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Author Topic: 35" Tiger Moth flight video  (Read 3028 times)
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Keith S
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« on: May 13, 2016, 03:45:42 PM »

Hi guys, I'm going to try to post a video of my little Tiger Moth. This is my second plane in over ten years; last year I built a peanut Gypsy Moth but this is my first outdoor-size "real" RC model in a long time. Many years ago I had a Goldberg "Electra" and a couple of foam ARF models, so this is a fairly advanced build for me, and my first balsa-and-tissue plane with actual R/C.

The tissue job is "OK", there aren't any wrinkles but in a couple of places the tissue has shrunk a bit more than anticipated and slightly warped the structure: couple of minor "waves" in the trailing edge and tips of the top wing. I modified the lower wing to include ailerons, and the trailing spar seems to have stiffened it enough at the tips that the tissue behaved itself. Oh well, it's not very noticeable, and the plane's flying characteristics are so pleasant that I am not going to try and fix any little minor finishing blemishes. I brushed up on my R/C piloting skills with an app on my iPad. I was surprised that it helped, plus I am a pilot in my working life so I suppose that helps too.

Anyway, here's the plane. I am very pleased and not a little surprised at how well it turned out. As with all my projects, I became a little less than fastidious towards the end and I feel a little like I lucked out with this pretty model.

https://youtu.be/i4DsrztY7uo
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DavidJP
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2016, 05:52:47 AM »

That will do very nicely. 

Reminds me of a chum who trained in Canada telling me that on doing dead sick or engine off landings if you were likely to undershoot then the dodge was to blip the throttle and say to the instructor "Just cleaning the plugs Sir".  Never had the nervei myself though.
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cd_webb
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2016, 08:49:10 AM »

I don't have video of mine, but if I did, my bet is that you wouldn't be able to tell which one you were watching except for the back ground. There's a lot of wood in them, but the wood quality and overall kit design will apparently produce a relaxing model every time.

Very nicely done, Keith! Pretty airplane. Smiley
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Keith S
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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2016, 12:23:49 PM »

That will do very nicely.  

Reminds me of a chum who trained in Canada telling me that on doing dead sick or engine off landings if you were likely to undershoot then the dodge was to blip the throttle and say to the instructor "Just cleaning the plugs Sir".  Never had the nervei myself though.

I am familiar with a variation on that trick- when I was learning to fly and practicing "forced approaches" we would be required to run the engine up every 1000 feet or so, to keep it from getting too cool. These little "warm ups" were sometimes longer than others, and I can't say they didn't help!

I don't have video of mine, but if I did, my bet is that you wouldn't be able to tell which one you were watching except for the back ground. There's a lot of wood in them, but the wood quality and overall kit design will apparently produce a relaxing model every time.

Very nicely done, Keith! Pretty airplane. Smiley

Thanks! I've seen lots of videos of the 44" version, but not too many of the 35" one. They do seem to produce pretty uniform results. I've another kit from this designer- the Dragon Rapide- which I am saving for next winter. He seems to have quite a following and his planes all seem to fly very well. Part of the credit must go to DeHavilland too- Tiger Moth models seem to always do well!
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marcin_pl
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2016, 06:25:09 AM »

Your plane has a very scale flying speed. I'm sure you were able to build it light. Small scale models are often built too heavy and overpowered so flying speed is enormous and absolutely not-to scale and not corresponding with a character of the prototype. One can see on youtube a lot of small scale Pipers, Storchs and others flying like Spitfires or rockets.
What is the total mass of your plane?

Marcin
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2016, 06:46:17 AM »

I agree with Marcin absolutely!  Almost all small RC planes fly far too fast for either comfort or realism, whereas yours is really lovely!

I've got a Parkzone 250 and all the RC gubbins out of a rather charmless ARTF Piper which I can't be motived to repair, and your Moth has inspired me to have a go at building something myself - which would be double satisfaction!

Would just have to be patient in waiting for calm days in these Windy Isles.  Grin

Jon
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Keith S
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« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2016, 12:41:32 PM »

Yeah, the problem is of course, you need almost no wind to get it to fly in a scale manner. It's windy here today, so no flying for me either.

I don't know what the plane weighs at the moment, but I am curious too, so I'm planning to take it to work, where we have a scale that can weigh small things. I will report back when I know the weight.

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Keith S
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« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2016, 01:50:20 AM »

Hi guys, I took the plane to work today and weighed it. It turned out to weigh 8.8 ounces with the 1300mAh battery.
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2016, 07:26:01 AM »

That sounds pretty light: 8.8 oz = 250g.

So, assuming an appropriate wing area of 336 sq in (2 x 35" span x 4.8" chord), this results in a wing loading of 0.75g per sq in (in old money this equates to about 3.8 oz per sq ft).

Given a target loading of say 0.4g per sq in for indoor scale rubber free flight, and maybe 0.6 for the equivalent outdoors, you're doing very well at 0.75 with proper electric RC!

Jon
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Keith S
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« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2016, 04:07:28 PM »

I think in grams too, but the manufacturer and designer speak in ounces in the plans. They're from the U.S.A. I find it a bit confusing. Pat Tritle, the designer, is known for his very lightweight airframes. I just tried to keep the glue blobs to a minimum, but there doesn't seem like it takes any special effort to build this kit to the target weight. The aileron servos account for about six grams, and I suppose the associated structure and long wires accounts for a bit more. My plane is about 22 grams heavier than Pat Tritle's prototype, but his has no ailerons and he's a master builder. Maybe doped tissue is a little heavier than the "Solite" he covers with, too.



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