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Author Topic: Douglas World Cruiser  (Read 9340 times)
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ZK-AUD
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« Reply #25 on: January 08, 2018, 06:19:29 PM »



ZK-AUD all the louvers on the Mailplane always stopped me.

Great case for vac-formed 5 thou styrene panels!
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OZPAF
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« Reply #26 on: January 08, 2018, 06:24:42 PM »

Fine work Tim - the wing looks impressive and the fuselage is very clean and neat.

John
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RolandD6
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« Reply #27 on: January 08, 2018, 06:59:09 PM »

Very nice structure. I used a similar structure on my first bostonian wing. It is very stable and is years old. Have built another similar wing using much thinner wood, not yet covered.

Paul
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Rudder flutter
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« Reply #28 on: January 09, 2018, 06:12:49 AM »

Those bones are beautiful Tim. The structure looks both impressively complex, but light too. Even if you don't have it ready by the Nats, it would be lovely to see it 'in flesh', on the day.
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Richard Crossley
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« Reply #29 on: January 09, 2018, 10:12:27 AM »

It's absolutely magnificent.
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danmellor
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« Reply #30 on: January 09, 2018, 05:12:22 PM »

I second that. Can't wait to see it in the flesh.

Dan.
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Monz
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« Reply #31 on: January 09, 2018, 05:25:47 PM »

That really is looking great Tim, look forward to seeing some more.
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Graham Banham
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« Reply #32 on: January 09, 2018, 06:14:44 PM »

Looks great Tim: what are your thoughts regarding additional dihedral over scale?
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Work In Progress
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« Reply #33 on: January 10, 2018, 06:55:02 AM »

I think he said one degree over scale? Which is not really going to stand out visually.
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Tim Horne
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« Reply #34 on: January 10, 2018, 03:10:19 PM »

Thank you all for the kind words. No progress to report, Too tired Grin.

Flydean, Thanks for pointing out my poor punctuation and grammar in a humorous response Grin. I never was much good at English in school. The question should heave been worded; Does anyone know if the DWC "New Orleans" is still in the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson AFB? The reason for asking was because I was not sure whether it was a temporary display that would move on to somewhere else or if it is a permanent exhibit. As always when building a model I would love to be able to go and have a look at the real thing. Smiley

Graham, I'm not sure whether you mean how am I going to handle the dihedral setting, or what is my feeling about upping dihedral on models?
As WIP says; the scale dihedral is 2deg which I have upped to 3. This gives 18mm under the last full rib. My feeling about dihedral is that I personally dislike seeing scale models with grossly exaggerated dihedral and I would prefer to use scale. However I recognise that some increase can be helpful, and some models I have made with flat wings have been tricky to trim and also end up with saggy looking wings. I reckon the extra degree will be barely noticeable and will help to reduce sag.

Tim
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Graham Banham
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« Reply #35 on: January 10, 2018, 04:19:01 PM »

Hi Tim,

I meant what have you built into the DWC, which if i had read your earlier posts properly i would already know! I agree about excessive dihedral detracting from a model: good thing about your World Cruiser is that as it’s large, a small angular increase in dihedral will raise the tips to an effective extent without being too noticeable.

In any case, this is looking superb! Well done: looking forward to more progress reports.
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flydean1
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« Reply #36 on: January 10, 2018, 08:55:25 PM »

Regarding the DWC at AF Museum:  I think the museum's web site lists exhibits.
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #37 on: January 26, 2018, 11:18:11 AM »

Tim, I came across this film footage whilst looking for something else. You've probably found it already, but just in case...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ScbWl6zomaw

and

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFrxpSnXbrU
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Tim Horne
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« Reply #38 on: January 28, 2018, 07:21:38 PM »

Thanks for those Pete, no I hadn't found them and they are both good informative films. It's really interesting watching them all have a picnic; if you could lip read it would be nice to know what the chit chat in such an informal occasion was all about.

The most useful section for me is the work on swapping the pontoons and wheels over as it clearly shows the sprung undercarriage workings. I am going to try to reproduce this as it's quite simple but I couldn't tell what it really looked like from my photos.

Not very much progress to report. I made a tailplane which was way too heavy so I have started another. Also done some formers for the slight curve of the fuse underside and made a start on the curved blocks to shape the nose.

I will definitely not get this finished for April so the next target is Nijmegen in Nov; a little more realistic Grin.
Tim
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Tim Horne
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« Reply #39 on: February 12, 2018, 07:49:49 PM »

A little more progress to report.

The nose of the DWC is a bit different from most "normal" aircraft with a radiator plonked on the front! This is the method I ended up with.

First the easy bit, Various blocks to carve and sand to form the rounded nose. I am using one of Derek Knight's adjustable nose blocks but without the mounting flange. The DWC nose is quite pointed and the flange is too wide.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Douglas World Cruiser
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Tim Horne
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« Reply #40 on: February 12, 2018, 08:08:34 PM »

Next is the radiator. As well as having wheels or floats options the DWC also had a "standard" or "tropical" radiator (tropical being wider). I would have preferred to use the standard size but the photos I have from the museum show the "New Orleans" with the tropical radiator fitted so I am going to match that.

As it is further forward than anything except the prop I have made it as a noseweight box. It's made of 1/32 and 1/64 ply so it is a bit heavy on its own but the top is a lid so I can fill it with lead!

It's an odd shape as it fits around the prop driveshaft. I carved the noseblock to fit.
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Tim Horne
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« Reply #41 on: February 12, 2018, 08:20:50 PM »

Next was to make a support for the top of the radiator and also for the engine cowl panels which come up to the top of the rad. I made a front former to sit behind the rad, some stringers to support the panel and then put two sets of magnets into the rad to hold it on independently of everything else.

Last was to make the engine cowl panel with its 44 louvrers. I made this out of plasticard so that I could press out the louvrers. They are a bit uneven but that is the third attempt and I couldn't face doing it yet again! It won't be fixed until there is a dummy engine inside.

Tim
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skycafe
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« Reply #42 on: February 12, 2018, 08:53:25 PM »

very cool so far-what is 'plasticard?'
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billdennis747
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« Reply #43 on: February 13, 2018, 02:48:22 AM »

It looks great Tim. Next time you might consider using litho plate which you can etch as thin as you like with caustic soda. You can bend the shape of the louvres with a tool and of course the edges are very fine. And if you weather the edges, it's metal!
Skycafe - plasticard is just thin white polystyrene (?) card  in different thicknesses. Essential stuff. Maybe you know it by a different name.
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #44 on: February 13, 2018, 05:16:44 AM »

Great work, Tim.  Very impressed with ingenious radiator weight box!
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FreeFlightModeller
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« Reply #45 on: February 13, 2018, 05:27:24 AM »

Looking great, Tim  Smiley
Starting front the last post photo and working back, I did wonder what I was looking at ... ingenious as Pete says.
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DavidJP
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« Reply #46 on: February 13, 2018, 08:28:02 AM »

Very enviable piece of work - or rather pieces of work!  And a lot of challenging detail all over - louvres, stitching, panel work the rad....... gosh.  You clearly have a lot of stamina apart from several skills.
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Indoorflyer
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« Reply #47 on: February 13, 2018, 09:01:03 AM »

Nice project underway, Tim.  As the original flight occurred during an April-Sept time frame, you could still commemorate the event with a maiden flight this fall!

Not sure that "New Orleans" is still on display @ The National Museum of the USAF. It was on loan there, and was to return to the West coast for eventual display at the latest reincarnation of the Douglas Museum, (now the "Museum of Flying") in Santa Monica, California.
"Chicago" is in the Smithsonian/National Air and Space Museum.

Edit:  received email from Dan Ryan at the Museum of Flying, stating "The World Cruiser "New Orleans" is the property of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.  It is currently disassembled and in storage.  They have plans to conserve it and display it sometime in the future.  For more information contact that Museum".
« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 10:21:30 AM by Indoorflyer » Logged

Make the same mistake on both sides; nobody will notice...
Tim Horne
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« Reply #48 on: February 14, 2018, 07:49:55 PM »

Thanks all Smiley. I am try to keep the build ticking on even though I don't have lots of time. I don't want it to turn into another two or three year project!

Bill, thanks for the reminder about litho plate. I do have some but it's been so long since I used any that I had forgotten it was there. Can you explain about the caustic soda treatment please? I remember you explaining about it on another thread but a search didn't find it and I can't remember what you said. Just an idea of dilution rates and what sort of time it needs. How thin can you let it get before it starts getting holes? I might well do the panel again if I get a good result.

Indoorflyer, thanks for that information. I assumed it had been moved because the web site for the Airforce museum did't mention the DWC.

Tim
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billdennis747
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« Reply #49 on: February 15, 2018, 03:18:12 AM »

Tim, I can't remember where it was either but it may have been in Aeromodeller. I'll look a bit later.
Briefly, strong solution of caustic soda in plastic tub, outside, latex gloves, preferably goggles, tweezers, separate tub of water to dip in.
Put the sheet in and agitate and turn over while it fizzes. Take it out out occasionally, dip in water and check. Keep going until it's as thin as you want. Don't get distracted, it will disappear altogether and that's too thin.
If you look at some of Terry Manley's models from the 70s (FK8, Vimy, Blackburn Swift, Sprat) the beautiful metalwork was done like this

I've got a scrap here which is as thin as paper and it doesn't go into holes. It's 11sq in and 1.5g. If you PM me your address I'll send it to you to play with
Bill
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