27:13 PM »

Hello All,

Just came across this  old thread and found it impossible not to stick my oar in. I've seen 84 years and been modeling for most of them. My mother swore I built my first at four yrs. old from an old strawberry box.

In my opinion,  the major difficulty ( as has been said a few times above )lies in exposure. it's not the distance to a site, but rather that no one sees us fly without setting out deliberately to do so.

As far as interest by young people it's there, it needs encouragement. I talked our RC club into sponsoring a program for kids 9-14 and we had a very successful program for 5 years. I was able to introduce them to CL as part of it. The project involved the kids building everything they flew. This included takeout tray foam gliders, Delta Darts, Herr Scouts and Cubs, along with the analysis of why and how they flew (or didn't) and what to do about it.     
 
  Then on to CL, building a 1/2 A Spitfire, ground shool ,first flights on club built versions  of the "Spit" (which was a real test of the  design), and then flying their own.

The next step was a larger, more powerful .15 Norvell engined CP (for Cal Poly*) P-51 Later kitted by Eric Rule (RSM). Every one of them flew up to and sometimes beyond, loops and wing overs.     (*Cal Poly Aero Dept. graciously provided both class rooms and flying space for all but RC flying


 The final days, ending six weeks from June into July were spent on RC with buddy box training on the club's trainer.                                                                           

  The enthusiasm was such that we had most applying fer the next year in addition to the new students, to the extent that we were forced to have two classes per year after the first two years.  Unfortunately, very few continued after the end of classes. I'm convinced this was due to inaccessability of the facility to fly CL, which, here in Central CA is only abvailable mid-week for CL flying, and is away from the public eye. 

 Kids haven't changed, especially at this age (9-14). Adults have, they'd rather buy something already built and modern than have to be involved.

   Ron Burn(F4FGuy)



                                                                                                                                                       
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OZPAF
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« Reply #46 on: February 11, 2018, 04:11:15 AM »

Quote
Kids haven't changed, especially at this age (9-14). Adults have, they'd rather buy something already built and modern than have to be involved.

I think this is a very valid point Ron.

Parental or family mentor support during this age bracket would go a long way to increasing involvement. In a programme of providing free Buddy box Rc flight training over 5 years for up to 12 yr olds, drop off in attendance was mainly due to lack of support by the parents. Too difficult for the parents to even provide transport( not more than 30mins), one Sunday a month for 3 hrs flying.

John
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