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Author Topic: Prop Spinner  (Read 734 times)
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High Point
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« on: July 09, 2013, 11:43:23 AM »

Is there a good technique to carve/shape this little spinner for a peanut size model I'm building?

Thanks,
Curtis
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Bredehoft
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2013, 12:10:30 PM »

N6 and N7 are meant to be the basis of your spinner.  It is not clear (to me) what they expect you to do between N6 and N7.  In addition, I have always found mating a spinner to a plastic prop difficult.

When I built my Tailwind Peanut, I made a similar spinner, but it was mated to a hand-carved prop and I could make the hub of the prop 1/4" square.  Then, after I haped the spinner, I could cut out a 1/4" square slot and simply slide the spinner over the prop hub.

http://volareproducts.com/wp-content/gallery/peanut-wittman-tailwind/start16.jpg

--george
Prop Spinner
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Bredehoft
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2013, 12:14:40 PM »

Re-examining your photo, it looks like N6 comes from the front, halfway back - and N7 comes from the back, halfway to the front.  That is, stacked together, they are the full depth of the spinner.  The idea is to stack them, sand them to shape and them fit them around the prop.  Again, fitting to a plastic prop has never been easy for me. 

--george
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wordguy
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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2013, 09:26:32 AM »

Hi, High.  I build-up a balsa cylinder from MANY cross-grained balsa disks (in the cast of a peanut, 1/16" or 1/32").  Using a drill press, tack glue a piece of 1/16" dowel, bamboo, etc. into the cylinder.  Chuck the affair into the dremel, and on lowest speed, use emery board to spin to shape.  The mandrel is then removed.  To fit around the prop, I slot the spinner, again with the dremel, usually with a diamond-grit disk.  The spinner is glued to the prop (prop, bearing, shaft already mounted in nose block), and using rigorous TLAR analysis methods (That Looks About Right), by spinning the prop gently I get the spinner running as true as possible.  When the glue is dry, I fill the slot with any of the micro-balloon type spackling compounds (I think I'm using Red Devil right now), allow to dry, sand to fit prop and spinner contours, and seal/strengthen with a couple applications of full strength dope. Allow to dry, finish sand, and seal and finish the spinner as you usually do.  Yes, the problem is that there is no free-wheeling capability.  The virtue is that its relatively simple, and gives reasonably good results.
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As it is not at all likely that any means of suspending the effect of air-resistance can ever be devised, a flying-machine must always be slow and cumbersome. . . . But as a means of amusement, the idea of aerial travel has great promise.

— T. Baron Russell, 'A hundred Years Hence,' 1905
High Point
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2013, 10:07:38 AM »

Thanks gentlemen for the tips, I appreciate it. Let you know how it turns out.

Curtis
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