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Author Topic: Float PennyPlane Instructional Video  (Read 710 times)
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julio
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« on: June 22, 2013, 12:40:31 PM »

To many of us who need help with the "know how" of indoor duration, Ben Saks the author of the Kickstarter documentary "FLOAT", made a video of the construction of the FLOAT kit Pennyplane. If you have an hour and a half and you are interested in indoor builds you will enjoy the video a lot. To the more experienced, your contribution about your own methods would be of great help.

http://vimeo.com/68616979

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Julio
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I think I will stay a novice forever.
Flyguy
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2014, 07:26:28 PM »

nice video
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IndoorFlyer
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« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2014, 11:56:51 AM »

I could never see the point in using "quick and dirty" methods.  If you plan to build higher performance indoor models, a much higher degree of accuracy and precision is needed than shown in this video.  "Proper practice makes perfect".  You will have  much straighter and flatter surfaces from the get go, if you take a bit of care in the layout of the spars. Laying coins atop the spars in random positions, some pushing "outboard", some "inboard" is bound to introduce small stresses that will cause warps. I use an 18"+ metal scale with a center "0" as a trailing edge support..

I would recommend using the pattern provided, and lay out the spars on its outline.  

IMHO, developing the skills and techniques is part of the journey--it's not just to have a complete flying model in a (relatively) short amount of time.

« Last Edit: April 13, 2014, 12:07:50 PM by IndoorFlyer » Logged
Maxout
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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2014, 12:00:06 PM »

To play devil's advocate, the current Cat I record F1D was built by forming the tips around a handy curved surface and assembling over drawings using coins as in the video. The boron was installed free-hand, motorstick bracing was scavenged from spiderwire, etc. I did build a dihedral jig, but got frustrated with it an went back to pinning down scraps of wood to get it set. Wing and stab post/tube alignment was done freehand with CA.
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ykleetx
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« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2014, 01:18:24 PM »

Yup, there is no right or wrong way to build.  It's right if the model flies well.  If the model doesn't fly well, make the needed improvements.  Some times it is due to the way it was built, but more often it is because the trim, rubber, and prop are not set up correctly.  In my experience, the most important thing is to FLY the model.  Only by flying will you really understand it.

I build by the lazy-man method.  I'm not proud of it, but it works most of the time.  If quick and dirty is good enough, I'll do it.  How do I know if it's good enough?  From flying its predecessors and from flying it in the future.
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Olbill
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« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2014, 02:49:36 PM »

I admire Ben for all the work he has put into the promotion of our hobby. If he thinks his methods are acceptable then that is good enough for me. My only issue with the video after spending about 30 seconds skimming thru it is why he would choose condenser paper for covering. One of my pet peeves is the perception (from people who haven't built indoor models) that Mylar covering is "harder" to do than tissue covering. Mylar covering is BY FAR easier than tissue covering.

And then also - why on earth would you want to suggest that condenser paper is appropriate for covering a Limited Penny Plane? A lot of beginning indoor modelers have trouble building models close to the minimum weight. The lightest condenser paper I know of for sale weighs about 720mg for a LPP wing and stab. OS film for the same area weighs about 80mg. That's a lot of weight to squander on an illogical choice of materials.
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Steven Wrigley
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« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2014, 10:43:37 PM »

When I built your a6 Bill I had a heck of a time covering. I used the heavy c-paper though. I used a purple gluestick and that was a PAIN to apply to such a light structure. I didnt have any 77 spray glue at the time or I would have used that. Mylar film is 1000x easier to use. But to Floats defense it may have been a financial decision to use c-paper.
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