Hip Pocket Builders' Forum

Outdoor Free Flight Forum => Peanut Scale => Topic started by: bcarter1234 on August 30, 2015, 02:58:54 PM



Title: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on August 30, 2015, 02:58:54 PM
I wanted to start another Peanut, wanted a twin engine model and wanted an He 111 so here we are. It won't end up very scale as I hope to get two 3" props on it so the nacelles will end up too far from the fuselage. The wing will also be a much thinner in section as I prefer airplanes I can coax into flying. At least I'll know what it is supposed to be when it flies over.

Would it fly with 2" props? I haven't started the wing so I'm willing to go scale if anyone has a twin flying on props that size. If I'm not too lazy I could even build a second wing and try it. That wouldn't be too bad as long as I just hang the props and motors leaving the nacelles until I see if it has potential.     

Formers from 3mm depron sanded on one side to 2mm thickness to get rid of one "heavy" skin.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150829_144028_zpsfxoe6tmt.jpg)

Formers laid out on 3 view. Formers 2, 3 and 4 positioned to attach to leading edge, spar and trailing edge respectively.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150829_144302_zpsniry2983.jpg)

Same jig used for 36" Constellation. I think the larger fuse was easier to build. I used the cut top of the fuselage drawing to line up the formers.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150829_182013_zpsragm2fwe.jpg) 

Formers temporarily (I hope *) attached to jig with hairpins and double side sticky tape.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150829_182022_zpsiky1jcpy.jpg)

Top bottom and center stringer attached.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150829_213008_zpsq2sbwpb0.jpg)

All stringers are 1mm (.040") x 1mm (.040") tapering to 1mm (.040") x .6mm (.025"). The consistent 1mm dimension stands up from the former. I'll sand them to a taper on the rear half of the fuselage to yield a double taper after all are installed. This should keep the tail light and let me compensate for my seeming inevitable flaws in the formers.  I glued them in place with foam safe thick CA then wetted them near the extreme bend at the front to relieve some of the stress.

All 9-1/2" of fuselage.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150830_140937_zpsnd4g9nb0.jpg)

From the front.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150830_141000_zpsbavbhjgz.jpg)

I used 14 pound per cubic foot balsa for the stringers. Using 8 pound would have let me increase the stringer size to 1.3mm (.051") square tapering to 1.3mm (.051") x .8mm (.031")  at the same overall weight. Any opinions on larger softer verses smaller stiffer for stingers?

*Now to see if it is in fact temporarily attached to the jig.



Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: TimWescott on August 30, 2015, 06:44:13 PM
Since you've got Depron lying around, why not make a flat-plate model of the model?  Just whack out wings and tail feathers from 2mm Depron per your plan, with balsa sticks for a fuselage and for the nacells.  Glue it all up with foam-safe CA.  Then try it with 2" props and see if it'll stay in the air.

One way or another you'll learn what you need to know (I suspect you'll learn that you need 3" props -- but that's why you do the experiment).


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on August 30, 2015, 07:05:10 PM
Tim,

Thanks for the suggestion. I'll cut some pieces out and see what happens. I already know carving the fuselage out of pink foam could have been done in about 20% of the time it's taken to build this one up.  ;)


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on August 30, 2015, 09:07:24 PM
It came out of the jig without too much trouble. Here it is back in the jig before I realized I had lined up the bottom of the fuselage with the lines intended for the top. Doh!
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150830_162919_zpsgm2l8mid.jpg) so it is a method I would be willing to use again.

Fuselage as shown is 1.2 grams. Drawing shows the scale engine locations and those necessary to allow for something near a 3" diameter prop. Looking closer you can see the lines drawn to show the modified leading resulting from moving the nacelles outboard by 1/2". Since I only build and fly for fun I think I'll be able to live with the planform change. I'm still undecided as well about how to modify the nacelles themselves to allow for a decent length motor. Maybe I should just go electric and solve both problems in one fell swoop. Do we have in house expertise to recommend motors and props?   
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150830_203655_zpsm4ekmmbl.jpg)

Too late now but I keep thinking about Emmanuel Fillon's twin wire drive. Anyone have any experience with one? That might be the thing to put on a box fuselage, sheet flying surface depron model.
 


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on August 31, 2015, 09:11:17 PM
Wing tips and tail surface outlines heat formed ala Paul Bradley with a soldering iron from 1.2mm (1/16") square stock. They will be sanded to final thickness after ribs are added.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150831_210316_zpszlkk0123.jpg)



Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: rgroener on September 04, 2015, 01:51:04 AM
A He-111 in peanut size :o You are brave ;D
Looking forward to see it being built. Will there be enough space in this tiny nacelles?

Roman


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on September 04, 2015, 10:02:38 AM
Roman,

We'll see. It's likely I'll leave the nacelles open to run the motors to the trailing edge. This project will be much more in the "semi-scale" range at least until I can determine how flyable it is. I was discussing this with Don McLellan, as another issue is that the prop shafts appear to be in line vertically with the wing leading edge. The nacelles will need some "artistic license" to say the least. I'll be using a much thinner flat bottom section so having the bulk of the nacelles and motors under the wing may still look okay.

I am still considering two wings just to see if fat 3 bladed props might be able to fly it with the nacelles at or near scale location. The scale location would allow two 2" diameter props. These provide the same prop disc as one 2.83" prop and likely less efficiency. That's a ratio of less than 22% prop diameter to span.

Here are the numbers for other possible locations.
Move nacelles out 1/4" each.
Two 2.5" diameter props same prop disc as one 3.53" prop. 27% prop diameter to span.
Move nacelles out 1/2" each. (My current proposal. The Pistachio Spitfire pulls well with a 3" diameter 3 blade yogurt pot prop and I have Peanuts that fly on 4" props.)
Two 3" diameter props same prop disc as one 4.24" prop. 32% prop diameter to span.

It's a Peanut so either way it should be fun.   


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on September 07, 2015, 03:53:30 PM
Here are some progress shots from this weekends work.
I built the center section flat.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150906_134704_zps4kztt1op.jpg)

Early work on the outboard sections.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150906_161514_zps10mbteei.jpg)

Before sanding and joining. There will be .625" dihedral at each tip. Wing weighs 1.2 grams.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150906_175150_zps8za4yh2g.jpg)

View from one tip. After joining the sections I'll add one turbulator strip between the spar and the leading edge.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150906_175159_zpsakbxhghm.jpg)

The early mock up. Horizontal and vertical stabilizer together come in at 0.3 grams.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150907_143532_zpsircpj6ut.jpg)

I plan to install the wing so the bottom will be up .250" from the bottom of the fuselage. This will give the top of the wing, the tips and the nacelles the correct relationship to the fuselage since I'm using a a wing section that is .250" thinner than scale at the center. I've effectively built only the top half of the wing. ;) At least I'll know for the next plane I build whether the location of the top or bottom of the wing is more critical to appearance. 



Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: rgroener on September 08, 2015, 01:59:01 AM
bcarter1234, thanks for your explanation. I am looking forward to see how you will solve the problems.
Your weekend work looks very nice. I like the construction.
Keep on the good progress.

Roman


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on September 27, 2015, 02:10:18 PM
I've made some progress fitting the wing. Here is the chunk that was cut out. You can also see the two small strips added to attach the leading and trailing edge. The middle former will attach to the spar.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150925_182151_zpsse7nz1jv.jpg)

Close up from the bottom. I hope to reuse the cut out section fitting new partial formers at the leading and trailing edges. 
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150925_182302_zpsqrftyd4a.jpg)

Wing fitted.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150925_182422_zpsvk5ngyhc.jpg)


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on September 27, 2015, 04:53:37 PM
The tail surfaces are now fitted. Current weight as shown is 2.7 grams.

It's time to carve a plug and try pulling the nose section. I still have to commit to a nacelle design too. This probably would have been easier at double the span but I do love to see a Peanut do its thing. ;)
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150927_164338_zps9xtxhrss.jpg) 
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150927_164354_zpslqkw22yx.jpg)
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150927_164403_zpsssp07we6.jpg)


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: OZPAF on September 27, 2015, 08:24:05 PM
Its looking impressive. Lots of wing area! You wouldn't consider using motor sticks inside your nacelles? That would possibly simplify your nacelles - they wouldn't need to be as strong.

It will be interesting to see how it flies.

John


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Don McLellan on September 27, 2015, 10:51:21 PM
Very, very impressive!!  Truly looking forward to more pics and progress reports.

Don


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: SBlanchard on September 28, 2015, 09:20:03 AM
What a great subject and a great build. I hope this turns out the way you want. I'm looking forward to the finished model and the flight reports. I'm curious, is this intended for FAC competition? I ask because the Depron formers would exclude it from FAC. I thought I'd mention if that was your intention. Just as a heads-up.

Steve


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on September 28, 2015, 11:05:36 AM
Thanks for the comments. My current inclination it to go with an open nacelle with the hook on the trailing edge. Their would be plenty of strength that way if I can live with the looks.

As with all my planes it's only to be flown for my own pleasure, I don't compete, so the depron is a bonus not a problem. Thanks for the heads up though, it could matter to someone.

I do find it humorous that there are materials restrictions on something as esoteric as free flight scale planes. Using whatever material comes to hand seems to me to be absolutely in the spirit of building your own stuff. We use various hard to source woods, papers, metal alloys, plastics, carbon fiber, purpose made rubber, chemicals of all sorts but restrict the use of the material that throw away food containers and building insulation are made from. If the old timers didn't use it "back in the day" it was because they didn't have access to it. In some applications foam is better, I'm not a purist. If Aerogel or carbon nanotubes would build a better free flight plane, were cheap and readily available, I'd use them. ;)       


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on September 29, 2015, 09:17:37 PM
I'd never plunge molded anything before, the He 111 nose seemed a perfect opportunity to further my education.
This is the plug for the He 111's asymmetric nose, carved from balsa.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150929_201607_zpsjyyd1cqx.jpg)
The view from the back, plunged after heating the plastic with a heat gun.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150929_201530_zpss3ax6yud.jpg)
Same setup from the front.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150929_201459_zpsfuhtmrxt.jpg)
With the plug removed.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150929_201628_zpsgob9zgjs.jpg)
Test fitted, you can see the plug and a spare in the background. Anyone need one? ;) It only takes about one minute now that I have the mold.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150929_203553_zpsnto7mzaw.jpg)
It should look okay once its framed.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150929_205350_zpsnocghdod.jpg)
A top view showing the asymmetry.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20150929_205423_zpsrqpfpg5k.jpg)
Oh! Sorry for the gratuitous hairy leg shot. I didn't notice until I scrolled down and I'm too lazy to crop it.

I was pleasantly surprised at how simple the process was once I got the plastic hot enough. The mold went in with very little effort. My first frame had too much clearance around the plug. This one one has about .060" -.090" all around. .060" would have been enough.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: OZPAF on September 30, 2015, 03:35:09 AM
You made that look painless! What type and thickness plastic did you use?

John


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on September 30, 2015, 08:55:58 AM
John,

Sorry I don't know what type of plastic it is. It is "found" material from a clear plastic box similar to the one pictured here. I heated it to the point that the air from the heat gun was starting to blow it into a dome and then plunged the mold into it.
(http://www.jewellery-world.co.uk/AdminImages/Products/jworld_1/62688_big.jpg)
It measured .014" before molding. I thought it would be too thick but the finished piece is of course much thinner. I don't think I'd want it much thinner being on the nose as it will. It weighs .28 grams.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Don McLellan on September 30, 2015, 11:40:57 AM
Very, very nice Brent.  The nose looks like it fits perfectly on the fuse.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: OZPAF on September 30, 2015, 07:47:19 PM
Thanks BC.

John


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 04, 2015, 02:57:35 PM
I'd be embarrassed if I tallied the number of hours spent ciphering and fabricating to get to this point. Never having built a nacelle before perhaps a scratch built Peanut He 111 from a 3 view was not an ideal primer. I don't believe there is a Pistachio He 111 in my future but if there is it will be built from foam. At any rate here is the current state from various angles.

The rings are of .060"/1.5mm depron sanded down from 2mm sheet to get rid of the "heavy" skin. The black streaks are carbon tow attached with foam safe CA.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151004_075848_zpsh5wkdjki.jpg)
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151004_075648_zpssnyaysxc.jpg)
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151004_075624_zps47ldb7dg.jpg)

I tried to maximize the clearance for the motors. The inside diameter of the rings is 0.60"/15mm.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151004_075722_zpsvgu2atzb.jpg)

The firewalls are made, bored for the nose blocks and will be installed next. Still unsure about where and how the rear motor anchor will be done. A hook on the trailing edge will be easiest and provide the greatest capacity at a whopping 3" hook to peg length but result in a partially exposed motor.

Currently pondering using 3 bladed yogurt pot props with comparatively fat blades and high pitch in hopes of getting a decent length of motor run. Does anyone know if a twin will accept higher than normal pitch since each prop need only provide half the thrust? The analogy in my mind is that one tractor couldn't pull a wagon from a dead stop in high gear. Two tractors on the other hand might be able to. The question comes down to whether or not a high pitch prop at low rpm can produce effective thrust.

Thanks for any thoughts, especially those based on experience or observation.     
 


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 05, 2015, 09:38:14 AM
The front half of the nacelles are made from light 1/32" sheet. Likely the back half will be from insulation foam. Each of the sheet pieces came out at about .2 grams. Weight as shown so is 3.9 gr. The wing and nacelles contribute 2.6 grams of the total.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151004_213856_zpsadlmzgbs.jpg)
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151004_215411_zpsmbihe1pb.jpg)


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: OZPAF on October 05, 2015, 07:08:20 PM
Neat.
John


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 07, 2015, 09:14:29 AM
These are the rough blanks for the nose plugs. Front to back they are two layers of 1/16" balsa, one of 1/64" ply and two more of 3/32" balsa. 
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151006_204532_zpsjm2bzj7s.jpg)

One installed in the nacelle and the back side of the other after turning on a dremel.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151006_211658_zpsdqxns92s.jpg)

The nacelles can still be slid on and off at this point. They are three degrees down in relation to the wing to bring them parallel to the fuselage. The nose plugs angle down three degrees beyond that to provide down thrust. The alignment was surprisingly easy. Hopefully I can use some of these lessons on the 36" Constellation. 4.5 grams as shown. Breakdown is 1.6 grams in the two nacelles, 1.6 grams in the wing and 1.3 in the fuselage and stabilizers.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151006_221016_zpslymtzxiz.jpg)
Still need to make up the spinner/propeller assemblies and install the prop shaft tubes. Not sure whether to bother with a freewheeler. 


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Don McLellan on October 07, 2015, 12:03:55 PM
Fantastic!  A very neat way to do the nacelles and very impressive weight for so much structure.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Sky9pilot on October 07, 2015, 01:43:42 PM
Ditto what Don said...this is really an intriguing model.  Love the plunge molded nose and the nacelles are top notch!  The Connie will benefit lots from this build.
Sky9pilot


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 07, 2015, 02:46:52 PM
Don and Tom,

Thanks for the comments. This little plane should make doing the similar operations on the Connie seem a bit easier by comparison. I preferred to make my mistakes on something I didn't have as much time in.

I love to look at and watch Peanuts fly but this would have been much less fiddly at double the span. There are two things that appeal to me about Peanuts outside of the building aspect. They look like they shouldn't perform as well as they do so you get a little bit of magic from that and the flights look more "epic" in a given area due in part to the smaller scale.   

I will say I'm liking the results of using smaller sections of heavier stock. The overall weight seems to stay reasonably low but it doesn't feel delicate when you handle it the way soft balsa often does. We'll see if I take it all back when it comes time to cover. It was very tempting to do the nacelles from sticks but the sheet was easy, smooth, strong and not much if any heavier than using sticks. It's amazing how much I resent even a tenth of a gram at this scale. On the plus side it makes me watch my weight on the larger planes too.

It's strictly a taste thing but seeing planes fly in the fashion Dave Rees' planes flew still awes me. One of my other favorite videos is the one of David Aronstein's Tupolev ANT-25. It just looks impossible that they stay in the air at those speeds. 


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 12, 2015, 09:32:18 AM
Made up a small jig to shape the top rear section of the nacelles.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151011_144818_zps56fdn7u6.jpg)

After sanding to shape.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151011_151816_zpsm7uotjzo.jpg)

Sitting in place.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151011_152636_zpspbylrg8i.jpg)

For the the much larger lower rear nacelle I'm going to try turning them from foam using a dremel. The extra fairing which the covers the landing gear will be shaped and glued to the turned part, then the hollowed out as a single unit. 
 


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 13, 2015, 09:50:32 AM
Turning these foam blanks on a dremel wasn't so bad once watching them fly across the shop several times convinced me that gluing the blanks to a 1/32" ply faceplate would not work. I twisted an 1/8" drill bit about an 1-1/2" into the 2" blank. This leaves a very loose fit so I took some thin slivers of depron and pushed them in around the base of the bit to snug it up. Alignment isn't critical as turning them will true them up automatically. The whole operation takes less than 5 minutes per nacelle. No glue was used and they come off the bit easily when you are done.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151012_205207_zpsy7kkxzj6.jpg) 

I think you could put a split blank around a larger mandrel and using a drill press or lathe turn a hollow foam fuselage this way. You just need to pick a subject that has a symmetrical round section fuselage. ;)   

Here they are fitted to the wing. A section was sliced off and then the rough cut surface is sanded to flatness by running them over a piece of sandpaper stuck to the table.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151012_213323_zps20gmostv.jpg)

Next I need to form the fairings that go over the landing gear and the prominent scoops on the bottom. 

The plan is to cover the wing, trim tissue away, add the nacelles and then finish the covering. All my plans are subject to change.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 13, 2015, 09:35:34 PM
I couldn't see my way from the shape of the rear nacelle halves as shown above to where I hoped to go so it was time for another try.
It started with turning this on the dremel.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_204718_zps1aylxz7j.jpg)
The sides were sanded to match the plan view of the earlier attempt.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_205254_zpsyhy6jwa3.jpg)
Here is the current state.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_212204_zpsn1l3zq1t.jpg)
It should be possible to use these to hold the rear motor pegs.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_212321_zpsoeumfwbo.jpg)
One down one to go.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_212359_zpspbrtdygn.jpg)


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Don McLellan on October 13, 2015, 09:52:13 PM
Hi Brent,

When you turn the parts with your dremel, do you use sand paper?  If so what grit etc?

Don


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 14, 2015, 09:45:46 AM
Don,

I use 80 grit to get me close and then 120 or 150 to get down to the final dimensions. 240 will put a nice smooth surface on them. Use very little pressure on the paper. I don't even have my hand directly behind it, I just push a piece of folded paper up against it and that is sufficient pressure to do the job. 

This plug started at 1.375" x 1.375" x 2.5". I twisted the 1/8" drill bit in by hand but you could probably do it with a drill at low rpm. To snug the fit for turning I spiral wrapped a piece of masking tape to the bit and reinserted it. The turning would probably be even easier on a drill press as the lowest speed of my antique dremel is still pretty fast. 


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Don McLellan on October 14, 2015, 11:54:08 AM
Thanks Brent.  I have the same problem with my dremel.  It is either 'off', or 'warp 2' speed.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Prosper on October 14, 2015, 01:21:37 PM
Very daring and admirable stuff Brent, kudos. Normally I can't follow threads with imbedded pictures, my internet speed won't allow the page to load, but occasionally I can get a look in!

Stephen.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 14, 2015, 05:31:23 PM
Stephen,

Thanks for the kind words. My efforts appear as impressionism to your photorealism. ;) But you keep me inspired. 


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 16, 2015, 09:25:11 AM
The foam piece for the second nacelle is now made.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151013_212321_zpsoeumfwbo.jpg)
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151014_203449_zpsdtr7rtfe.jpg)

I have two options for the rear peg location.
1) 3" of hook to peg with a conventional small aluminum tube for the peg. The room at the back will be pretty tight. 
2) 2-1/2" hook to peg using a bobbin and trying the "wobbly peg".

Any thoughts on which is likely to give the best motor run? Keep in mind these will be 3" props.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 20, 2015, 09:23:43 AM
The motor peg mounts are installed, I went with 2-1/2" peg to hook and room for bobbins. I used foam safe CA to glue some small 1/32" balsa reinforcements inside the foam nacelles and drilled for the 1/16" aluminum tubing to pass through. As is my practice a drop of CA was then applied to each piece of balsa to harden it. On the fourth one a much larger drop went on, ran onto the foam and ate through it. So much for foam safe. The damaged area was cut out to square edges and a new piece of foam was glued in its place and shaped. No harm just a good half hour wasted for taking the shortcut of putting the glue on from the bottle.

Current state. Fuselage covered wet in 2 pieces using gluestick.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151020_090859_zpsykfldoj3.jpg)

Wings covered dry with gluestick, four pieces so far, many more to come. No shrinking yet.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151020_090923_zpssfk6lbcu.jpg)
 


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Sky9pilot on October 20, 2015, 05:00:32 PM
Brent...looking good.  Sorry to hear about the foam, but you'll have that handled easily with your skills!
Sky9pilot


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: bcarter1234 on October 27, 2015, 08:57:26 AM
Some progress has been made since the last post. Here is a closeup of the nacelle. The foam bulges out slightly as it goes over the side of the balsa.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151024_094741_zpsdqjxczbj.jpg)

The solution was to trim a small rectangle of the foam away so it could blend into the balsa without the bulge. You can also see the patch from the glue damage referred to in an earlier post.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151024_095015_zpsefw3sht6.jpg)

Foam piece ready to install.
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151024_094643_zpsuvhsuou6.jpg)

6.5 grams as shown. I'm hoping to stay under 10 grams flying weight without rubber. This should work well with approximately 30 square inches of wing area. 
(http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s307/bcarter1234/20151027_082637_zpsfvcbjoax.jpg)

The top foam parts are not glued on yet. I still need to put tissue on the four foam parts, shrink the wing covering and then tissue the gaps including wing fillets. The tissue on the tail was preshrunk without a frame twice, ironed and then applied. I'll probably mist it and see if the frames can handle the remaining shrinkage.

The spinners are about half complete, still need to notch for the prop blades and bend the wires.


Title: Re: Heinkel He 111 (or any Peanut twin)
Post by: Wout Moerman on December 09, 2015, 02:44:15 AM
Wow, nice project!

You asked about the pitch for twin props. The p/d can indeed be higher. The area of the combined prop disks is 40% bigger than a single prop. The p/d can than also be up to 40% bigger. Or in simple terms: use the same pitch as on a 40% bigger prop.