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Author Topic: Dizzyness  (Read 708 times)
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RECTOBLASTER
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« on: November 27, 2016, 03:28:55 PM »

At age 16 I was a half competent control line pilot, capable of a few aerobatic moves. Yesterday, I flew a "Peacemaker" (with a deliberately restricted elevator movement) and managed three level flights without incident. However, time has passed by - I am now 72. After each flight, I was completely disorientated and had to compose myself before attempting the next. Can anyone suggest a way of countering dizziness, or should I just give up and stick to free flight? 
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billdennis747
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« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2016, 03:49:21 PM »

If you google 'control line dizziness' you will find some answers
I don't think it's an age thing

"Getting dizzy while flying can be a problem, but after a few flights you will not get dizzy anymore. The smaller airplanes will tend to go around faster than the big ones (since the line lengths are shorter). In any case, you will usually get dizzy after the flight rather than while you are actually flying, since you are concentrating on your airplane rather than on the surroundings. To handle post-flight vertigo, after the flight is over, stand in the middle of the circle with your eyes shut. The world will seem to go around in the other direction, but the nausea and vertigo will disappear. When the world stops spinning, you can again open your eyes."
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old4570
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« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2016, 06:54:50 PM »

Yeah ! 

 Just got to pace yourself ...
I found doing maneuvers like figure 8's or loops , or adding a little inverted flying ..

 I found flying half a circle helped a lot ..  Just stay down wind ..

So big half circle 8's , or just fly normal for half a lap then go inverted for half a lap and then normal again .. 
A nice variety of maneuvers in that half lap ..

And every now and again do full laps ..
As soon as you feel the dizzy come on go back to half laps .. 
And maneuvers .. 
You really want a relatively slow - stable - yet nimble plane ..  Like a combat wing .. 
I had a Voodoo with any of half a dozen 2.5cc Diesel motors pulling it around ..  Was not too fast , pulled well on the lines , was stable ( could fly it eyes shut ) and it could turn tight .   
That Voodoo was 100% fun ..   

Maybe the other option is to fly till you get dizzy then hand it to some one else ( Can be a little tricky swapping handles in flight ) ...
We used to swap pilots a lot back in the day ( Give some one a go on your model mid flight )
Probably not for Noobs ... 

 Or just use a smaller fuel tank for shorter flight times ..
4 to 5 minutes of spinning around is probably enough to make anyone dizzy ..
Perhaps limit yourself to 2 minute flights ..

 I still actually remember how sick I got when I first started ..
2 or 3 flights , and I was toast for the rest of the day ( Nausea ) .. I actually suffer from motion sickness ..
So C/L for me in the beginning was a little like waterboarding ...  ( Torture )
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danberry
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« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2016, 12:04:59 AM »

Quit flyin' in circles!
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LOUCRANE
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« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2016, 01:17:43 AM »

Sometimes the 'wobble' of walking backwards in a circle can disorient you. Managing your feet can become a distraction. Art Adamisin recommended a little practice before - long before! - flying (your buddies might think you strange...)

What to practice? Get used to placing the next toe behind the heel of the 'rear' foot as you turn. It becomes a predictable and natural reaction, and flips over - as I did after crossing from the Continent to England on a visit. (Assigned in Germany; took family with me on leave to visit the 1978 FAI CL WC at RAF Woodvale (Eastport). Only confusion came from my (left hand drive) elbows in the gutter, not the 'centre' of the roadway. Made overtaking chancy...)

As many returning CL fliers have noticed, we never forget - as with a bicycle - BUT we do forget how wobbly and how tiring it can be until the 'natural' ease returns.

As I approach 77 years on this planet, I still enjoy CL flight, for so many reasons...  Now, enjoy!!

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/LOU
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« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2016, 06:34:16 AM »

If you get dizzy when you return to CL after a long lay-off, the only real cure is to do a lot of flying with a slowish model. Also, as has already been suggested, do a series of lazy-8's. A friend of mine came back to CL recently and he usually falls over after the model lands, but he's getting over it slowly and now flies a something slower than the Oliver combat model he began with. What I've noticed flying big stunters is that the older I get the harder it is to look upwards when doing wingovers or overhead 8's. I'm not the only flyer in our club who's noticed this. And it's not just when we fly CL, either. It's something to do with the gradual wearing-out of what in the inner ear controls balance, or so I've been told. All very complicated but depressingly age-related. This also occasionally manifests itself after flying a few level laps then doing consecutive loops or bunts - my eyes know where they should be looking, but my body wants to keep on walking round! Another reason why I've recently taken up indoor......

G
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RECTOBLASTER
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« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2016, 01:31:27 PM »

Many thanks to all who offered advice. I will stick with it, and hope that it wears off.
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faif2d
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« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2016, 02:12:07 PM »

I agree that lazy eights are a lifesaver.  The last time I flew CL it was with a 1/2A combat model on 35 ft lines with a very good Tee Dee.  I was doing ok for awhile and had to resort to lazy eights a few times but then I got cocky and tried to do something new and the thing hit the ground behind me and I had no idea how it got there or what I had done to get it there.  I had not flown for a few years but used to fly without thinking about what I was doing.  That was about 7 years ago and I haven't flown since.  I even designed a new 1/2A combat plane and built 4 of them but have never flown any of them.  I even set up a place to fly by myself and never used it.  I mowed the grass for 2 years but not since then. 
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I used to like painting with dope but now I can't remember why!    Steve Fauble
Big G
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« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2016, 03:22:45 PM »

With reference to my Post #5 above. Yesterday I went flying indoor (it makes a change from big stunters and it's also warmer at this time of year) and my model hung up in the rafters of the sports hall we use. It couldn't be seen from floor level, and for quite a long time I stood looking vertically upwards. Initially I got dizzy, as I expected to, but after a few minutes it wore off.....I wonder if this might be the cure for dizziness doing overhead manoevres with a CL stunter? The guy who was with me also admitted to getting dizzy when looking straight upwards, so it ain't just me.

And I just remembered something from years and years ago - don't pivot on one foot when flying CL solo - walk around, as you would when flying team race. This also helps in reducing dizziness.

G

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