Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin  |  Contact Global Moderator
July 13, 2020, 07:34:08 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado  (Read 7055 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« on: March 20, 2018, 05:46:20 AM »

I thought you might like to see my latest project that I kicked off a few days ago.
I was inspired at the recent Peterborough indoor event by Graham Banham's super little Peanut Fike model flying with an Atomic Workshop Zombie and Voodoo 10 motor. This model is very realistic, and parades about very slowly and gently.

These little motor units are direct drive, and swing a tiny 65mm prop at high revs, they weigh 3.4g each, so I reckon they should be ideal for multi-engined models.

I love the look of the Consolidated Coronado. It has four engines, and a nice big wing area. The proportions look pretty good to me, and the high wing and deep hull should help with stability. With electric FF models, I generally think the model can weigh up to double the total thrust of the motor(s), so as the Voodoo 10 gives 10g of thrust (x4), I can't go over 80g all up weight. I have my sights on a much lower weight than this though, so this model is being built simple, in a kind of 'dime scale' style, with slow realistic flight being the aim.

Span is 31 inches. Progress so far is just the wings, and I was really chuffed that the weight came in at just 6.8g for the pair in the photo. I used really light wood for everything except the spars and TE.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Logged

Richard Crossley
DHnut
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 18
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 786



Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2018, 06:06:20 AM »

Richard,
           That is impressive. Is this for a large indoor site? I have always admired your large multi engined models and this clearly follows in that vein. What size battery and are you using voodo controllers?
   Ricky
Logged
Pete Fardell
Palladium Member
********

Kudos: 150
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 5,743




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2018, 06:15:58 AM »

This will be great!
(And it's quite strange that no one else has been inspired to build a 31" Coronado after watching a peanut Fike.)
Logged
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2018, 07:39:26 AM »

Richard,
           That is impressive. Is this for a large indoor site? I have always admired your large multi engined models and this clearly follows in that vein. What size battery and are you using voodo controllers?
   Ricky
I've not built a 'multi' for a while Ricky. Yes, the engines will be controlled by a single Zombie controller. I'll get my brother (Jonathan - Mr Atomic Workshop) to wire everything up for me with separate plugs on each motor and correct wire lengths etc. as I'm a bit rubbish with electrics. I think the cell will be a single 200MaH Lipo.
Logged

Richard Crossley
MKelly
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 103
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,017




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2018, 09:42:17 AM »

Great build - I have a soft spot for seaplanes and a desire to someday do an electric FF multi-engine model.  I wish you success with the model - I'm really looking forward to following along.

Cheers,

Mike
Logged
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2018, 09:56:55 AM »

This will be great!
(And it's quite strange that no one else has been inspired to build a 31" Coronado after watching a peanut Fike.)
Hmmm, I can't think why nobody else has made the obvious progression from Fike to Coronado.
Logged

Richard Crossley
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2018, 10:00:52 AM »

Great build - I have a soft spot for seaplanes and a desire to someday do an electric FF multi-engine model.  I wish you success with the model - I'm really looking forward to following along.

Cheers,

Mike

I did look around for a few prototypes that seemed like stable fliers, but so many 'multis' are low wingers. Seaplanes however often have the wings set high to keep the props away from the water, they also don't have any wheels to complicate matters. In the case of the Coronado, the wing floats even retract into the tips, so no dangly bits at all are needed.
Logged

Richard Crossley
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2018, 10:30:12 AM »

Latest pics of Coronado progress. She's coming together quite quickly. Next stage is adding formers to the upper fuselage and then stringering. Really pleased with the weight at 10.6g for airframe so far as she's quite big at 31" span. I'm thinking of building a semi-hidden clear wheel into the keel and using a couple of thin wire 'whiskers' to hold the wings straight on take off and landing. A fly-off dolly is another method, but the idea with the wheel is that hopefully she will roll-out nicely after touch down.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Logged

Richard Crossley
billdennis747
Palladium Member
********

Kudos: 62
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 4,104



Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2018, 11:46:21 AM »

Hello Richard
I think the rules allow for such a wheel to be removable (check this). With a short straight-through wire axle sticking out either side, it could fit into a slot with buried tiny magnets. Cover the slot with painted tape
Bill
Logged
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2018, 03:21:57 PM »

Hello Richard
I think the rules allow for such a wheel to be removable (check this). With a short straight-through wire axle sticking out either side, it could fit into a slot with buried tiny magnets. Cover the slot with painted tape
Bill

Thanks Bill, I looked, and BMFA rules state:

6.1.1.19 Take-off aids
All models shall become airborne in the manner of their prototype.
Models of seaplanes, in all classes, may use wheels or wheeled dollies for take-off in
the absence of suitable water surface conditions. Deviation from scale, through inclusion
of permanently-attached wheels, skids or similar non prototype devices in the model
structures shall, in this case, be disregarded during static judging.
Logged

Richard Crossley
billdennis747
Palladium Member
********

Kudos: 62
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 4,104



Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2018, 03:28:10 PM »

Hi Richard
If you wanted to go down the detachable route, I think a clarification from the STC would be received favourably but the only reason to do it is to please yourself, since it is disregarded anyway.
Bill
Logged
DavidJP
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 47
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,000




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2018, 04:25:46 PM »

That looks very light Richard so your target seems realistic.  My hunch would be the wheel with whisk as unless weight goes against you so the drop off dolly might be better.  I can’t help thinking the wheel and whisk as would work better overall. Seaplanes are the tops.
Logged
tom arnold
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 31
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 713


Casper Wyoming



Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2018, 08:45:41 PM »

I am enjoying this build in more ways than one. As a long time resident of the San Diego area, I immediately recognized the building behind  the trailing edge of the wing in the first photos. I got a traffic ticket parked in front of it! Totally unfair too. Now F-18s follow that flight path as well as hives of helicopters. We lived in the town of Coronado (out of the picture across the bay) and I well remember the P5M Marlins taking off in the bay.
Logged
Hepcat
OOS, January 2019
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 279
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 1,777



Ignore
« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2018, 10:42:39 PM »

I must be getting old, or something, I have never heard a Flying Boat called a seaplane before.  However I must say that the 'fishbones' are very attractive. I keep looking back at them. I guess your wood supplier must be a closely guarded secret.
John
Logged

John Barker UK - Will be missed by all that knew him.
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2018, 05:03:58 AM »

I am enjoying this build in more ways than one. As a long time resident of the San Diego area, I immediately recognized the building behind  the trailing edge of the wing in the first photos. I got a traffic ticket parked in front of it! Totally unfair too. Now F-18s follow that flight path as well as hives of helicopters. We lived in the town of Coronado (out of the picture across the bay) and I well remember the P5M Marlins taking off in the bay.
Interesting Tom. I must admit that I'd not really thought about this aircrafts name too much, or even related it to 'Coronado Island', San Diego. Were Consolidated based in the area, or did they just choose the name as it was a seaside located town. I guess there must have been a seaplane base in the area?
Logged

Richard Crossley
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2018, 05:19:34 AM »

I must be getting old, or something, I have never heard a Flying Boat called a seaplane before.  However I must say that the 'fishbones' are very attractive. I keep looking back at them. I guess your wood supplier must be a closely guarded secret.
John


I may be wrong but I thought the term 'Flying Boat' related to these big old single hull aircraft, and 'Seaplane' related to smaller aircraft, usually with twin floats (DH Beaver etc) Although I guess 'Seaplane' seems like a suitable general term.

No secrets with the wood. Its a mix of standard model shop stock that I buy from Langleys or Pegasus models in Norwich, and then stuff I've ordered online from Balsa Cabin. Balsa Cabin are great as they select for you from superb quality stock. I always strip my own 1/16" sq, straight of the sheet with a steel rule and scalpel. Its not always exactly 1/16" but it makes no difference. The benefit of this is that you can get the perfect strength for each part of the job depending on which part of the sheet you cut from as they often vary in density from one side of the sheet to the other. My main challenge seems to be how light can I make the stringers without them 'starving' once covered and shrunk with tissue!
Logged

Richard Crossley
DavidJP
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 47
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,000




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2018, 06:19:55 AM »

My error John - should have said flying boat - post pension book syndrome!

Slec seem also to be producing some good balsa now Richard but they are rather nearer myself than you of course.  Only 20mins for me.  We are quite lucky really.  Pegasus, Langley and their range of paints etc. Mike Woodhouse and SLEC - even Balsa Cabin if you fancy making a day of it and like Barges and pubs. Not forgetting that chap with the motors and other electric goodies of course!

I wonder if we could persuade the people at Peterborough to install  large paddling pool for a morning  ......?
Logged
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2018, 12:19:07 PM »

Got the upper decking done last night, and started the 'steps' on the hull. The thicker looking ribs half way out on the wing are actually 2 ribs, this is where I'll make the wings removable via either tongues and boxes or tubes.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Logged

Richard Crossley
jdincau
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 12




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2018, 12:26:21 PM »

Interesting Tom. I must admit that I'd not really thought about this aircrafts name too much, or even related it to 'Coronado Island', San Diego. Were Consolidated based in the area, or did they just choose the name as it was a seaside located town. I guess there must have been a seaplane base in the area?
Consolidated then Consolidated-Vultee then Convair was based in San Diego where there was a large U.S. Navy seaplane base
Logged

"We can never select the one result we want to the exclusion of all others"
David Pye
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2018, 03:52:52 PM »

Interesting Tom. I must admit that I'd not really thought about this aircrafts name too much, or even related it to 'Coronado Island', San Diego. Were Consolidated based in the area, or did they just choose the name as it was a seaside located town. I guess there must have been a seaplane base in the area?
Consolidated then Consolidated-Vultee then Convair was based in San Diego where there was a large U.S. Navy seaplane base

Cool, thanks for that info.
Logged

Richard Crossley
g_kandylakis
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 49
Offline Offline

Greece Greece

Posts: 711




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2018, 09:00:20 AM »

Nice and unusual choice, Richard!

Going for the fattest model of the competition?  Grin

No doubt you have seen this...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QyIV_Cvcv4

Will be watching with interest as you transform balsa sticks to all those curved surfaces with all your tricks.  Smiley

And last, in order to save me searching time, what is the equivalent soviet flying boat that Peter Smart is bulding paralle to yours? I do not imagine he will break the tradition...

Greetings,

George
Logged

scale free flight & micro RC
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2018, 03:50:51 AM »

Nice and unusual choice, Richard!

Going for the fattest model of the competition?  Grin

No doubt you have seen this...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QyIV_Cvcv4

Will be watching with interest as you transform balsa sticks to all those curved surfaces with all your tricks.  Smiley

And last, in order to save me searching time, what is the equivalent soviet flying boat that Peter Smart is bulding paralle to yours? I do not imagine he will break the tradition...

Greetings,

George
Thanks George. It is a little tubby isn't it?
This model is going to be a celebration of 'stick and tissue', so most of the curves are going to be stringered. There will be a few bits of hollowed block balsa here an there, but the general feel will be of a simplified Coronado. Its not going to get a high static mark in a competition, but it should have a lot of charisma, and hopefully it will fly nice and slowly. Thanks for the link to the youtube video - that thing certainly takes off quickly n the footage - must have been lightly loaded in that clip.
Logged

Richard Crossley
piecost
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 9
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 488



Ignore
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2018, 12:24:03 PM »

I enjoy seeing the details that you add to your models and must ask: Will you be adding a scale anchor?
Logged
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2018, 12:45:25 PM »

I enjoy seeing the details that you add to your models and must ask: Will you be adding a scale anchor?
Chortle ... - thinking about it, I wonder if it has an anchor?
Logged

Richard Crossley
Rudder flutter
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 126
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 192

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #24 on: March 26, 2018, 12:50:53 PM »

I spent a few hours over the weekend completing the fuselage of the PB2Y-2. Its funny, the basic fuselage structure went together very quickly, but completing all the little bits seemed to take a long time. A few pics attached. I will have a magnet-attached hatch at the front so I can get to the cell or Zombie (not sure what will go here yet, depends on balance). The 'step' on the underside of the hull was tricky, but came out OK. I was quite pleased also with the very light balsa block that I hollowed from both sides to make the fairing in front of the tailplane. More soon
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Re: Consolidated PB2Y-2 Coronado
Logged

Richard Crossley
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!