Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin  |  Contact Global Moderator
December 14, 2019, 04:57:42 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 ... 28   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal  (Read 152973 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
glidermaster
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 19
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 861




Ignore
« Reply #350 on: June 02, 2015, 06:54:29 PM »

Yup, me too!
Logged

Gliders are a part of me.
FF Bruce
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 13
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 485



Ignore
« Reply #351 on: June 02, 2015, 09:37:37 PM »

Mark some sad news ,my friend Marty Thompson that was second at your first postal passed away on May 27th.I talked him into building a "My Coupe" and send in his times.This ended up being his last time on the flying field.We had a blast it was like a contest of just us and we tied.Not sure how you feel about letting someone flying his model in this years contest he was looking forward to kicking my butt this time(his model only has 7 flights on it and 5 of those where officials).I hope I can,he was my flying buddy for 50 years.    Bruce   
Logged
Mark Braunlich
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 76
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,037


Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #352 on: June 03, 2015, 03:19:47 PM »

Sure Bruce, you can fly Marty's MY COUPE.  Sorry to hear you lost your flying buddy.  Glad your last time flying with him was such a good time.  I lost one of my model flying buddies in 2014.  My flying buddy, Rudy, was handicapped through having only one leg following a railroad accident in the 1950s.  I flew proxy for him several times while he was still living, so sure....have at it. 

My condolences to Marty's family.
Logged

Mark
dputt7
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 90
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 1,991




Ignore
« Reply #353 on: June 11, 2015, 06:37:23 AM »

   Sad news indeed Bruce, Marty might be able to help you pick some good air when you fly his coupe, Good luck.

   Well after a few nights rereading both coupe threads and going through all my Aero Modellers and Model Aircraft mags  I finally decided on Deuzio  published as a full size plan in Aero Modeller December 1969.
    Haven't done much, just a fuselage side, had to extend my building board a couple of inches and even using the panorama function on my camera couldn't get it all in.
There might be a lesson there that will become obvious later Grin
At least its a start.
Dave
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Logged
THB
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 17
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 623


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #354 on: June 13, 2015, 09:02:51 PM »

Nice start Dave.
Ok...  I'm in.

Q.  Is the George Matherat 'OOSH!' an 80 or 100g model?
(SOC Reply #37 on: April 04, 2014, 02:34:48 AM)

The 3-view published in Feb 65 MRA.

Tim
Logged

Tim
"Life is what happens while you're busy making other planes."
THB
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 17
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 623


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #355 on: June 16, 2015, 05:43:07 AM »

I think I've moved on from 'OOSH!' but will decide shortly...  so I can get something built.
Tim
Logged

Tim
"Life is what happens while you're busy making other planes."
Soc
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 2
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 107



Ignore
« Reply #356 on: June 16, 2015, 07:15:54 AM »

Hi Tim

I'm pretty sure that the 100 gm weight for the MRA comp came in some time early in the 70s so OOSH would be an 80 gm model. The 100gm designs of that era seem to be from Eastern Europe.

However for the purposes of this competition, models that were originally 100gm can be built to 80gm.
Thus the original weight makes no difference, except possibly to the amount of wood and ease of building down to the target weight. From this point of view many attractive designs do seem to use a lot of sheet balsa in the fuselage.

Sean
Logged
THB
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 17
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 623


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #357 on: June 16, 2015, 08:06:04 AM »

Thanks Sean - I'm currently looking at Alain Landeau's 'Pamela' 1963 (April 64 Aeromodeller).
cheers
Tim
Logged

Tim
"Life is what happens while you're busy making other planes."
dputt7
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 90
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 1,991




Ignore
« Reply #358 on: June 16, 2015, 08:44:33 AM »

     Pamela seems a good choice, it was on my list as well but I just got lazy as I had the Deuzio plan.  As to sheeted fuselages I considered Henry Strucks Boom Daze but when I drew out the fullsize pod it was huge and the square boom was a bit odd. It also used a rather thick airfoil that put me off, though I'm sure Mr Struck knew what he was about.
    Some progress on Deuzio
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Logged
PeeTee
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 48
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 2,252



Ignore
« Reply #359 on: June 16, 2015, 11:07:12 AM »

Quote
I'm pretty sure that the 100 gm weight for the MRA comp came in some time early in the 70s

Coupe was an FAI class by then. Jean Wantzenreither wrote that 100g was a spec change for 1971 and it came back to 80g inc rubber in 1980 - at the same time the fuselage cross section rule was abolished.

Peter
Logged
cd_webb
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 228



Ignore
« Reply #360 on: June 20, 2015, 08:03:00 PM »

With little (or no) thought, I decided to make an attempt at building my first Coupe with the intention of making a probably feeble attempt at joining the competition. I've built a dozen or more rubber powered models, so I'm not completely ignorant, but these seem to me to be a slightly different animal than most of what I've done.

Before I began reading here, and the earlier thread, I had no idea what a Coupe was or where a plan for one could be found. The "Nikolina" was pretty much an arbitrary choice, based mostly on the fact that there was a plan offered for a small fee (Thanks Mark!).

After receiving the plan in the mail and looking it over, I decided to tackle what I perceived to be the most difficult part of the build - the front end. Three tries, and a week later, I managed to get part of it done.

I made the decision to build it as close to exactly the way the plan shows as possible. I'm sure there are easier, acceptable ways of doing some things, but this one, I'd like to do the way it was drawn.

Now for a couple of rookie questions. I took a pic of the plan showing the prop blank. In the side view of the blank, which side is the front? Next question, what stops the blade from folding itself too far forward when under power? Is it simply the square cut? If so, then the radius cut would be at the rear of the blank and allow the prop to fold? I feel stupid asking, but I've nearly looked the ink off the paper and still can't be sure.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Logged
dputt7
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 90
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 1,991




Ignore
« Reply #361 on: June 20, 2015, 09:00:25 PM »

    Hi CD 
                 Good to see some more action on this thread, and yes you are correct it is the square cut that locates the blade position and the flat side of the blade, closest to the edge of the page, is the rear of the blade. As a beginner in duration models as well, my best advice to you would be make sure each component is built as light as possible, some plans have a breakdown of component weights as a guide, not sure about Nickolina but check on other plans.  Hope to see more.
                                                                                                                                                                                                            Dave
Logged
billdennis747
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 54
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,719



Ignore
« Reply #362 on: June 21, 2015, 01:20:25 AM »

Hi CD
Something in the back of my mind tells me there was an error with the prop which Aeromodeller corrected in the following issue (Jan 1965?). I´m away so I can´t check.
Nikolina is small so must be built right down to weight.
Logged
mike
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 5
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 126




Ignore
« Reply #363 on: June 21, 2015, 07:07:33 AM »

Hello Bill,
You set me off into the archive.......  The Nikolina correction was in the February 1965 issue - pix below.  The December 1965 issue, of course, had the Baron Knight as you well know.  It was that model that got me into Free Flight Contest Flying for the 40 years after that.....
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
« Last Edit: June 21, 2015, 07:17:38 AM by mike » Logged
mike
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 5
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 126




Ignore
« Reply #364 on: June 21, 2015, 07:13:45 AM »

Sorry about the quality but I think they're useable. I had to reduce to get them to post.

Second and final picture attached.

Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Logged
mike
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 5
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 126




Ignore
« Reply #365 on: June 21, 2015, 07:32:15 AM »

For completeness, here's what the Jan 65 issue had in the text and an image of the original free plan - looks the same as CD's.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
« Last Edit: June 21, 2015, 08:11:25 AM by mike » Logged
cd_webb
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 228



Ignore
« Reply #366 on: June 21, 2015, 09:02:58 AM »

Dave, Bill and Mike, thanks for the input! I was hesitant to post such a modest amount of work, and to ask such a question, but it paid off for me - and at the right time. Still not sure how anybody remembers anything from 1965, or can find an article from that time either, but glad you did!

After posting last night, I slipped 2, 12" tubes into the hub and checked the measurements at either end as the instructions stated, and found that I had apparently not taken enough care in building the hub. I may need to make a 4th try since the measurements differed by 3/32" in 12" of length. Instructions said that the tube bearings must be parallel - mine are definitely NOT. Oh well, it looked purdy anyway, and there's plenty of time. It won't take as long this time. I still have the jig I made for my last try. Just need to exercise a little more care in assembly and drilling.

David
Logged
mike
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 5
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 126




Ignore
« Reply #367 on: June 21, 2015, 09:52:14 AM »

All I remember is where I might have put things.

A trick I learnt on the Baron Knight was in lining up the fold tube in the blade root.  You have a slightly oversize hole in the root dowel, put the tube in with epoxy and then set the blade up on the pitch gauge with a long piece of wire through the hinge tube.  Then you can set up the hinge axis exactly where you want it and hold it there while the epoxy cures.  Do a dry assembly first to make sure the tube is free to go to the correct position without forcing it.  Then get the glue all round the loose tube and let it cure.

You could get your parallel in a similar way.  Fit three of the ply hinge plates, put the parallel wires into place while you stick the fourth hinge (slightly oversize) plate in place.  Finish the hinge plate to size after the glue has set.
Finally do the oversize hole with epoxied in bush trick on the hub hole to get it perpendicular to the hinges.

Edited to add clarifying words.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2015, 11:00:05 AM by mike » Logged
cd_webb
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 228



Ignore
« Reply #368 on: June 21, 2015, 06:46:03 PM »

Fourth time's a charm...
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Logged
FLYACE1946
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 26
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,552




Ignore
« Reply #369 on: June 23, 2015, 04:48:13 PM »

Thanks CD for your start. I have the plan for Nikolina and will also try to match the plan. Thanks for the inspiration to really stick to this design detail.
Logged
Hepcat
OOS, January 2019
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 278
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 1,777



Ignore
« Reply #370 on: June 23, 2015, 06:16:19 PM »

Cdw
I think you are very brave taking on the ‘Nikolina’, I don’t think that I could even make a set of tailplane ribs, seeing where the spars are, without breaking most of them.  Still you’ve given us an example of your workmanship on the hub so I guess you won’t have any problems. I noticed you were worrying about an alignment problem of less than half a degree – that’s not an error in my book!

Bill did mention keeping the weight down as there is not much wing area.  Well there is certainly a lot of wood there and so there is something to go at.  3/16” sheet for the sides of the wing mount looks silly, the 1/8” sheet fin could be weight (and in the wrong place) if you are not careful. 16g wire just to pivot the take off ‘stick’.  The propeller shaft also calls for 16g which I think would be very difficult to bend to the shape shewn.  Indeed if you look at the photograph of the hub assembly I am almost certain that is 18g wire.  If it was 16g it should be at least the size of the hole in the 14g aluminium tubing. That hinges the blades.

Talking of weight the plan does mention Soft balsa for the propeller blocks.  This was usual on old plans presumably because a large block was assumed to be heavy.  I think nowadays most people who have made a few props would say get quite a heavy block.  The best propellers have very thin blades so they don’t weigh much and a firm balsa is needed to carve them thin.

Staying with the propeller assembly, the noseblock is about the daftest thing I have seen for a long time and the correction in the extra bit of text confuses things even more as it is not clear whether it is the number of disks or the position needs transposing.

Anyway it will work if an N-2 disk is glued to the back face of the noseblock and an N-1 disk is glued to the back of the N-2 disk.  If the noseblock spigot part is now inserted through the nose former and given a partial turn then one of the corner of N-1 will rotate behind the nose former and hold the noseblock in place.

However the noseblock cannot them accept thrust line adjustment shims.  [As I write this I realize that one could use two N-2 disks glued to the noseblock which would allow shims but the noseblock would be free to rattle 1/16” so why bother with the twist to lock?]  You are probably thinking the same as me, ‘why bother to hold a Coupe noseblock in place anyway, the motor does that’.

What concerns me more is that pretty hemispherical noseblock which a careful builder will paint and polish to a very high standard.  How easy will it be to twist that and pull it out when the you have some lube on your fingers?

I hope that some of that makes sense!
John   
Logged

John Barker UK - Will be missed by all that knew him.
cd_webb
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 11
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 228



Ignore
« Reply #371 on: June 23, 2015, 10:23:07 PM »

Amazingly enough (me being me), I was able to follow your concerns. Some of them I've thought about quite a bit, some I've barely considered. Like I said before, Coupes are pretty foreign to me. I'm sitting here thinking that most everything on my plan is just standard construction techniques common to most Coupes - the nose block locking on in particular. And I definitely noticed the solid sheet fin and wondered why, and why there? Maybe it was needed to offset the weight of the prop, hub and block?

If I was able to understand the comp. rules correctly though, deviations from the plans are not allowed, right? If they were, a built up fin would have to happen. Same thing with the nose block - a simple plug in block. I wouldn't count on much paint nor polish on it if I were you, though. I can't paint for squat!

As small as this model is, it still must weight at least 80 grams. It still surprises me how fast they add up, so I'm making a special effort in the wood selection department.

Began carving prop blades last night. Mucho, Mucho thinning left to do. Since I didn't have any soft balsa block, I used what I had. It's some tough stuff, and has already caused bloodshed.

Thanks for your thoughts, John!
David
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Logged
billdennis747
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 54
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,719



Ignore
« Reply #372 on: June 24, 2015, 01:56:03 AM »


As small as this model is, it still must weight at least 80 grams. It still surprises me how fast they add up, so I'm making a special effort in the wood selection department.

CD the total weight must be 80g; that´s 70g model and 10g rubber
Logged
Mark Braunlich
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 76
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,037


Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #373 on: June 24, 2015, 08:25:48 AM »

If I was able to understand the comp. rules correctly though, deviations from the plans are not allowed, right? If they were, a built up fin would have to happen. Same thing with the nose block - a simple plug in block.

The rules don't say you can't make changes.  In many cases, all we have are small three-views and you have to improvise a lot of the design.  In the cases where you have a detailed full plan such as with Nikolina, you can make changes that you think prudent.  Try to imagine yourself as a teenager in the '60s building the model.  Would you have adhered to the plan exactly?  Probably not.  Just as an example with Nikolina, if I were building it, I'd add a snuffer tube for the D/T at the rear of the fuselage as I don't think I'd want to drop a burning fuse on the countryside these days.  If you want to reduce the amount of timber in this or any other eligible Coupe, please do so.   Just don't put more modern technology on the model.  Keep them simple; the exception being the allowance of mechanical timers where traditional fuse timers are not allowed by law.

Remember, there aren't going to be any judges going over your model.  As with any postal comp, adherence to the rules is a matter of your personal honor and conscience.

Carry on.   
Logged

Mark
dputt7
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 90
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 1,991




Ignore
« Reply #374 on: June 24, 2015, 08:47:15 AM »

Some more progress on Duezio..........style and grace, totally absent  Grin
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Re: 1960s Coupe d'Hiver Postal
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 ... 28   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!