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Author Topic: Is this a "U.S. Kid"?  (Read 813 times)
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Pit
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« on: February 18, 2009, 09:46:01 AM »

I've had this model for umpteen years. Built it from a baggie kit and more or less just thrown together with a sorta airfoil and just enough sanding to round things out. Flies OK and even got it to transition decently, and consistently. Launch heights? Not very high by my estimation, but I'm NOT a prolific HLG guider - once or twice a year and even less now that my mobility has been curtailed.

Light chucks from shoulder height in calm, no lift conditions were about 15 meters and the best time this brick (33Grams) EVER saw was 32 seconds. The glide was always nice and flat but the sink rate was way up there.

After going thru most of the HLG threads and making a few CLG's, I retrieved the Kid from the rafters early this morning and put it on a diet. Re-shaped the airfoil with the flat-backed, sharp high-point version, sanded down the tail feathers and re-shaped the rear fuselage section (egg shape). Net weight loss 5.6 grams! Back yard test was so nice that I promptly took a walk to my flying field for a proper test glide from shoulder height. Went clear across the field with a nice easy left turn - about 40( Shocked) meters! Did not seem to be any thermal activity.

Oh, well, my arm is in lousy shape and my balance is NOT good but I HAD to try Grin. Stop watch: check Wind up, throw, land on butt (got the watch started, tho), look for the model on the ground - not in sight. Shadow. Look skyward and there she is about thirty feet up circling nicely. Made 6 complete circles (definitely more since it took a bit to realize that it was still airborne) and landed with 58 seconds on the clock. It didn't seem to gain any more altitude and that thing had NEVER BEFORE completed more than 2 circles!

Thanks guys, you've been a GREAT help.

Went home right afterward - I think I sprained my shoulder.

Pete
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Is this a "U.S. Kid"?
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Kit
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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2009, 09:52:50 PM »

Pete,

Nope, that's not Tom Peadon's (aka "Tommy T") U.S. Kid, at least not the original version published in Flying Models in July 1970. Tom's design had a parabolic planform and an 18" span.

Kit
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Pit
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« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2009, 09:48:37 AM »

Thanks Kit. Everyone seems to be out - been rather quiet in ALL of the forums lately. Probably all busy working on one (or more) of the many cookups going on.

I've got the instruction sheet for the thing, SOMEplace, and I recall that it's a kit of a known beginner comp glider. 16 1/4 inch WS, built sometime in the '80's (early).

Pete
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probligo
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« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2009, 03:16:24 PM »

Out of a baggie kit, and 1/4" wing blank... Looks somewhat like an Airsail Satellite Cool. V good starter design whatever.
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50+AirYears
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« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2009, 01:59:42 AM »

I've found out since I got over 55 agewise, to stay active in HLG, I needed to do a lot of stretching my arm and shoulder before flying to keep from hurting. In fact, just this last Sunday, I got to the field for a contest, did my stretches, got in several trim flights, then spent an hour walking hgh grass in a search pattern, spent some more time flying some rubber, then tried to go back to HLG without more stretching. Bad move for these 65 year old joints. A day flying with stretching might leave me sore for a few hours, chucking without enough stretching can leave me hurting for a couple days.

I start with a bit of twisting and bending around the waist while holding the glider in my normal grip. I then stretch my throwing arm as far behind me with my arm more or less straight out, and slowly bring it across my body parallel to the ground, slowly going back and forth and holding at full stretch for a count of 5. After loosening up with this with maybe 10 movements, I hold the glider straight out to my side, then bring my arm over my head and try to touch the opposite shoulder. Again, I hold at both ends for about a count of 5. Also, as I feel the shoulder and elbow joints loosen up, I use my head as a fulcrum to raise my throwing shoulder higher.

I then go through the throwing motion at the correct angle, slowly, and without throwing the glider. I also make a fist, bend my throwing elbow about 90 degrees, and rotate the shoulder joint while trying to push my shoulder away from the body. I will often pull the right arm further to the left to get more flexibility.

Also, without holding the glider, I make a fist with my throwing had, as tight as I can, then reach out as far as I can at various angles while keeping the elbow straight.

After a throw, I repeat some of the motions. Also, my first 5 or 10 trim thows are light, with more emphasis on form rather than power. I build up to power throws slowly. And if for some reason, I have an interruption, like the rare long chase, or the more common long search, or flying something else, or just a BS session, I will repeat a lot of the stretches.

By doing the slow stretches, I can usually get in 20 or 30 flights in a day, with little more than some shoulder soreness that is gone by late the next day. If I don't do enough stretching, I have a short flying day, and have a sore shoulder for a couple days.

Funny, but flying OHLG ff, I often end up with a sore shoulder. With RC HLG, I have no shoulder problem, but end up with my elbow killing me.
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GaryO
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« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2011, 07:49:12 PM »

50+,

Your elbow problems when throwing RC hlg are due to not keeping the arm straight. Throw from the shoulder and waist, not the elbow or wrist.

Gary
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