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Author Topic: Bostonian "Pup", Peck model  (Read 2252 times)
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Pou Pou
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« on: May 16, 2014, 06:34:11 PM »

I am building a Bostonian "Pup' model by Peck.  I have completed both sides of the body and want to finish it.  My question is: is there a recommended approach, like glue the sides together at the stern then move toward the stem, or maybe something else?   Many thanks.
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Yak 52
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Jon Whitmore



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« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2014, 04:03:50 AM »

I would suggest starting in the middle and getting the 'box' area squared up with a jig first, then the 'stern' and forward former can be lined up on the centreline of the model.

Have a look at these threads for ideas
http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?topic=15508.0   Post #20
http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?topic=13147.0   Post #4

At the stern post, if you just try and stick the sides together they will usually be off center later - even if you line them up perfectly (profile view) It's better to line them up on the centreline (in the plan view) even if they are slightly offset against each other. A swipe of the sanding block sorts this later.

Not so easy explain - easier to show perhaps!


Jon

http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13147.0;attach=85297;image
Bostonian "Pup", Peck model
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wordguy
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« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2014, 10:15:31 AM »

Jon:  Intrigued by the legos.  Do you stick 'em down somehow, or do they have sufficient weight to stay put?  FWIW, I use the same technique you describe for ass'y of fuse sides.
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As it is not at all likely that any means of suspending the effect of air-resistance can ever be devised, a flying-machine must always be slow and cumbersome. . . . But as a means of amusement, the idea of aerial travel has great promise.

— T. Baron Russell, 'A hundred Years Hence,' 1905
Pou Pou
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« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2014, 05:41:47 PM »

Jon,
Thank you very much.  My intuition was to start near the center, pretty much as you suggested. When I would tile floors with my Dad, the first thing he had me do was to find the "center" of the room (most rooms don't have simple geometries); then we would begin there.  Seems so natural, my Dad was very smart.  And thanks for the two links; just delightful reading.

Pou Pou
(My granddaughter's version of the Greek word for grandfather)
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Yak 52
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Jon Whitmore



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« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2014, 04:39:32 AM »

No problem.

Do you stick 'em down somehow, or do they have sufficient weight to stay put?

John, yes I generally pin the blocks in position on the board. They are not heavy enough to stay put so sometimes I put something heavy on top. The chief benefit is that you can make any jig you need  Smiley
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Pou Pou
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« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2014, 07:20:04 PM »

Jon,

I got some Legos and built the jigs as per your pictures... which were very helpful.  My question now is: how to proceed?  Do you suggest that I glue the lower struts of the box area first? Then the upper ones?  Or glue the uppers and lowers more-or-less simultaneously?

Many thanks in advance,
Pou Pou
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Yak 52
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Jon Whitmore



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« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2014, 04:06:38 AM »

Pou Pou,

I normally do the bottom ones first.

Cut the cross pieces very accurately to size, pin them in position on the plan (either side of the cross piece, not through it), add the glue and then use the 'jig' to clamp the sides in position. (I actually tape the sides to the lego in position first.)  The top crosspieces are harder to do because the lego doesn't have enough weight to put lateral pressure to clamp at the top of the block. Here I sometimes use masking tape to hold the blocks together.

It's a bit tricky to explain but I'm sure you will find a way that suits you.

Jon
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Pou Pou
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« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2014, 11:48:40 AM »

Jon,
Again, I say thanks.  The body is now complete and it looks reasonable.

Could I ask a really basic question?  How do you make clean, accurate, 90 degree cuts on things like 1/16 inch balsa strips?  What happens to me, almost always, is I manage to crush or collapse the strips rather than get clean cuts.  I did build a chopping block as described in Don Ross' book, but I clearly doing something wrong because I still get the crushing thing.  I use standard "x-acto"- type blades and I change them often.

Pou Pou
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wordguy
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« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2014, 12:08:40 PM »

It is akin to getting to Carnegie Hall:  Practice, practice, practice.

I use the 90 degree grid on my self-healing cutting mat as a guide (and for 30s and 45s, as well).  In my own building, I almost exclusively use a fragment of single-edged razor blade chucked in to an X-acto handle for slicing, while using a whole SE blade (or the fragment that remains after I've snapped off my "blade") as my "chopper."  And, in this case, "chopping" is a bit misleading; I tend to make a slicing motion rather than a chopping one, and as the pieces get thicker (say, 1/8" and up) I may make  several "slicing chops."

Hope that helps.
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As it is not at all likely that any means of suspending the effect of air-resistance can ever be devised, a flying-machine must always be slow and cumbersome. . . . But as a means of amusement, the idea of aerial travel has great promise.

— T. Baron Russell, 'A hundred Years Hence,' 1905
Yak 52
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Jon Whitmore



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« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2014, 05:04:53 AM »

Cut twice.
The first (oversize) cut will crush a bit but the second trimming cut (slicing motion) will not be half so bad. After a while you will get your eye in and the second cut will get close to square.
In fact you can have as many trimming cuts as needed as long as you start over long. If you start on the longest crosspiece and work toward the smallest, any you cut too short can still be used elsewhere and you will waste less wood.


Jon
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rick121x
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« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2014, 10:15:10 AM »

To Pou Pou:

Clean cuts with 1/16 balsa... I have pretty much given up using X-acto blades, for the blade is too thick and the blade angle is very wide.  For me, this results in less than accurate cuts and often slightly crushed.

My solution is to disassemble a two or three blade razor, and use those for my thin balsa work - as well as for trimming tissue covering.

I have been doing this for a few years now and wouldn't change a thing. Often, but not always - I add a length of masking tape to the top of the blades. They are much easier to pick up from the building board and also slightly easier to grip during cutting.

And at the price of six razors for a dollar at the "Ninety-nine Cents Store", the price is also just delightful!

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