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Author Topic: Dimescale Weight?  (Read 1284 times)
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High Point
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« on: June 16, 2008, 01:21:59 PM »

What would you say is a good all around target weight for an average Dimescale model? Also I would appreciate any tips on keeping the weight down. Thanks for any input at all.

Curtis
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Wout Moerman
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2008, 05:15:30 AM »

I would think 20 grams is about the maximum for a good flying dimer, 12 grams is very good and some builders make them even lighter. It depends also on which dimer, for instance is it a bipe or single wing? And are you going to fly outdoor or indoor?
A few tips to keep the weight down:
- keep the tail as light as possible
- don't use paint or colored dope as finish
- don't use plastic wheels
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Mooney
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2008, 12:13:39 PM »

Hi guys
I'm really not an expert, but I try to adhere to the .5g per 1sq. in. rule to keep any plane in the flying range.

Guys that are much better than me can do lighter and some can seemingly make a brick fly. I admire them.

Me, I struggle along. But that's the "yardstick" I use.

With the various designs in Dimescale, it's hard to say that you should weigh "X" grams for a dimer. (IMHO at least).

After all, with 1/16th construction throughout, you cannot expect a monoplane to weigh the same as a
bipe.

kevin
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faif2d
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2008, 10:06:20 PM »

The ones I have built have weighed from 9 grams to 18 grams. It all depends on the size and number of wings and all sorts of other variables. These were meant to be simple and bare bones models and that is the way I try to build them. I seldom use light sticks usually around 7-8 lb stuff. Any details I use 4 lb wood but I like to have substantial frames.
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High Point
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2008, 12:44:50 PM »

Thanks gentlemen for the tips; very useful information. I recently started on the B.A.T. Monoplane from a plan a friend gave me. It's been awhile since I've built anything recently except for a few gliders.

Curtis
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Dan G.
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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2008, 01:49:23 AM »

Curtis ... try determining which sticks really require strength. Some sticks are there mainly as spacers or fixers, like many cross pieces -- they can often be lighter. If there are more than the four basic longerons or stringers, they can be made lighter, although you risk deformation (starved horse syndrome).

... just can't over-emphasize the light tail moerman mentions, since it has to be balanced by (often) three or four times in nose weight.

Dan G.
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High Point
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« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2008, 03:11:11 PM »

Thanks Dan, I appreciate all the help...I saw these little planes doing 2 minutes plus at ETSU in the Mini- Dome at the meet in Johnson City, TN.

Curtis
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Duco Guru
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« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2008, 03:38:18 PM »

Curtis:

A good formula for any OUTDOOR rubber powered model is .5 grams per square inch of wing area. If your model has 50 square inches of wing area, an all up weight (including rubber) of 25 grams will produce a good flying model..

Guru
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