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Author Topic: Silk over Tissue Covering  (Read 263 times)
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luthierdan
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« on: April 04, 2019, 05:42:31 PM »

Has anyone heard of or have experience with applying light weight silk over Japanese Tissue? I want to cover small, 38” to 48” span r/c assist, diesel powered models with a lightweight covering more durable than tissue alone. I am not a fan of plastic coverings. Polyspan or Silkspan is a possibility but can get heavy. Some of the possible advantages of applying silk over tissue may be increased covering strength, ease of application of silk alone, and less dope used to fill weave of silk. One of the problems I have experienced in the past with covering models with Esaki light weight silk is the covering ends up not as taught after doping as when first applied.
 
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ZK-AUD
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« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2019, 09:58:12 PM »

I've done this a lot and it's my go-to for large vintage models.  Advantages are all as you describe and it avoids the
inexplicable permanent loosening that sometimes happens.  My method is to tissue cover and dope well.  Apply the silk wet.  Squeezed out but still pretty wet.  The wet silk will adhere and you can get it straight and evenly tight.  Then dope through the wet silk and stick down the edges and bottoms of ribs on an undercambered  wing Let it dry and then dope again everywhere.
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dputt7
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2019, 10:41:32 PM »

   I used to cover my 1/12th scale WW1 models with silk over tissue, same process as Mike uses except I used the silk dry and flooded it with thinners, I found this easier for me as I don't cover with wet tissue either. I also liked the texture of the silk, as I only used a couple of thin coats to seal it, it had a more realistic look, probably not an issue with your models.
    
     I now use Polyspan, it is lighter and easier to repair if necessary.  It also can be used under printed tissue if required.
     Photo shows printed tissue over Polyspan.
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Re: Silk over Tissue Covering
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billdennis747
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« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2019, 02:05:39 AM »

In the UK we have settled on this method:
cover with Japanese tissue then two coats non-shrinking dope
cut the silk to size and steam iron. I use Esaki but you can track down other silks just as good and light
Esaki comes with a starch finish - I used to wash it and iron but no more - no need, and it keeps the warp and weft straight. Wet silk is a pain
Lay it on the wing and arrange
Mix up a bowl of wallpaper paste and brush a stripe of paste through the dry silk, spanwise at mid-chord. This helps stop it moving about
Brush the rest chordwise
It will go floppy and look horrid. Don't bother brushing the paste smooth - there's little substance to it and the water evaporates
Let it dry, trim edges, repeat for other side
Finish doping
Marvel at the results
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 02:29:56 AM by billdennis747 » Logged
duration
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« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2019, 07:11:40 AM »

Another option to consider is Icarex. It is by far the easiest covering material I've ever used. The stuff just lays there. Tmat did an excellent tutorial on Hip Pocket 3 or 4 years ago. A wide range of colors are available through kite shops. I get the white I use from Andriukov Models.

Louis

PS  My father used to use the silk over tissue method back in the 1940s. He said that it was lighter than silk alone because the tissue reduced the amount of dope needed to fill the weave of the silk. By the 1950s he had switched to silkspan. (Silkspan is similar too the material used for tea bags--it may be the same stuff.) I'm not sure about current availability. Sig used to sell it.
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Konrad
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« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2019, 09:03:14 AM »

  I used to cover my 1/12th scale WW1 models with silk over tissue, same process as Mike uses except I used the silk dry and flooded it with thinners, I found this easier for me as I don't cover with wet tissue either. I also liked the texture of the silk, as I only used a couple of thin coats to seal it, it had a more realistic look, probably not an issue with your models.
    
     I now use Polyspan, it is lighter and easier to repair if necessary.  It also can be used under printed tissue if required.
     Photo shows printed tissue over Polyspan.
Is there a source for "Polyspan"?
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Cut it twice and it's still too short!
billdennis747
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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2019, 10:02:00 AM »


Is there a source for "Polyspan"?
[/quote]
https://www.freeflightsupplies.co.uk/index.php/products/lightweight-covering-materials

shiny side out!
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DavidJP
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« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2019, 12:48:51 PM »

Yes do ensure shiny side out as the other side will give you a very fuzzy finish which will look rather horrible. 

I have found tha using thinners alone to lay the silk on, rather than thinned dope,  invarably stops blushing on the damp silk (which usually goes with the next coat of thinned dope).  However Bills wallpaper paste sounds a very good method with advantages.  Some people I gather have had no problems with easydope but I can’t adapt no matter how hard I try.
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luthierdan
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« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2019, 03:13:55 PM »

Thank you everyone for the information.
Polyspan is available from Larry Davidson in the U.S. at http://model flight.com
DavidJP mentions using thinner for attachment. I use a lightly loaded small brush dipped in acetone when covering with tissue, Silkspan or Polyspan. It provides for nearly instant bonding, flashes off very fast, and tends not to trap moisture...No blushing.
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