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Author Topic: Guillows Cessna 180 converted to RC  (Read 1171 times)
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strongeagle
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« on: December 06, 2015, 09:20:57 PM »

This is my first RC conversion of a Guillows rubber kit, or any kit, for that matter.  I bought the kit off of ebay to build it free flight rubber power.  In the meantime, I acquired a Hobbyzone Champ (my first RC) and got a real kick out of flying it.  The old brain noted that there was lots of room inside the Cessna for a Spektrum AR6410L receiver, so, on a whim, I did some re-configuring to see if a motor and receiver would go inside.  It sat on my shelf for a long time, where I puzzled mostly about how to make the rudder and elevator work.  What to use for hinges?  What to use for push-rods?  Anyway, I dived back into it using some of my best model building tricks I picked up over the last 35 years and 'viola', there it sits ready to fly.  It weighs in with battery at just over 46g.  The Champ pushes 44g.  I used the kit wood and made the elevator and rudder work by 'sewing' hinges, an old control line trick.  The elevator and rudder horns are homemade 1/32 plywood, epoxied into place.

It's covered with kit paper glued on the old fashioned way with nitrate dope.  The craft seems a bit flimsy to me, but then, so does the Champ.  It hasn't flown yet, but it scoots across my basement floor in a hurry.  I already think it's a success.  If I get one flight out of it, that'll be a bonus.

Tom S.

http://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa377/lockheed188/Guillows%20Cessna%20180%202_zpspqtewfdk.jpghttp://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa377/lockheed188/Guillows%20Cessna%20180_zpskfbnzbd1.jpg
Guillows Cessna 180 converted to RC
Guillows Cessna 180 converted to RC
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Konrad
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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2015, 10:06:38 PM »

She looks real nice!

As she looks like she is close to the same weight as the Champ she should fly fine. I do like the added power and safety of this power upgrade with a GWS 5x4.3 prop (I think all you need is just the more powerful motor as the rest is the same as the stock Champ)
http://www.parkzone.com/Products/Default.aspx?ProdID=PKZ3624

Also what did you do for the landing gear?

All the best,
Konrad
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strongeagle
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2015, 12:22:07 AM »

Ahoy Konrad,

The motor from your hyperlink is the one I'm using. I had a heck of a time getting it into the Cessna and it's in there to stay!  When I initially built the fuselage, I fully intended to fly the model rubber power.  I used all of the kit parts including the formed landing gear wire and the balsa sandwich that holds it in place.  It wasn't until I mounted the motor and receiver that I realized the front-end structure wasn't going to do the job.....too light.  Also, the fuselage sides were very soft balsa and not too thick.  I ended up reinforcing most of the fuselage from the rear cabin bulkhead forward.  The insides aren't pretty because I doubled up a lot of the structure from the inside after it was already built using cyanoacrylate to stick it together.  Not a big fan of cyano, but it has its purposes.  I'm both pleased and amazed that it came out as light as it did.  I had the plane nearly complete last week and still didn't have any wheels for it, so I made a pair from balsa, added some paper hubs and a brass axle.  The kit wheels are terrible and don't look very good.  Although it's ready to fly now, its still missing wing struts and some kind of landing gear fairing (just to keep it semi-scale).  If my desire to fly exceeds my desire to make it look finished, it may go without the struts and fairings.

Here's a photo of the landing gear installation I took during early assembly when it was still going to be rubber powered.

Tom S.

http://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa377/lockheed188/landing%20gear_zps2ackykfw.jpg
Guillows Cessna 180 converted to RC
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Konrad
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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2015, 02:13:08 PM »

Greetings Tom,
You will love the added power from the SU-26XP motor. It is a much hotter wind than what came in the Champ. I also like the GWS prop over the PZ or E-flite props.

Looks like the landing gear is close to stock. I find that these R/C conversions really benefit from some rework of the landing gear. Have a look at some of my torsion bar style LG on your next conversion. They really help keep the structure intact on those early arrivals. Also they help keep the wheels pointed straight as the gear moves back and forth.

All the best,
Konrad
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strongeagle
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2015, 10:50:38 PM »

Ahoy Konrad,

Yes.  I appreciate the advice and enjoy reading your articles.  Your Curtiss P6E Hawk is a real charmer.....and I can see you've done some serious study of stick and tissue RC.

I've been sifting through my unbuilt kits trying to find one to make into my next RC.  This time I'm going to pay more attention to engineering the conversion....and you're right, landing gear can be a significant issue if not done right.  I know there are specially designed kits for this sort of thing, however, I'm a real sucker for Guillows kits, maybe a 400 series FW-190 or an A6M Zero or even an SE-5A.   My motto has always been, 'why do it the easy way, when you're already up to your elbows in the hard way?'   Good grief, the possibilities are endless.  You could spend a lifetime just turning Comet kits into RC.

I feel safe with the AR6410 receiver and the SU-26XP motor, however, I realize the kits I've mentioned above are right on the verge of the too-big-for-this-setup category.  My goal is to build them as light as possible so that I can continue to use the PZ receivers, servos, and battery.  I'll probably stick with them on my next build, whatever I finally choose.  I don't want to exceed the size of my building board or my small flying site.  I'm comfortable with wingspans in the 24 to 28 in range, but I feel the need for a bit more power which usually translates to a sturdier, heavier airframe.  This is going to need some more thought to get the right combination.  I'm at the bottom of the learning curve.
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Konrad
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« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2015, 10:58:36 AM »

Tom,
The Guillow 600 and 900 series are about the limit in size and weight for the single cell PZ power setup. While the 500 series is the correct size, they often build too heavy. The 400 series are fun but will need 2 cells and a motor that is close to the "180","250" size. And if you want fighter performance you will most likely need to go with a 3 cell setup.

Now if you want more selection I think the Dumas Walnut (17.5) scale models would be fun on your PZ power system. But I want to warn you, I wasn't happy with my P6-E even on 2cells and a 5 gram brushless motor until I did some work with the prop.

Have you seen this?
http://www.horizonhobby.com/radios/aircraft-receivers/ar6410lbl-dsmx-6ch-ultra-micro-receiver-with-brushless-esc-spmar6410lbl

It would make a great companion for some of the models you mentioned. It will give you a lot of flexibility in your power selection. And at the price looks to be a great value!

All the best,
Konrad
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strongeagle
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« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2015, 02:20:59 PM »

Ahoy Konrad,

Great heads-up.   I like it and think it would be a nifty upgrade....its listed at half the price of the AR6410L.  Greedy model builder that I am, I just ordered one.  It opens up a wider selection of motors.

Thank you Konrad.
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Konrad
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« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2015, 03:01:59 PM »

You thank me now, just you wait!  Shocked

All the best,
Konrad
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strongeagle
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« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2016, 10:08:08 AM »

Ahoy Konrad,

The motor from your hyperlink is the one I'm using. I had a heck of a time getting it into the Cessna and it's in there to stay!  When I initially built the fuselage, I fully intended to fly the model rubber power.  I used all of the kit parts including the formed landing gear wire and the balsa sandwich that holds it in place.  It wasn't until I mounted the motor and receiver that I realized the front-end structure wasn't going to do the job.....too light.  Also, the fuselage sides were very soft balsa and not too thick.  I ended up reinforcing most of the fuselage from the rear cabin bulkhead forward.  The insides aren't pretty because I doubled up a lot of the structure from the inside after it was already built using cyanoacrylate to stick it together.  Not a big fan of cyano, but it has its purposes.  I'm both pleased and amazed that it came out as light as it did.  I had the plane nearly complete last week and still didn't have any wheels for it, so I made a pair from balsa, added some paper hubs and a brass axle.  The kit wheels are terrible and don't look very good.  Although it's ready to fly now, its still missing wing struts and some kind of landing gear fairing (just to keep it semi-scale).  If my desire to fly exceeds my desire to make it look finished, it may go without the struts and fairings.

Here's a photo of the landing gear installation I took during early assembly when it was still going to be rubber powered.

Tom S.

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