Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin (Account/Technical Issues)  |  Contact Global Moderator
October 23, 2020, 06:53:46 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build  (Read 3639 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« on: November 27, 2013, 09:22:00 AM »

Hello everybody,
As announced in "Went Flying" I start my building thread for a Pilatus PC-6 mainly made from paper. The design
is from the member "dalat", who made the printing file using some sophisticated 3-D px. I use this file through courtesy of dalat.
My building thread is mainly a series of self explaining pictures, as my english is not so good to give a lot of commentaries. It may be interesting, as this building method is a mix of conventional stick and tissue techniques and cardboard model techniques not so well known to free flight modelers.
To give you an idea of the finished "product" first some pictures of the finished model and some facts:
Span: 253mm (10")
Length: 180mm
Weight without rubber motor: 2,42g
Best flight until now: 46 sec.
A video of the model flying in gym may be seen in
www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xvX_R6AeWA

In the next message the first steps
Slowfly55
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2013, 09:56:52 AM »

Sorry, a bad start.
I hope this'll work better:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xvX_R6AeWA

slowfly55
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2013, 10:37:49 AM »

Today I started with the printing of the paper model using the file developed by "dalat".

I decided to print on 50g/m paper. 40g/m would also have been possible, but a little on the weak side. The
fuselage must be enough stiff for the tension of the rubber motor. Paper heavier than 50g/m will result in a nice scale plane, but indoor flying will be a little compromised. I like slow flights as we see them from the real PC-6.

Printing is on an EPSON printer. I like the ink of this printer, as it is water- and acetone resistent.
To avoid crimpling of the thin paper in the machine I lightly glue the 50g/m paper onto a normal 80g/m sheet with a glue stick.

Then I cut out the fuselage using a razor blade for the straight lines and very fine scissors. A rounded one is
ideal for the openings of the cockpit windows.

Next I cut out a small strip for covering these windows from a plastic sheet and glued it behind the openings.
A thinner plastic would have saved weight, but the the scale appearance is much better with a totally flat sheet reflecting the lights.

slowfly55
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Logged
RalphS
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 25
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 927



Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2013, 01:45:37 PM »

It looks to be an excellent flier for the size of model.  I think it was Bill Dennis who reminded us of Mike Hetherington's paper planes that use paper plus balsa. 

Looking forward to the build.
Logged
billdennis747
Palladium Member
********

Kudos: 64
Online Online

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 4,209



Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2013, 01:57:52 PM »

Yes, that reminds me very much of Mike's technique. He would have had a field day with modern computer printing because he had to paint it all on. I am trying to remember the papers Mike used and seem to recall that for smaller models he used airmail paper. 50g/m2 seems a lot.  Mike's models were very slow flyers.
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2013, 04:57:46 PM »

Hi Bill Dennis and Spadge,

That sounds very interesting. Though a longtime subscriber of Aeromodeller I never heard of Mike Hetherington and his famous paper planes.

You are right, 50g/m paper is rather on the heavy side.I built the same model with  40g/m paper, totalling a weight of 2,2g and flying a little slower. I had to laser print to avoid crimpling by the printing fluid. Next step
would be 30g/m airmail paper, but the printing results were no satisfying. As you'll see in the later building process,
I use 20g/m paper for the rudder and tailplane for proper balancing.
Below my UN version with 40g/m paper.

slowfly55
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Logged
RolandD6
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 24
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 848




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2013, 06:28:13 PM »

Hi Slowfly55

I watched your video and was very impressed. I had thought about doing something similar but had no idea that paper less than 80 gsm and suitable for inkjet or laser printing was available.

I have some airmail paper in the form of a writing pad but it has printed lines on it; not very useful.

My questions are obvious, "what is the name of the papers you using?" and "where do you get them from?"

I feel certain that other people would also like to know your answers.

Paul
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2013, 10:15:29 AM »

Hi Paul

You hit the very point: Thin Paper!
For me it' a long story,about 20 years of selecting and collecting paper like others do with indoor balsa wood, only much more painstaking.

There is an abundance of perfect paper in the 40-50g/m2 range, namely the medical information leaflets in every pillbox, however printed and folded. Here in Switzerland/Germany/France it is practically impossible to get hold of such fine paper, as it is only sold in quantities of some tons. You must know somebody using such paper commercially. I got such paper 10 years ago from a friend.

This year I could buy very fine paper 40 and 50g/m2 from a German manufacturer in a reasonable quantity
(1000 sheets). Look for "creativFLOORPOST 40 or 50" under www.papier-und-mehr.de. He also sells only to business enterprises or people with liberal profession (as me).  The 40g/m2 paper can only been laserprinted but is quite strong and relatively white. The UN PC-6 in the picture above is built with such paper.

I am not aquainted with the situation in other countries or in Australia but hope you find some way checking the internet or knowing somebody in the printing business.

slowfly55

Logged
RolandD6
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 24
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 848




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2013, 02:44:48 PM »

Thanks for the information Slowfly55.

After posting my questions, I poked around the web for a while and found a number of 40gsm papers. Trouble is, one needs to see and try a sample.

The first that got my attention was something called 'bible paper', presumably a thin paper for printing pages of bound bibles. There appears to be other types around but more searching is needed.

Thanks again

Paul
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2013, 10:41:51 AM »

Today begins the fun: I started to fold the floppy paper sheet into a 3-D plane.

First I had to add paper strips of 4mm to the sides where the fuselage is closed.

Folding the sides of the rear fuselage was done by aid of a 1,5mm steel wire. The rounded edges of the Turbo Porter add much to the charm of this plane.

The position of the balsa formers and reinforcements is seen in black on the plan below. All formers are made of a 6#  2x0.8mm balsa strip. I could have done lighter, but this time I wanted it solid. Not much weight can be saved by the formers, perhaps about 20-30mg. The weight penality of using too much glue is much heavier. So I always try to use glue very sparingly.

I already glued the rear and the second former into the fuselage and closed the rear fuselage. As far as possible I use the glue stick, only when it becomes to bulky and too cumbersome I use "UHU Hart" normal balsa glue from a small dispenser.

Enjoy, slowfly55
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Logged
Indoorflyer
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 23
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,292



Ignore
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2013, 03:11:02 PM »

I've "tried" some paper models, still on the steep part of the learning curve...  (I have a partially completed deHavilland Beaver languishing on the bench right now)

Your Pilatus is very nicely done; there is definitely an art to doing this, and I admire your skills.  The flight video is very impressive.
Logged
flydean1
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 26
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,173



Ignore
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2013, 07:12:23 PM »

I corresponded with Mike some years ago.  He pre-treated his paper with very thin dope.  Probably 20% nitrate.  Some suitable paper from an architect's office was located.  It was sort of pale tan/yellow and called tracing paper.  Probably not available in this digital age.  I built a Fokker D7 fuselage using his technique, and was able to do a very relistic reproducion of inspection plates, fastners, and the divide between the nose sheet metal and fabric covered aft portion of the fuselage.  Did not complete the model as it lacked hard points for the cabane struts.  My bad Sad
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #12 on: November 30, 2013, 04:41:37 AM »

Thank you for your nice words, Indoorflyer. What I intend with this thread is to encourage indoor scale modellers like you to go on with your projects. The De Havilland Beaver could be done similar to the PC-6, the rear fuselage has also rounded edges. The easiest way to get aquainted with this fundamentally different approach - first the skin, then the structure - is to fold one of the hundreds of cardboard models available and then to adapt it accordingly. I began with a "Bird-Dog" from Fiddler's Green, a rather easy to fold Pistachio model, that did'nt need
many balsa reinforcements and finally did some 20" flights.
flydean1, I believe the Fokker D7 to be a paper model with good flying potential and there are many fine cardboard models of this famous aircraft available. Perhaps you try again, when this thread is finished and all
construction techniques explained.
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2013, 08:18:49 AM »

Hello,

Formers 3 and 4 have been added,the last one with the paper control panel glued on. Then I added  strips of very thin balsa on both sides of the front fuselage. They are in touch with the conical balsa tube, that fills the front. This results in a very stiff structure. Before I did this reinforcement it happened,
that the front fuselage was compressed after the airplane had bumped into a wall.

Looking at the pictures below you easily grasp the basic idea of my approach to indoor scale. It is mainly a paperplane. Balsa elements are added only so far as the intrinsic strength of the paper structure itself is not sufficient for a rubber powered plane.

The balsa tube was inserted and glued in and the intakes added. Now the fuselage had it's final form and I was curious about the weight, the moment of truth
had come. The scale indicated 0.975 g, about 60mg heavy, but still within the budget. It is worth the effort to go on with the build.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2013, 03:03:00 PM »

Today I could spare an hour for building. Just enough for going on with the tailplane and rudder. I chose 20g/m2 paper for these surfaces in order to keep the tail of the model very light - and so spare ballast on the front.
Paper is ordinary tissue paper as it is for instance used to wrap up flowers. From different tissue papers I selected the paper with the best printig results.
Construction is straightforward with 2 light spars of indoor balsa wood. While cutting the rudder I made a mistake and had to add a small strip for glueing the front part.For the first time I dropped the vertical spar in the rudder. The paper structure itself adds enogh rigidity.
The tailplane needs negative incidence. Therefore I make a cut into the rear fuselage and form it into a valley fold.
In order to allow for later adjustments I secure the tailplane very lightly with only some points of UHU hart glue,
that can easlily be dissolved.
Weight of both surfaces is 145mg and the whole work is now 1,125g.

slowfly55
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Logged
Tilou
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 2
Offline Offline

Belgium Belgium

Posts: 76



Ignore
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2013, 09:52:23 AM »

It's a very beautiful Works
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2013, 02:15:53 PM »

Tilou,

thank you for your kind words. My first encounter with rubber-powered indoor scale models was in Belgium at the legendary "Flémalle" contests. Unforgettable and the starting point of my passion.

BTW I uploaded - with the help of Ratz - the printing files for this and the UN Turbo Porter into the Plan Gallery. Some of you may already have noticed. I hope it'll be easier to follow the thread, when you have the plan before you.

Don't panick, when you notice half of the wing cut off on the plan. As you'll see later, it's all we need.

slowfly55
Logged
Ace Dugan
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 81



Ignore
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2013, 05:51:20 PM »

slowfly

Thank you very much for posting the drawing.  It's very helpful and maybe down the road we could find(purchase) other plans by the designer.  It's enlarged my imagination on how to do some things greatly, thanks again....

Ace
Logged
dorme
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 6
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 138



Ignore
« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2013, 09:24:00 PM »

slowfly, thank you for your efforts on this aircraft which seem to have turned out well in your favor.  A question here as to the size of the prop and what you used for a motor (length and size)?  Although, I don't have immediate access to light paper, I have had an interesting time building this out of standard printing paper and UHU glue, plus a few small pieces of balsa just to keep some wood in the works. I have blown it up to a 12" WS (55% of original plan).  I'll let you know the weight and progress shortly.
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2013, 06:06:59 AM »

dorme,

I am happy to hear, that you give it a try - even not having at your disposal light paper. BLOWING IT UP - that's the way to go. I started with 8" span (Pistachio), blowed it up to 10" and plan to go to 13" (Peanut) with 60g paper.
If you build light your 12" will fly too, even built  with standard printing paper. Wait to see the wing construction, that seems to be determinative for the good flying characteristics.

The prop I used with this model is 90mm dia (3,55"),motors are depending of the final weight of the model,
0.65 -0.70g/m, 200 - 230mm length.

Please inform us all of your progress. So others will be encouraged to give papermodels a try.

slowfly55
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2013, 02:56:56 PM »

Scale matters

The PC-6 plan for this model is 100% scale and of course the build should also be true scale. Therefore the rounded edges of the fuselage, that some models dispense of, therefore no enlarged tailplane and therefore also a landing gear, that is not lengthed. That means that no ROG flights are possible with a standard prop. I feel that the appeal of this aircraft would too much suffer by a non scale undercarriage.

Building the landing gear goes with the same techniques adapted to stick and tissue models. So nothing much
has to be explained. I made the wheels from blue foam. For the structural parts of the landing gear I used my
favorite material : "Reeds". Please look at the picture if there is a doubt about what i mean. Reed is a wonderful material, unsurpassed for lightness and rigiditiy. The slightly conical supports at both  sides are paper tubes.

I had to decide about the wheels: freewheeling or not. As ROG is not provided  there is no necessity for the wheels to rotate. I built some very light PC-6 this way. But honestly, wheels that do not turn are in a way nonsensical. So I took the pain to put some short lengths of syringe tube into them for a .016" music wire axle. All with the idea of later testing a small 60mm 3-blade prop for ROG back in my mind.

As the overall weight of 1,385g indicated, I built a little too heavy.

slowfly55
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2013, 10:07:26 AM »

Likes and dislikes

Heat forming the cabin windshield is not my favorite occupation and I had to make several attempts, the plastic sheet either softening too fast or too slow.
The outcome was not perfect, but I had no better plastic material for the moment. I'd be happy if it was possible to form a windshield without this nasty process. Unfortunately it has a curvature lenthwise and chordwise, so I see no other way. I still hope that there is an easier method and a reader of this thread will reveal it.
Then - as a recompense - I added some details: exhaust pipes, the light on top of the cabin and the rear wheel. I really like this nifty paperwork, and - as Bill Hannan put it - "a little extra time spent for the details can greatly ernhance visual appeal and "sparkle".
Next time the wing.

slowfly55
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Re: Pilatus PC-6 1:60 paper plane build
Logged
Ace Dugan
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 81



Ignore
« Reply #22 on: December 19, 2013, 12:15:47 PM »

Slowfly,

Did you do anything to the ends of the tail surfaces to give them a sense of thickness?  I know the horizontal stab has two balsa spars, but are the paper edges just glued back to back?  Thanks...

Ace
Logged
slowfly55
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 1
Offline Offline

Switzerland Switzerland

Posts: 39

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #23 on: December 20, 2013, 05:58:37 AM »

Hallo Ace

The paper ends are -as you presume - just glued to the end of the tailplane and the 2 spars. As they have a tendance to bend I make them with 50 or 60g paper. BTW these ends are not there to give an illusion of thickness, they are truly scale. It is one of the lovely details of this airplane.

slowfly55
Logged
Ace Dugan
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 81



Ignore
« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2013, 08:04:31 AM »

Thanks slowfly, I realize those are end plates on the stab tips.  I was just interested in the paper to paper edges and you answered my question.  Thanks again...

Ace
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!