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Author Topic: No-Cal FW-190  (Read 2394 times)
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outofbalance
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« on: January 25, 2008, 02:58:55 AM »

No-Cal Models like this FW-190
 
These models are indoor models built in two categories; the lightest you can build, or, something agreed on by the group who competes, maybe something like 7.0 grams. Most of my no-cal models come in around six to seven grams. If they’re light, you add weight (grrrr!). No one likes to add weight but if it’s a contest and seven grams is the rule then so be it.

These models are single tissue covered and built with the fuselage in profile. Just one side of the fuselage is covered as well.

The model pictured below was designed by Paul Bradley back in 1993; his web site has the plan as well as the art work. So, if you want a model to look like his, use his site.

The basic no-cal is built with a stick attached to the fuselage to keep all the flying surfaces and power in a single line. These sticks can be composed of two sticks glued together to form an ‘L’ shape in cross section, or you can roll a 1/32” balsa tube. I use the ‘L’ shape construction usually but I have rolled a tube. It takes some practice and a bit of TLC.

The models are hand launched and some seven gram models can do six minutes in a spacious facility. Mass launch contests are fun too. Everyone throws his or her model up at once and the last one down wins. I have never won.

Trimming takes practice and the front end of the models is a bit specialized, or not, depending on you goals.

I like no-cal because they are easy to build if one pays attention to detail. High wingers are easier to trim but low wing WWII models look so cool in flight, especially several of them puttering around on the way up or down.

I don’t think anyone can win much with plastic props. You have to get into balsa or soda bottle blades.
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No-Cal FW-190
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outofbalance
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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2008, 02:59:57 AM »

Here’s the front end on my FW-190. Incidentally, no-cal stand for no calories- meaning a light model with no fuselage volume, I guess.
 
This front end uses a piece of aluminum bent to allow the prop hook with prop attached to be threaded into the aluminum hanger. The hanger is glue and thread attached to the motor stick. I usually glue the hanger with a few degrees down thrust and a few degrees left thrust. Adjusting thrust is a good way for me to trim. The back of the hanger is dove-tailed cut with a jeweler’s saw to split it open and allows the prop hook (and the prop which is attached) to be removed and replaced without having to cut the prop hook off, which destroys the prop hook. There are people on the ‘net who sell these aluminum hangers but I make my own. That’s all part of the model engineering I love.

I make my prop hubs (spars) from bamboo skewers. I cut them to size, drill a center hole, then shave each end so the attached blades will be at 45 degrees for thrust. I make my blades from either balsa or soda bottle stock. I like both materials to work with, BUT, the soda bottle props are stronger.

With a seven gram model I usually use 3/32” rubber but lighter can work if you know your way around stripping rubber and figuring out how to use a torque meter. That’s on my list of things to learn about. Maybe with this technology, I can win once in a while. But, honestly, I just like to participate using my own model engineering.
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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2008, 07:14:04 PM »

hi OutOfBalance,

Thanks for the Thunderbolt and FW 190 tutorial on the No-Cals. I had seen a no-cal fly for the first time recently at an indoor meet that I attended, I went so far as to buy a 6" light prop and shaft assembly from a vendor at the event, so I believe I'm partway committed to a build. The downloads you mentioned looks like a winner for me. I'd like to try the printing on tissue at the same time.

Doug B
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Dan G.
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« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2008, 11:57:49 PM »

You know -- when I was first introduced to this idea (no-cal), I thought, "What a hick event!". But having seen it over a few years -- just practice sessions, no actual events -- I like it. I have to admit to have never made one (like many other things, I guess) but I have been quite impressed and entertained by them. The most impressive one I've seen was a P-38.

Dan G.
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Dan Garsonnin CA - Will be missed by all that knew him.
outofbalance
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« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2008, 09:47:07 AM »

Hi Blade 11 and Dan G,

The Magnificent Mountain Men of Colorado fly an indoor No Cal event with a minimum of 6.1g for the all up weight- not including motor, and a prop limit of seven inches. Their champion for Mass Launch (at the last meet) was Bill Leppard, a retired engineer from Michigan. He has a Spitfire that flies LL- (they all fly left-left). He had a six minute flight on the WWII mass launch. I've seen a Corsair, a P-40, an FW-190, an F-51, and a Japanese Judy there at the Civic Center in Colorado Springs. The next meet is in March. They also have FAC scale No Cal. I have a Waterman Gosling and a Dennis Polen Special. The Polen has never flown well but the Gosling likes it in the air!

No Cal is my favorite indoor event but I have some interest in the Australian 100 + XIII event (see Sandfly by Colin Parker). This might be fun because the weight minimum is 13 grams and the flying surfaces (stab and wing) must not be over 100 square inches. The model must ROG, therefore a landing gear is a must. All other design features are up to the builder. The boys in Victoria have some interesting designs.

The other indoor model category I'm interested in is Legal Eagle.

As we come into spring, I sometime test these models in the dead calm at dusk.

Cheers,

Outofbalance
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p40qmilj
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2008, 07:44:46 AM »

No Cal 190. I built a no cal TA 152 which worked up from as (excuse the @#@%@0) R_C plan Kiss It flies great! I could get 15 to 20 seconds inside a small gym no problem. I also mention a free source of Balsa Wood. Go to McDonalds (Canada at least) and order a big breakfast. Take careful note of the plate it is served--- light, but solid 1/16th thick foam. works great as building material for parts. Ask nicely for extra bottoms and yer in business.
JIM
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2008, 11:19:55 AM »

Hi Jim,

Do you have a photo of the TA-152 or a plan copy? Sounds interesting.

I have tried some foam plate building with thin strips. Not much luck. What glue do you use?

Rolf (OOB)
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« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2008, 06:25:11 AM »

this is my ta 152 no cal
hope this works
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« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2008, 02:07:16 PM »

Hi Jim,

Nice looking. I like the wing!

OOB
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« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2008, 08:08:07 PM »

OOB, just wanted to say thanks for your no-cal threads and the link to Paul Bradley's plans. I've never built a no-cal before but have always wanted to try one. Turns out one of the plans was for a Hellcat, my favorite WW2 fighter!

I've never attempted inkjet onto tissue before either, here's the first try. Not perfect but perfectly usable, now I'm all excited to get this done for our next indoor session!

Thanks again, Bill
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« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2008, 07:47:46 PM »

Hi Bill,

Sorry it's taken me so long to respond. I have been stuck in another set of ruts- travel and amateur radio!

The picture looks great. Have you flown the Hellcat yet?

Paul Bradley's site is so worthwhile. I had not made a no-cal either and stumbled on his site years ago. I've watched it grow. I learned to build a round thrust stick, different front ends, and the use of the computer printer to do airplane design features. Still don't know how to make my own. Also learned to use wet wood and a soldering iron to do curves.

I've downloaded the T-28; I want to try it for next winter.

Outofbalance
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