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Author Topic: Peanut Scale Propeller Size  (Read 2594 times)
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linewinder
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« on: March 06, 2012, 10:07:34 AM »


    I am curious as to what you peanut builders think is the best size for a propeller.  I have seen photos of planes with a very large paddle type prop and others with a smaller one with narrower blades and less diameter.  In flying rubber scale models in general I have found that a diameter of around the span of the stab seems to work well for starters.  But, bigger props seem to get me into a  position where the torque gets very troublesome and even with free-wheeling the big blades out front seem to act as an airbrake and can cause trouble. 
    What do you guys have to say about this ?
 
    Linewinder
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flyfac
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2012, 01:41:37 PM »


I usually fly peanuts with 6" props.  If plastic, a scraped Pecks or Tern Aero, otherwise carved balsa.  Power is usually a braided loop of 1/8, adjusted up or down as necessary.

Scot
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linewinder
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« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2012, 09:39:27 AM »


Thanks.  I will give your methods a try.  If I can go go larger props and increase performance, so much the better.  I also use a strip of 1/8, but, unbraided about one and one third hook to peg long.
Properly balanced the plane shows no strange characteristics.  The prop is still turning slowly on landing, so unwind is not competed.  I have braided motors before that had multiple strands, but,
how do you braid a single strand ?  Partially wind it before you tie it into a loop ?

   Linewinder
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Warhawk
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« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2012, 11:27:42 AM »

Linewinder,

I like to braid by winding each half of a motor in opposite directions.  This technique allows the entire motor (no matter how big) to collapse into a ball, so it will always maintain some tension in the model.  For a single loop, simply anchor the knot (I use an "E" size orthodontic rubber band to secure a short tube which will fit over the rear anchor tube), then find the opposite point and twist the loop.  It puts opposite twists in each side, and you'll see it want to ball up.  When you have enough twists, put the loop onto the prop hook, and mount the knot/tube in a pushing stick and insert into the model, making sure the thing doesn't un-twist in the process.  Once in the model, put in some winds and let it unwind to smooth out the "braiding".

BTW, braided motors don't work too well with a ramp-type freewheeler unless you put a concentric tube over tube on the prop, with the inner tube slightly longer to hold the motor tension, allowing the prop to slide back and spin without the ramp engaging.  Latch-type free wheelers work great.

Justin
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linewinder
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« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2012, 06:25:52 PM »


Justin:

   It sounds like you have this braiding method worked out well.  I will give it a shot.  Working with peanut sized rubber motors is a new experience for me and frustrating at times.

    Thermals,

     Linewinder
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Bredehoft
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« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2012, 07:24:23 PM »

If you can build your Peanuts under 10 grams, I would recommend a 5 inch prop (preferably hand-carved) and a loop of 3/32nds or even 1/16th rubber.  A 7 gram (or lighter) plane will fly well with that size prop and a loop of 1/16th rubber. 

--george
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Modelace
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« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2012, 07:30:36 PM »

I regularly use braided motors with ramp style freewheelers. A braided motor does not have to be in tension. A simple ramp, filed into a brass tube works just fine.
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Hillsboro Bob
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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2012, 05:17:23 PM »

On the subject of peanut scale props.  Has anyone had experience with putting a larger (say Peck 6" prop) on a 0.032 shaft.  The hole in the larger 6" prop is sized for a slightly larger shaft and I guess the prop could wobble.  I was wondering because I have a couple of models with glued in peck small buttons (and one adjustable button) that are made for the 0.032 sized props like the Peck 4 3/4" prop.  I would like to try a larger prop but I don't want to dismantle the nose buttons on the models.  Or alternatively, are 6" props available that fit the 0.032" shaft ?

Thanks in advance for your help..

Bob
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Bob
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2012, 08:04:42 PM »

BEST is to carve, or fan-laminate your own.  Alternative is to bush the prop, which requires CAREFULLY drilling the hub to take the bushing.

Carving your own prolly takes as much time as bushing a plastic prop, and is a LOT more fun (and educational).
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