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Author Topic: Keil Kraft Stinson Flying Station Wagon  (Read 3640 times)
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ZK-AUD
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« Reply #100 on: April 09, 2019, 07:04:04 PM »

Some may recall that I built the KeilKraft 16" Camel a couple of years ago (against all the usual dire predictions) and it turned out to be one of my most successful flyers ever.  I fully endorse all of the suggestions made in this case.  The S-hook loose bobbin, braided motor, thrust bearing and one of several variations of my patent free-wheel device are features of all of my rubber scale models.  Above all else I endorse the 'light is right' concept.  

There are so many tricks you can use to build light and all it takes is a bit of thought and planning.  I won't go into it here but just as an example I spent last night weighing lengths of 3/32 square for longerons on the big Lysander.  They all came off the same sheet and they all felt roughly the same strength and weight in my insensitive hands.

The scales showed a different story - weights ranged between 1g and 1.65g  - Hmmm which ones did I choose?
 
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Yak 52
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« Reply #101 on: April 10, 2019, 05:35:54 AM »

It's worth looking up Stephen (Prosper's) experiments with long motors in short spaces. Some of his pendulum trials had limited internal space as I recall.
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Crabby
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« Reply #102 on: April 10, 2019, 10:16:40 AM »

I'm always making the compromise between light and hard.
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #103 on: April 10, 2019, 03:23:02 PM »

So, for the bobbin or wobbly-hook, would a length of aluminium tube (long enough for loose fit inside the fuselage) as a loose-sleeve over the normal aluminium peg-tube work?  Would it need a flange at either end to stop the rubber slipping off the end and jamming?

(Sorry Andy for the thread-jack... its just that this is where the conversation seems to be at present.)
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tom arnold
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« Reply #104 on: April 10, 2019, 05:05:35 PM »

In my experience, I have not needed a flange at the ends of the outer moveable tube but I do take a tiny orthodontic rubber band and cinch the motor up  tight against the moveable outer tube and it seems to stay just fine. Other guys do put a flange as well as the orthodontic rubber----sort of a belt and suspenders approach but I am just lazy.
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Pete Fardell
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« Reply #105 on: April 10, 2019, 06:11:19 PM »

So, for the bobbin... would a length of aluminium tube (long enough for loose fit inside the fuselage) as a loose-sleeve over the normal aluminium peg-tube work?
Yes it works, and no, no flange needed in my experience either. Like Tom, I use a small laccy band to keep the motor tightish up to the tube. As a bonus, if you then run a thin rod through the little rubber band it makes a handy stick for installing the motor without the need for a proper stuffing stick.  On larger outdoor models my outer tubes are mostly made from any bit of plastic tubing to hand (eg. butchered ball point pens) although I also have some flanged bobbins Bill gave me ages ago.
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