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Author Topic: No Nitro Fuel  (Read 405 times)
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Garf
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« on: April 23, 2013, 09:38:49 PM »

I know that most of the top end stunt engines will run on no nitro fuel. I know that a lot of the older american engines won't run on no nitro fuel. My question is, will the majority of newer sport/stunt engines run on no nitro fuel, like the O.S FP 35, LA 46, Brodak 40, EVO 36, etc.
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Konrad
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« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2013, 02:41:22 AM »

All glow engines will run on zero nitro and FAI 80/20 fuels.
The grand old Fox Stunt .35 ran fine on zero and low nitro fuel
Now some of the asian CL converted engine do prefer higher nitro, OS comes to mind as they seem to run best on 15%+ nitro. But they will still run and run OK on zero and low nitro fuel.
So to your question, yes the majority of newer sport/stunt engines will run on no nitro fuel.

Is there a specific engine and/or application you are thinking of?

All the best,
Konrad
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Garf
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2013, 02:29:05 PM »

My 2 Noblers have 1-Evolution 36 C/L, and 2-Brodak 40. My Tutor 2 has an LA 46.
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Garf
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« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2013, 11:29:30 PM »

I suppose I just need to mix up a batch of fuel and try the engines one by one.
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Konrad
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« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2013, 03:01:36 PM »

I suppose I just need to mix up a batch of fuel and try the engines one by one.
That is the best way to learn what makes your set up responds best.
Remember there is nothing magical about nitromethane it is really just an oxidizer. Think of it as just another variable to aid in tuning, along with chamber volume, head clearance, glow plug selection and load (prop size).

All the best,
Konrad
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perttime
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« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2013, 03:22:24 PM »

I recall that some eastern European engines designed for no/low nitro have instructions to add head shims, when using nitro.
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Konrad
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« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2013, 06:15:34 PM »

I recall that some eastern European engines designed for no/low nitro have instructions to add head shims, when using nitro.
Shims for use with higher nitro fuels is an expedient way to address the use of fuels with too high a nitro content. The "proper" way is to redesign the combustion chamber. Some of the more performance engine builders actually offered head/combustion chamber shapes for the anticipated nitro or exhaust system one might use, OPS and Picco come to mind.

Adding a .05 shim for tuning purposes is fine. But if one is going to change the nitro content say by 10%/15% or more, the head should be redesigned. Again we are talking about getting the most from ones engine. Not just will the engine run.

All the best,
Konrad
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