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Author Topic: Help With Materials list for f1L/EZB  (Read 291 times)
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ZoranD
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« on: March 17, 2019, 04:54:18 PM »

Hey Guys, I am interested in getting to EZB/F1L, however I am getting frustrated with getting a cohesive materials list. I have looked through the hobby shopper ezb article and while it was helpful, it does not have a dedicated list.

Can someone make a list of the size and density of wood I should get to get me started on making these models? It would also be helpful to list any necessary tools (I have a Balsa stripper and blades)
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Olbill
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« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2019, 10:34:59 PM »

The materials for EZB and F1L are completely different. Which are you interested in?
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ZoranD
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« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2019, 02:52:48 AM »

EZB I would say
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cglynn
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« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2019, 02:40:37 PM »

I would get a sheet of 1/32", 1/16", 3/32", and 1/8" balsa from your local hobby shop or craft store.  Bring a scale with you if you have one so you can weigh the sheets before you purchase them.  There are some charts out there that tell you the average density of the sheet based on its weight.  If you don't have a scale, look for the wood that is of the lightest color with the fewest dark streaks when held up to a bright light.

With those 4 sheets of wood, you could build almost any indoor model you can think of.  The 1/32" can be stripped for spars, sanded and sliced for ribs, and it can even be sanded to .008" or so for prop blanks.  Sure, it takes time, but it can be done.  The 1/16" can be used for spars for all sorts of models, while the 3/32 and 1/8 stuff can be used for motor sticks.

When using hobby shop wood for indoor models, a digital scale that measures down to mg, a sanding block with some 180 on one side and 220 on the other, a digital caliper, and little bit of patience will be your best friends.

If you are interested in the hobby shopper EZB, your best bet is to build EVERY jig that Coslick describes, perform EVERY test on your stick/spars, and do EVERYTHING in the article EXACTLY as he wrote.  When it comes to EZB's, Larry Coslick knows his stuff.  You will be very wise to follow his directions to a T.  Don't try to reinvent the EZB yet.  Build a few hobby shoppers exactly to his specs.  If you take the time to do that, you will have a very nice flying model that weighs around 600-700mg.  Once you get the hang of that, build his Akron Light or Micro B, EXACTLY to his specs.  Once you get the hang of that, I would recommend Kang's BS6 EZB, EXACTLY to his specs.  It too is a great flying model.

To build a good flying, light EZB is a challenge.  Don't make it any more involved by trying to reinvent the wheel.  The published and proven designs by Coslick and Kang are very hard to beat.  Yes, it takes some effort to faithfully reproduce their designs, but your efforts will pay off in the form of models that fly well and put up good times. 

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