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 1 
 on: Today at 04:44:17 PM 
Started by LASTWOODSMAN - Last post by LASTWOODSMAN
TIGER MOTH  17.5 INCH    LASER CUT   DUMAS KIT 208   SCALE   1:20

FUSE TAIL END

Pic #1     5642     The doublers are ready to glue as they sit ...  beveled edge on the left,  and facing down.      

Pic #2     5644     All glued up - excess to be cut off later.

Pic #3     5645     The wobbly tail post doubler strip,  is glued in.

RIGHT CABANE STRUT

Pic #4     5647     The Cabane struts'  cross brace (1/16" sq strip of balsa) is glued exactly over, and lining up with,   the Side Fuse Frame  longeron (also  1/16" sq),  that it sits on.

Pic #5     5646     Under the eraser are the only places of balsa contact with the side only,  of the fuse side frame.

Pic #6     4648     And there is the fuse so far,  out of the jig.  The gluing faces of the Cabane Strut and fuse side,  look to  have come out OK.   There is not a lot of balsa to glue the Cabane strut and fuse together with.    But the next step,  is to add the two side stringers,  the bottom one of which,  fits right up,  and under,  and up against,  the legs of the cabane strut,  for the anti-gravity,  and crash impact support needed.   You can see the strut crossbrace glued,   as exactly as I could get it,  to the side of the fuse longeron,  and in line with that longeron.   

LASTWOODSMAN
Richard

 2 
 on: Today at 04:03:06 PM 
Started by mick66 - Last post by Squirrelnet
Superb finishing job Mike. I really like the detail of adding something to the wing to represent the corrugation on the ailerons. Next time build a model with that kind of surface I'll use that technique. Shame I've already covered the Cessna I'm building Undecided

 3 
 on: Today at 03:40:33 PM 
Started by mick66 - Last post by mick66
 Hi

Getting there on the decoration.  Quite pleased with weathering and colour modulation so far.  Only plu 3G.  Will add panel lines and chips plus tidy up a spot or two later.

Just need to sort canopy, propulsion and get it to fly.  So not much really  Grin

Mike


 4 
 on: Today at 03:37:01 PM 
Started by Squirrelnet - Last post by Squirrelnet
That's great Gary... I feel a formation ff flight coming on some time soon ....

 5 
 on: Today at 03:09:31 PM 
Started by Squirrelnet - Last post by kkphantom
I just scored a Luscombe Silvaire kit so when it arrives I'll complete the trio.
Gary

 6 
 on: Today at 02:51:06 PM 
Started by Pete Fardell - Last post by Kevin M
Quote
I'm going to have to build one.

Please do!

 7 
 on: Today at 02:14:51 PM 
Started by Pete Fardell - Last post by TheLurker
Quote from: Pete Fardell
..cleaned up Veloz plan... Reckon most of us have looked at doing that one at some point.
Posted. Will appear whenever Ratz has had time to check it over.  The cleaned up version was based on the scan of the original magazine plan posted in the gallery by Gravitywell OTP

I'm going to have to build one. Seems it was silver doped overall and I have a weakness for shiny aeroplanes.  My shiny thing!  On a less appealing note it seems the original was grounded permanently after a long series of modifications failed to make it safe to fly. 

 8 
 on: Today at 02:12:22 PM 
Started by Flyguy - Last post by ironchefmpls
I am using a Rees Scalewinder that I got back in 1996. Apologies for the misspelling in the graphic. It works well for up to P-30 sized planes.

 9 
 on: Today at 01:19:58 PM 
Started by Flyguy - Last post by dosco
Pretty neat. Are you using a Rees Scalewinder?

Flyguy, any flights and/or videos to complement our man in Minnesota?

Cheers-
Dave


 10 
 on: Today at 12:16:42 PM 
Started by Flyguy - Last post by ironchefmpls
Yes, it's been a lot of fun. I went flying this morning. The wind was at 0 mph with gusts up to 5 mph, so flying conditions were pretty good. The dewpoint is 70F today, so it's pretty uncomfortable out there, even at the crack of dawn. The P1B-1 is flying pretty well. I worked my way up to 650 winds. I was afraid that without a good way to add downthrust, the power-stall would be out of control with the initial burst. This was starting to play out, but not too bad. If anyone has any ideas on how to adjust the thrust on this model, I would be interested in hearing them.

The Montreal stop prop was ok, but there was an instance where it completely fell off, mid-flight. I had to split my brain into 2 compartments as I steered the now tail-heavy plane back to safety and kept the prop in view. I'm not sure what happened, as the stop pin was right where it is supposed to be, protruding about 3/32". I'll give the whole works a shot of tri-flo (bike lube) and see how that goes. I look forward to finishing the Moth, where I can control the thrust and prop mechanism.

Here are some photos...

 11 
 on: Today at 12:00:17 PM 
Started by crashcaley - Last post by Don McLellan
Great video and beautiful flights Bernard!!

 12 
 on: Today at 10:53:26 AM 
Started by crashcaley - Last post by PB_guy
Both thumbs up Bernard!
ian

 13 
 on: Today at 10:37:08 AM 
Started by charlieman - Last post by charlieman
Here's link to rejuivinated discussion over on RC Groups: https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?2729496-Martin-Baker-MB-3-and-MB-5

 14 
 on: Today at 10:22:08 AM 
Started by charlieman - Last post by charlieman
I went back to the photos in the Aeromodeller article and remembered why I ejected them, years ago. I see that Prosper has kindly re-posted one of those views, at much better  resolution, so the point made is much clearer, now. One can appreciate in the cockpit close-up(side panels removed) that the former at the rear of the cowl (firewall?) has a slight curve, at side, as does  former at cockpit. These sections definitely not "flat sided", as indicated by Aeromodeller.

Can we reject the info in the crude, but dimensioned drawing, because we don't like the way the renderer shows his fuselage sections and airfoil?? Has anyone got the second part of the 2 part MB-5 magazine articles, from which those sketches came???

I can't say ALL the MAP series of drawings were/are suspect just because  some/many are blatantly bad. IIRC G.A.G. Cox did a terrible Spit Mk XI drawing but judge his Beechcraft Model 17 "Stagger wing" to be the best treatment of that particular American classic. Infamous William Wylam produced any number of inventive works but did manage a few stellar efforts when/if he had good data. 


 15 
 on: Today at 08:19:45 AM 
Started by crashcaley - Last post by BG
My newest creations is this video:  https://youtu.be/bskYSFz3vhc I have been working on learning the basics of video editing over the last few days. I think I might be getting there. Enjoy.
Bernard



 16 
 on: Today at 08:12:30 AM 
Started by Fergy - Last post by flydean1
Fergy,

Dick's "birdcage" wing featured stick diagonals behind a full depth main spar, and full depth riblets forward.  You have modified this and might possibly be an improvement.  He used this construction all the way up to a 1000 sq. in. monster!  All flew well.

I built a 1/2A Bounty Hunter a few years ago and was impressed with the light weight and stiffness.

 17 
 on: Today at 08:07:31 AM 
Started by simpleflyer - Last post by sx976
Hi John

I always file my data sheets, so it was easy to check. I had set it up as 3 degrees forward sweep from the front of the outer guide loop to the centre of the fuselage tether loop.  I had not calculated  the angle from the front of the outer guide loop to the CG at the wing root as you show. You were very close, it is 8.6 degrees! If you took it to the CG at the fuselage centre line, it would be 7 degrees.

Chris P

PS - I have discovered the down side of Whip Control - Tennis Elbow!!!

 18 
 on: Today at 07:40:33 AM 
Started by TheDope - Last post by billdennis747
I recall the Fernado Ramos arguments from a previous HPA discussion a few yrs back. I think Tom Arnold made a more detailed telling of his aerial experiment, but I'd like to know more. . .was the test pendulum exactly at the CG, was there turbulence. . .something must have been up, because it seems he didn't 'prove' anything at all. Sorry if Mr. Ramos is a saintly figure in modelling or his findings have become sacred over time and all that, but there it is.
No, he isn't 'a saintly figure in aeromodelling' but he has been building scale models since the 1960s, including many pendulum-equipped models which work for him, and others.

 19 
 on: Today at 05:55:46 AM 
Started by TheDope - Last post by Prosper
Thanks for the clarification John. I don't intend to go far with optimising (or trying to anyway) the external factors, because I'm almost exclusively a scale modeller so don't have the freedom of choice where wing shape or aileron shape are concerned.

Bill, thanks for the comments. I recall the Fernado Ramos arguments from a previous HPA discussion a few yrs back. I think Tom Arnold made a more detailed telling of his aerial experiment, but I'd like to know more. . .was the test pendulum exactly at the CG, was there turbulence. . .something must have been up, because it seems he didn't 'prove' anything at all. Sorry if Mr. Ramos is a saintly figure in modelling or his findings have become sacred over time and all that, but there it is.

And yes I can't provide a scientifically rigorous explanation of what's going on, but try this, it works for me:

People talk of a pendulum swinging one way or the other to effect a correction - but ditch that and think of the pendulum not moving. Imagine it's hanging straight down towards New Zealand (if the model is flying straight) or is inclined by a small angle dictated by the model's curved path, if the model is in a balanced turn. Inclined, but unmoving, that is. Now imagine that there is no slop or play whatever in the links between the pendulum and the ailerons. None at all (this isn't quite true in reality, but it's very close to being true). Now imagine an almost complete absence of friction in the same links. So when the model is caused to roll around the unmoving pendulum, by a gust, the ailerons are deflecting even as the roll starts. Any lag is down to friction, and we're satisfied that that's really small. So the counter-roll aileron is being fed in even as the roll gets going.

Stephen. PS amazing Gladiator - one for the annals. I thought it was much bigger too. Great artistry.

 20 
 on: Today at 05:37:22 AM 
Started by Pete Fardell - Last post by Prosper
Very well said Mick66. With the ribs all the same and the rib templates already existing and the fresh experience of having built the first wing/s, it should be a quick job with a better outcome. A hard trailing edge can be sanded thin at the back for a better look. Use the kettle to make a cupper tea before you start.

Stephen.

 21 
 on: Today at 05:31:26 AM 
Started by charlieman - Last post by Prosper
Quote from: DHnut
. . .as you all say the Aeromodeller drawing is a good one.
I'm afraid you'll have to "include me out" there Ricky. I can't remember the drawing. I'm highly sceptical of all Aeromodeller drawings though. Two I can immediately bring to mind (oops - that's up to three already): Fairey Battle - dreadful. Leopard Moth - ridiculous. Chilton DW1 - comically bad. There's absolutely no attempt at fidelity in any of 'em.

Stephen.

 22 
 on: Today at 04:58:18 AM 
Started by Fergy - Last post by Fergy
Thanks for your reply Dosco,

Yes I tried a few of the Drela airfoils some years ago , AG03, AG04 and AG16, but as I haven’t flown in a competition for nearly 60 years so have no simple way of comparing any of them. They did all seem to work well enough though.

The sections I settled on for the last several years were MH42 for thermal flying and E374 for slope soaring and aerobatic biplanes.

Flying on my own means that I just want the glider to hang around up there for a reasonable length of time looking for any thermals or wave lift. Raptors and gulls are very common around here and have been my main aid to finding lift, but the big breakthrough for me has been fitting a variometer. I can’t recommend this enough. All full size glider pilots will use them…..a lot.

Curiosity made me want to try out Dick Mathis style airfoils. Firstly, I wanted a change of construction method, and then I wondered how well they would perform, which seems to be as well as any other airfoil. I now believe that thickness is the most important variable, as good penetration can be useful.

The wing in the photos has only three solid ribs in each wing half. At the centre section, the tip and at the root of where the ailerons start from. The rest uses identical sticks and riblets. It gives a very stiff warp resistant and lightweight wing. I suppose if it hadn’t been a good airfoil Dick Mathis wouldn’t have stuck with it, or won any competitions.

My next job is to slim down the fuselage a lot.

 23 
 on: Today at 04:52:15 AM 
Started by kaintuck - Last post by Invader3
Nice job!
Could you post more info on the RC setup you've used?   I'm interested in progressing towards small RC models from FF, and it would be very helpful to get some info on a "real life" setup.
Many thanks,

John

 24 
 on: Today at 02:24:52 AM 
Started by dputt7 - Last post by OZPAF
Another interesting build Dave - I've always been amazed  by your speed!

John

 25 
 on: Today at 01:32:05 AM 
Started by simpleflyer - Last post by OZPAF
Neat Chris. I checked out the angle between the tether point and the CG at the wing root on CAD and came up with 8 deg which was where I was expecting it to be.

Have fun.

John

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