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Author Topic: Anyone else like electric power for Vintage planes?  (Read 3389 times)
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Pit
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« Reply #25 on: October 18, 2011, 10:19:08 AM »

I'm torn between a four-stroke and electric for a Carl Goldberg "SAILPLANE" (full-size), but I'm not up-to-date on the SAM rules for vintage power/RC assist (gotta get around to joining that bunch).  Before I really get into the build, I've got to restore my RC motor skills with an EASY GLIDER PRO.  It's been too long...
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Mike Myers
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« Reply #26 on: December 15, 2011, 02:57:27 PM »

Steve Moskal and the boys down in Albuquerque are promoting a new "Electric Replica" event.  It will be flown at the Southwest Regionals in Eloy in January 2012.   Limit of 36" wing span and a SAM eligible design (pre 1942).  Any motor, a 2 cell lipo pack, and a 2 minute motor run allowed.  I'm not certain what time they've set for a max flight, but a little brushless outrunner and say a 2 cell 450 mah pack is going to get a 36 inch airplane up pretty danged high in 2 minutes time.

Practically speaking there are a lot of 020 Replica event designs and kits out there.  I think the two largest 020 Replica designs that I'm familiar with--the Sr. Playboy and the Goldberg Sailplane have 36 inch wingspans or maybe even just 35".  So there are a lot of choices for designs.  Put in a small 2.4 Ghz receiver and some 5 gram servos, and you're good to go with a contest ship---and a great park flyer.  What's not to like?
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davereap
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« Reply #27 on: January 02, 2012, 02:22:33 AM »

Hello   ..
For old timers plans rcgroups have a thread with over 2000 plans posted
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1265873
They are keeping it for pre1960 designs, and there are all the classic models there... from the likes of KeilKraft, Comet..
With some relly pretty models
The thread is 500pages+ but along the top under 'thread tools' you can show the attatchments only, rather than working through all the pages..

lots of the models shown are the ones I really wanted but couldnt afford as a youngster.

Its worth a look and some time downloading..
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juancar
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« Reply #28 on: January 30, 2012, 05:32:31 PM »

Does anyone know why older planes were so small?  Shocked
nowadays rc planes are getting bigger, i bet most of the modern pilots cant handle a 50 cm (20 inch) plane, while it was a usual size not long ago.
On my opinion, electric power is the best choice for 'small' planes: small for me means up to 1-1.20m (40-48 inches), while for bigger planes I prefer glow power. For scale planes, 4 stroke is my favourite choice   Wink
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thymekiller
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« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2012, 03:39:55 AM »

davereap,  Thanks very much for the link.  Have only gotten a couple pages into it and have fallen in love with vintage all over again!!!
Thanks. COOL link.
 
Pit, if your looking for votes, I vote electric.  Much less fuss and no fuel issues at the field.  Depends on how much you like the sound of a engine.  They sound like weed eaters to me.  Grin Grin  To each his own.   
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slipstick
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« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2012, 04:30:44 AM »

Does anyone know why older planes were so small?  Shocked
What like the Spook, 96" span, the similar size Lanzo Record Breaker or the 88" Flying Quaker ? And when you say modern RC planes are getting bigger I guess you're not thinking of the 15-18" UltraMicro models which are today's best sellers Wink ?

There is now and always was a wide range of sizes. For the smallest there are no IC engines that will work. For the very largest (1/3 scale aerobatic models etc) electric is still a bit impractical and petrol/gas is the way to go. Fortunately I don't like very big models so for anything I want to fly electric works best though I still keep a few old diesels on C/L models, just for the noise and the smell of my youth Smiley.

Steve
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Pit
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« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2012, 10:07:17 AM »

The "old" planes that were set up for RC glow engines were hampered (?) by the max size of the then available engines - which was ~0.60 cu. in. (10cc) with only about 1.3 Hp (SAE).  One exception was the FOX .78 that came out in the '60s (I think).  The models were also quite heavy by todays standards, so they were fairly small - around 60-65" for most pattern aircraft.  The older aircraft for ignition engines varied from quite small to huge and the engines were not much bigger - displacement wise - than the glow engines that followed.  You really have to hear an ingition engine running full song - beautiful!

Thyme:  The problem deciding WHICH power source to use is complicated  in that I HAVE both an Outrunner (Spitz 40 from BMI) and an almost new OS FS48 Surpass sitting around doing nothing... Undecided.  With vivid recollection of Valkyries and Sailplanes (original GOLDBERG) imbedded in my brain, electric is almost a blasphemy!  BUT... Undecided Undecided
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thymekiller
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« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2012, 06:28:21 PM »

Quote
With vivid recollection of Valkyries and Sailplanes (original GOLDBERG) imbedded in my brain, electric is almost a blasphemy!  BUT... Undecided Undecided
Grin Grin
I guess that's true.  Your memories go back farther than mine.   Wink Grin
It's a shame Mr. Goldberg is not here today to give us his thoughts.    As an innovator, I bet he would go electric.  Roll Eyes Roll Eyes 
 
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Eduardo Yamin
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« Reply #33 on: January 30, 2013, 06:01:51 AM »

We flew recently an electrified Kerswap (1,8m wingspan) in La Plata, province of Buenos Aires.
Huge tail moment and a giant tail stabilizer makes the model sensational to fly.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-uW23T7WG5eQ/UI11Xtze_hI/AAAAAAAAToE/-DkTxigbkT4/s800/DSC04671.JPG

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-zf8v1d85Kyg/UI11Xe7K-jI/AAAAAAAAToM/mRwuNwBu5hA/s800/DSC04693.JPG

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-XH-42sk5dcA/UI11XW4XPJI/AAAAAAAAToA/-lDtavhvpeU/s800/DSC04697.JPG
Anyone else like electric power for Vintage planes?
Anyone else like electric power for Vintage planes?
Anyone else like electric power for Vintage planes?
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Starduster
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« Reply #34 on: January 30, 2013, 10:45:53 AM »

I am a FreeFlighter at heart. I have flown all kinds of FreeFlight over the years, from AMA Power to F1B. I have always really enjoyed flying "Old Timers". I love the old designs and the elegance of those old designs.

I now live in the North East, and to be frank, there are no good flying fields within a reasonable driving distance.

A little over a year ago I looked at all those airplanes I had in boxes and hanging from the rafters, and thought "what a waste".

I started doing a little research into electric R/C (the Horror!) and found, like many others, the technology has greatly improved over the years. I had an old 72mhg Futaba Skysport 4 so I took a almost complete 60 inch Sal Taibi (RIP) Powerhouse. I had originally built the airplane for FreeFlight 1/2A Texaco. I put that old Futaba radio in it, added a Park 400 and covered it with Parklite.

Well, I gotta tell you, it is so much fun to simply go down to the local softball field on a warm sunny morning and fly the airplanes. I've had many, many flights close to an hour in duration. I fly all of my airplanes like "guided FreeFlights" I touch the sticks on the transmitter as little as possible, and there have been many times when I set the transmitter down, pick up my coffee mug and just watch the airplane circle around above my head.

No, it's not FreeFlight. But... when the option is letting the airplanes rot in the basement?

I am attaching a picture of part of my fleet. You see the Powerhouse, a Goldberg Zipper 'A' and a Korda Wakefield (Which is an amazing electric flyer, BTW)

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Re: Anyone else like electric power for Vintage planes?
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« Reply #35 on: April 19, 2014, 12:52:09 PM »

Well yes!  I like to mess with them as I don't have to have the lightning reflexes that I used to have.  Ha!  I am just now finishing a Buzzard Bombshell (65% size) and a Trenton Terror.  I think that they will add some class to the local flying site that is mostly aerobatic.  Just kidding.  I really like them because they take me back to the 1950's when my dad and I had many a fine day on the back nine of the local golf course.  Snort3
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