Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin  |  Contact Global Moderator
November 18, 2019, 06:06:01 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: 1 ... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 [16] 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ... 55   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Show Your Newest Creation  (Read 96016 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
climber
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 10
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 176




Ignore
« Reply #375 on: September 14, 2012, 01:41:25 PM »

Hi Dave!

What I do is the following:

I moved the mylar to a roll formally used to hold gift wrapping and I keep a humungeous self-healing mat out permanently at my "film cutting station."  It makes it easy to unroll and cut.  I make sure the basement is clean and vacuumed before starting as lint and dust are sucked on to the film from meters across the room by static electricity.  Having a cat (and her loose hair) doesn't help.   Fortunately, she's adorable so I am willing to cope with it.

I use No 11 x-acto blades to cut it.  I keep a super-fine grit diamond hone nearby to touch up the blade each time.  If the knife is not super-sharp it can tear the film.  If I get frustrated I plop a piece of scrap paper over the film and cut through that. 

I make sure the film is a good 4-5 cm long and wider at each edge so I can hold it.   When transferring the film to the model I work over another green cutting mat.  I lay the film down and blow on it to flatten it out.  I make sure the frame is completely dry and not tacky.   If it's tacky the temporary adhesion might be stronger than the film and you can end up tearing it.  This can be the most annoying thing so I am careful to avoid it.

I always do the bottom first.  If the surface is thin and flat like a fin or a stab I place the structure down, then the film and then clamp down the corners and edges with weights or magnets.   I use the 21st Century covering iron since I like its temperature control.  I set it to 100 degrees C. 

I go over the structure with the iron to tack it down and then carefully go over the edges to finish it off. 

When working with a curved structure I usually tack it down at one corner, tack the opposite corner while pulling on it, then do the other corners and glue down the corners that tighten the largest area.  I always apply stix-it to the ribs and spars but don't apply heat there until the very, very end. 

Corners on wings are the hardest, especially at dihedral breaks.  To deal with that I cheat.  I install a balsa fillet and then carefully sand it to a nice gentle curve.  I like to use the Permagrit sanding sticks.  I make sure the fillet is even with both the top and bottom.  Sharp corners are very hard to cover wrinkle free. 

I wrap edges all the way around to the other side and overlap it 2 mm or 3 if I can.  Leaving an edge of the film at a corner like on a trailing edge is asking for trouble. Before I do the other side I have to apply another bit of Stix-it to the edges that now have film on them.

For highly cambered bottoms and thin ribs I may apply a bead of thin CA here and there to firmly fix it just in case.  It's a bear to fix if it detaches. 

When working with film I like to pull out wrinkles by softening the Stix-it with the iron and pulling.  However, 2 um mylar doesn't like that.  If I do a corner badly I may cut out that bay, apply some Stix-it and redo it. 

To shrink I dial the iron to 200 degrees C and go over the structure, bottom first, to shrink it.  I am careful to avoid going right to the edges as it can make the Stix-it bubble.   2 um shrinks beautifully.  It adds virtually nothing to the structural strength, though, so it's best used in place where it can be reinforced or the structure doesn't need help. 

2 um aluminized is much the same except the aluminized size (the duller side) does not stick as well.  I try and apply the plastic side to the Stix-it.  It does not shrink that much so the larger wrinkles are very hard to get out. 

My greatest leap in thin mylar handling skills came when I was trying to do the same thing with Ultrafilm and OS-film for a peanut.  Wow.  After than 2 um feels like working with canvas. 

2 um mylar with tissue is quite strong.  I used it on my Gollywock and Senator wings and they are holding up wonderfully.  I also used it on my first Senator fuselage but after watching the fuse wrinkle and twist while holding a 30 gram, 12 strand motor wound to 1000 turns I got to thinking that might be its limit.  My second Senator used 5 um mylar instead. 

Hey Wout;

I cure the Future when it is completely dry.  I conducted a series of very diabolical tests to determine the most efficient method (for me) to prevent delamination and "heat curing" seemed to be the best.   And thanks!
Logged
Sky9pilot
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 50
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 2,733


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #376 on: September 14, 2012, 03:25:24 PM »

Climber,

Outstanding information...thanks for sharing Cool

Tom
Logged

Best Regards,
Sky9pilot
    "If God is your Co-pilot, consider switching seats!" 
http://www.stickandtissue.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl
http://freeflightarchive.com/index.php/homepage-2
p40qmilj
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 29
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 1,861


love that P40Q



Ignore
« Reply #377 on: September 19, 2012, 10:19:00 AM »

here are my commemoration Hurricane and Spitfire.  The Spit commemorates J G Magee author of High Flight and the Hurricane Hammy Hamilton a NB pilot killed in the Battle of Britain.
JIM
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Logged
Sky9pilot
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 50
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 2,733


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #378 on: September 19, 2012, 12:02:12 PM »

SWEET Cool

Tom
Logged

Best Regards,
Sky9pilot
    "If God is your Co-pilot, consider switching seats!" 
http://www.stickandtissue.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl
http://freeflightarchive.com/index.php/homepage-2
Dave Andreski
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 82
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 3,052




Ignore
« Reply #379 on: September 19, 2012, 12:13:16 PM »

Good goin' there Jim!
Get out and fly 'em now.
Dave
Logged

Aspire to inspire before you expire.
p40qmilj
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 29
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 1,861


love that P40Q



Ignore
« Reply #380 on: September 19, 2012, 12:51:42 PM »

 Grin  these are commissioned display models. one is for a nice old lady who is retired air force and the other is for the flight museum at Milledgeville.  two more hurricanes are destined there as well as a lysander.  i will build a hurricane for flight later on after my commissioned work is done .

jim
Logged
jym6aw6
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 378




Ignore
« Reply #381 on: September 20, 2012, 11:43:19 AM »

A fitting salute for two brave men.

Well done, Jim! Thanks for sharing  Smiley

Check your PM


jym6aw6
Logged
Pit
Palladium Member
********

Kudos: 129
Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 5,507


aka staubkorb


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #382 on: September 21, 2012, 07:07:22 AM »

Nice models Jim!

My two-years-in-the-making pistachio is ready for flight testing.  Initial hops will be outdoors (indoor venue not yet available) - maybe today.

Pete
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Logged

A Dedicated Convert to:
WWWoFF (Wonderfull Wacky World of Free Flight)

Comparing Spammers to a pile of organic waste is an insult to the organic waste!
Rewinged
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 19
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 652



Ignore
« Reply #383 on: September 21, 2012, 01:03:16 PM »

These are all models of which I am envious.  Great work!  Pete, I've become a pretty good builder--with larger sizes.  I think I can build a peanut, but I wouldn't even attempt a pistachio yet.  That looks great!  Hope you have some dead calm to see what it will do.

--Bill
Logged

Good air don't care!
Sky9pilot
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 50
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 2,733


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #384 on: September 21, 2012, 01:10:12 PM »

Great job Pete,

She's a beauty...Good luck on the trimming and flying.

Tom
Logged

Best Regards,
Sky9pilot
    "If God is your Co-pilot, consider switching seats!" 
http://www.stickandtissue.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl
http://freeflightarchive.com/index.php/homepage-2
Dave Andreski
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 82
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 3,052




Ignore
« Reply #385 on: September 21, 2012, 01:10:50 PM »

Looks good Pete!
You're pretty brave to build a Biplane as your first Pistachio.
Dave Andreski
Logged

Aspire to inspire before you expire.
BEAR
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 16
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 327



Ignore
« Reply #386 on: September 30, 2012, 11:02:35 AM »

Part way through AeroGraphics Moth Minor 24" span
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Logged

If you cant take a joke dont do free flight.
SteveSw
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 6
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 74




Ignore
« Reply #387 on: October 10, 2012, 06:00:44 PM »

Praying for snow!

Well, actually, I hate the stuff but I think it would make a nice backdrop for my latest build. It’s a Skylake Sopwith Triplane, not one of the newer laser cut kits but one of the older router cut variety.  Built pretty much stock but wanting something a bit different for my first of the building season, I decided to put her on skis.
 
I like to primarily build scale and when possible I like to emulate an actual plane. I feel it just adds to the enjoyment of the build although it can be frustrating at times.

She’s in the colors of N5486, a Tripehound sent to Russia for evaluation during WW1. From what I have read, the red stars were added over the roundels during the Russian Revolution of late 1917. Don’t think she ever saw combat but I added the MG anyway as any self respecting Sopwith should have one.  I used preshrunk tissue and dope and airbrushed on the national markings using stencils and Tamiya paints. The “N” number was printed on decal paper with the factory tailfin markings printed directly on tissue. All in all, a very easy build from a nicely thought out short kit. Backyard glide tests so far are very encouraging. Can't wait to get her to the field. Hopefully before it snows! Cheesy

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v34/SteveSw/Free%20Flight%20Models/DSC05464a.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v34/SteveSw/Free%20Flight%20Models/DSC05474a.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v34/SteveSw/Free%20Flight%20Models/sopwith-triplane-ws22p19.jpg
Show Your Newest Creation
Show Your Newest Creation
Show Your Newest Creation
Logged
crashcaley
Palladium Member
********

Kudos: 239
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 5,166


Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #388 on: October 10, 2012, 06:09:54 PM »

Steve, Wonderful work.  I hope you get a chance to get it in the air before the icky stuff starts.  Caley
Logged

What's stall speed?  Undecided
Yak 52
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 67
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 2,484


Free Flight Vagrant



Ignore
« Reply #389 on: October 10, 2012, 06:13:19 PM »

Very nice! Love the aluminium cowling: how did you do it?

Jon
Logged
FreeFlightModeller
Russ Lister
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 68
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,893


Russ Lister



Ignore
« Reply #390 on: October 10, 2012, 06:21:22 PM »

Very nice work Steve  Smiley

The DPC Sopwith Triplane is one of the many builds I have on the go ... inspired by this to get a move on!
Logged
SteveSw
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 6
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 74




Ignore
« Reply #391 on: October 10, 2012, 08:10:23 PM »

Thanks for the kind words fellas,

For side panels and or upper decking I use vellum paper (lighter than card stock and more translucent that copy paper) and then I give them a coat of water thin CA to seal and strengthen. The engine cowl is also given a coat of CA and then wet sanded with some 220 wet or dry sandpaper to help the highs meet the lows. The more times you repeat the process, the smoother it will become. For a plane such as a WW1 type, I don’t worry about a little extra weight up front for the obvious reasons. But some extra effort in sanding can keep the amount of coats and the weight to a minimum if desired.

For metal finishes, I like to airbrush on a coat of Model Master Non Buffing Metalizer Paint. In this case, Aluminum in color. It’s lacquer based, much lighter than even a thin coat of dope, and covers in one coat and blends easily so repairs disappear. It’s also a great substitute for replacing that pesky silver tissue I’ve have lost sleep over. Comes in different metallic colors if you want to make adjacent panels a bit different or you could just add a drop or two of black or white lacquer paint. One trick I use is that after the plane is complete, hold it at a arms distance and give it a really thin of Clear Krylon not trying to even get complete coverage. It will give all the different types and colors of paint the same amount of sheen, blending them together giving a much better scale and realistic looking finish.   
Logged
tross
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 44
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 714




Ignore
« Reply #392 on: October 11, 2012, 02:15:12 PM »

A very nice clean build Steve.

Are you building the cowl on a jig or form.... then installing it on the model,
or are you executing the CA/220 grit process in-place?

Tony
Logged

Instructions: Step One...Assemble the pile of sticks shown in pic "A" to look like the model airplane shown in pic "B"........
SteveSw
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 6
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 74




Ignore
« Reply #393 on: October 11, 2012, 05:18:25 PM »

Hey Tony,
The cowl is pretty much the last thing I build so that it mates up with the fuselage properly. Yes, I like to build and finish them seperate. Just easier that way. I just keep checking as I go along. I like my cowls to be removable so I can hide any balancing clay inside the fuselage also giving me better access when disaster happens and I wind up with that mangled ball of rubber in the rear. Which happens all too often.  Cheesy
Logged
flyfac
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 8
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 134



Ignore
« Reply #394 on: October 11, 2012, 10:04:56 PM »

Hopefully before it snows! Cheesy

You're set either way! 

Lovely build in a seldom seen scheme.

Scot
Logged
Marco
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 16
Offline Offline

Italy Italy

Posts: 476



Ignore
« Reply #395 on: November 25, 2012, 11:32:23 AM »

hello to everyone - it has been a while since my last build. This time I got a request from my usual customer, to have a glider. I opted for the Frog Wren, because it looked simple and, in particular, strong enough to withstand the usual kind of abuses that a 7 yrs old kid can  inflict. So, nothing really worth  a dedicated build thread. However I liked the way the plane came out. Yes, it is not really 'lightweight construction' but this made the build quite relaxing - it is the first time that I complete a model without having to repair broken stringers. It survived quite well the trimming flights, done in cooperation with my 'customer' (it did not require any real trimming, just reducing a bit the nose weight) and the first flights look good. As soon as the weather dries a bit we will try some real launch - Let's see if my customer can run fast enough to tow it....
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Re: Show Your Newest Creation
Logged
crashcaley
Palladium Member
********

Kudos: 239
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 5,166


Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #396 on: November 25, 2012, 01:26:15 PM »

Way to go Marco.  Looks like one happy youngster.  And I am sure he will be able to zoom fast to get it flying.  Caley
Logged

What's stall speed?  Undecided
dputt7
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 90
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 1,986




Ignore
« Reply #397 on: November 26, 2012, 01:21:29 AM »

Hi Marco
Looks like fun.  Grin  Whats happened to your CAT!  Roll Eyes
regards Dave
Logged
Marco
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 16
Offline Offline

Italy Italy

Posts: 476



Ignore
« Reply #398 on: November 26, 2012, 03:39:08 PM »

Caley,
your replies are always very kind.
Dave,
after having destroyed the Born Loser and the bones of MC200 the horrible beast looks satisfied, for the time being - but I know it is just a trick to get me with the guard down and strike again. I ring fenced the work place while building the Wren. Now I must find some courage to start building again the Saetta, at least the engine cowling survived. BTW, your Beaufort is great, you always choose very interesting subjects !
Logged
jym6aw6
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 378




Ignore
« Reply #399 on: November 26, 2012, 10:32:47 PM »


after having destroyed the Born Loser and the bones of MC200 the horrible beast looks satisfied, for the time being - but I know it is just a trick to get me with the guard down and strike again.


Marco, I also used to have trouble with my cat jumping up on the building table and destroying model assemblies, etc. Learned a trick to stop all that, maybe you'll find it useful.

Get some sticky tape - any kind will work - and tear off about 30 pieces, each about about 60mm long. Take one piece and bend it into a loop, connecting both ends with the sticky side out. Do the same with all the other pieces.

When you are ready to leave your work area, stick the tape loops all over the places where there is  modeling activity - on the plan, edges and corners of table....wherever the cat likes to go or lie down in your modeling space, put down a tape loop.

CATS DON'T LIKE TO WALK, SIT, OR LIE DOWN ON STICKY TAPE!  Wink. After they walk on it and it sticks to their feet or fur a few times, they will avoid the area and find a different place to go. You shouldn't have to do this more than once or twice before the cat "gets it"  Grin .

You can reuse the tape loops several times until you are sure that kitty has learned his lesson.

Hope this helps  Smiley !


Jim (6aw6)
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 [16] 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ... 55   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!